Synonyms containing sound localization

We've found 7,375 synonyms:

Sound localization

Sound localization

Sound localization refers to a listener's ability to identify the location or origin of a detected sound in direction and distance. It may also refer to the methods in acoustical engineering to simulate the placement of an auditory cue in a virtual 3D space. The sound localization mechanisms of the mammalian auditory system have been extensively studied. The auditory system uses several cues for sound source localization, including time- and level-differences between both ears, spectral information, timing analysis, correlation analysis, and pattern matching. These cues are also used by animals, but there may be differences in usage, and there are also localization cues which are absent in the human auditory system, such as the effects of ear movements.

— Freebase

Sound

Sound

sownd, v.i. to make a noise: to utter a voice: to spread or be spread: to appear on narration.—v.t. to cause to make a noise: to utter audibly: to direct by a sound or audible signal: to examine by percussion: to publish audibly.—n. the impression produced on the ear by the vibrations of air: noise, particular quality of tone: report, hearing-distance: empty or meaningless noise.—p.adj. Sound′ing, making a sound or noise: having a magnificent sound.—ns. Sound′ing-board, Sound′-board, the thin plate of wood or metal which increases and propagates the sound of a musical instrument: the horizontal board or structure over a pulpit, reading-desk, &c., carrying the speaker's voice towards the audience; Sound′ing-post, Sound′-post, a support set under the bridge of a violin, for propagating the sounds to the body of the instrument.—adj. Sound′less, without sound, silent: not capable of being sounded, unfathomable. [M. E. sounen—O. Fr. soner—L. sonāre, to sound, sonus, a sound.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pamlico Sound

Pamlico Sound

Pamlico Sound in North Carolina, is the largest lagoon along the U.S. East Coast, being 129 km long and 24 to 48 km wide. It is a body of water separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands, including Cape Hatteras. The Neuse and Pamlico rivers flow in from the west. Pamlico Sound is linked on the north with Albemarle Sound through Roanoke Sound and Croatan Sound. Core Sound is the narrow southern end. Explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano mistook the sound for the Pacific Ocean. The sound and its ocean inlets are noted for wide expanses of shallow water and occasional shoaling, making the area hazardous for larger vessels. In addition, the shallow waters are susceptible to wind and barometric pressure-driven tidal fluctuations. This effect is amplified on the tributary rivers, where water levels can change by as much as two feet in three hours when winds are aligned with the rivers' axes and are blowing strongly. Pamlico Sound is part of a large, interconnected network of lagoon estuaries. As a whole it is the second largest estuary in the United States;. Seven sounds making up the whole: Albemarle Sound, Currituck Sound, Croatan Sound, Pamlico Sound, Bogue Sound, Core Sound, and Roanoke Sound.

— Freebase

Perspecta

Perspecta

Perspecta was a directional motion picture sound system, invented by the laboratories at Fine Sound Inc. in 1954. As opposed to magnetic stereophonic soundtracks available at the time, its benefits were that it did not require a new sound head for the projector and thus was a cheaper alternative.Introduced as a "directional sound system" rather than a true stereophonic sound system, Perspecta did not use discretely recorded sound signals. Instead, three sub-audible tones at 30 Hz, 35 Hz, and 40 Hz are mixed appropriately and embedded in a monaural optical soundtrack, in addition to the audible sound. When run through a Perspecta integrator, depending on whenever each tone is present, the audio is fed into a left (30 Hz), center (35 Hz) and right (40 Hz) speaker. Unlike true stereophonic sound, which would be described as discrete tracks running in synchronization in time and phase, Perspecta merely panned a mono mix across various channels. Because of this, only isolated dialog or sound effects could be mixed to be directional. Mixed sound effects, dialog and music could not be suitably mixed. Aside from panning, Perspecta controlled gain levels for each channel through the amplitude of each control signal.MGM Studios and Paramount Pictures were major supporters and developers of Perspecta, and it was used, uncredited, on Paramount VistaVision pictures when the system was unveiled in 1954, with the exception of Hitchcock's features for Paramount, until it fell out of favor around 1958. In theory, the "High Fidelity" in VistaVision's trademark strongly implied high-fidelity sound, but, in reality, the system provided only higher fidelity Technicolor prints (after the 1955 revision of Technicolor's dye-transfer printing process), not higher fidelity sound. Universal-International, Warner Bros., Columbia Pictures, United Artists, and Toho were among some of the other major studios to utilize Perspecta regularly.

— Wikipedia

Sound film

Sound film

A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film. The first known public exhibition of projected sound films took place in Paris in 1900, but decades would pass before sound motion pictures were made commercially practical. Reliable synchronization was difficult to achieve with the early sound-on-disc systems, and amplification and recording quality were also inadequate. Innovations in sound-on-film led to the first commercial screening of short motion pictures using the technology, which took place in 1923. The primary steps in the commercialization of sound cinema were taken in the mid- to late 1920s. At first, the sound films incorporating synchronized dialogue—known as "talking pictures", or "talkies"—were exclusively shorts; the earliest feature-length movies with recorded sound included only music and effects. The first feature film originally presented as a talkie was The Jazz Singer, released in October 1927. A major hit, it was made with Vitaphone, the leading brand of sound-on-disc technology. Sound-on-film, however, would soon become the standard for talking pictures. By the early 1930s, the talkies were a global phenomenon. In the United States, they helped secure Hollywood's position as one of the world's most powerful cultural/commercial systems. In Europe the new development was treated with suspicion by many filmmakers and critics, who worried that a focus on dialogue would subvert the unique aesthetic virtues of soundless cinema. In Japan, where the popular film tradition integrated silent movie and live vocal performance, talking pictures were slow to take root. In India, sound was the transformative element that led to the rapid expansion of the nation's film industry—the most productive such industry in the world since the early 1960s.

— Freebase

Surround sound

Surround sound

Surround sound is a technique for enriching the sound reproduction quality of an audio source with additional audio channels from speakers that surround the listener, providing sound from a 360° radius in the horizontal plane as opposed to "screen channels" originating only from the listener's forward arc. Surround sound is characterized by a listener location or sweet spot where the audio effects work best, and presents a fixed or forward perspective of the sound field to the listener at this location. The technique enhances the perception of sound spatialization by exploiting sound localization; a listener's ability to identify the location or origin of a detected sound in direction and distance. Typically this is achieved by using multiple discrete audio channels routed to an array of loudspeakers. There are various surround sound based formats and techniques, varying in reproduction and recording methods along with the number and positioning of additional channels.

— Freebase

Regular ring

Regular ring

In commutative algebra, a regular ring is a commutative Noetherian ring, such that the localization at every prime ideal is a regular local ring: that is, every such localization has the property that the minimal number of generators of its maximal ideal is equal to its Krull dimension. The origin of the term regular ring lies in the fact that an affine variety is nonsingular (that is every point is regular) if and only if its ring of regular functions is regular. For regular rings, Krull dimension agrees with global homological dimension. Jean-Pierre Serre defined a regular ring as a commutative noetherian ring of finite global homological dimension. His definition is stronger than the definition above, which allows regular rings of infinite Krull dimension. Examples of regular rings include fields (of dimension zero) and Dedekind domains. If A is regular then so is A[X], with dimension one greater than that of A. In particular if k is a field, the polynomial ring k [ X 1 , … , X n ] {\displaystyle k[X_{1},\ldots ,X_{n}]} is regular. This is Hilbert's syzygy theorem. Any localization of a regular ring is regular as well. A regular ring is reduced but need not be an integral domain. For example, the product of two regular integral domains is regular, but not an integral domain.

— Wikipedia

Sound change

Sound change

Sound change includes any processes of language change that affect pronunciation or sound system structures. Sound change can consist of the replacement of one speech sound by another, the complete loss of the affected sound, or even the introduction of a new sound in a place where there previously was none. Sound changes can be environmentally conditioned, meaning that the change in question only occurs in a defined sound environment, whereas in other environments the same speech sound is not affected by the change. The term "sound change" refers to diachronic changes, or changes in a language's underlying sound system over time; "alternation", on the other hand, refers to surface changes that happen synchronically and do not change the language's underlying system. However, since "sound change" can refer to the historical introduction of an alternation, the label is inherently imprecise and often must be clarified as referring to phonetic change or restructuring.

— Freebase

Hughes' Induction Balance

Hughes' Induction Balance

An apparatus for determining the presence of a concealed mass of metal. The apparatus is variously connected. The cut shows a representative form; a and a' are two primary coils, each consisting of 100 meters (328 feet) of No. 32 silk covered copper wire (0.009 inch diameter) wound on a boxwood spool ten inches in depth; b and b' are secondary coils. All coils are supposed to be alike. The primary coils are joined in series with a battery of three or four Daniell cells. A microphone m is included in the same circuit. The secondary coils are joined in series with a telephone and in opposition with each other. The clock is used to produce a sound affecting the microphone. If all is exactly balanced there will be no sound produced in the telephone. This balance is brought about by slightly varying the distance of one of the secondaries from the primary, until there is no sound in the telephone. If now a piece of metal is placed within either of the coils, it disturbs the balance and the telephone sounds.

To measure the forces acting a sonometer or audiometer is used. This is shown in the upper part of the cut. Two fixed coils, c and e are mounted at the ends of a graduated bar. A movable coil d is connected in the telephone circuit; c and e by a switch can be connected with the battery and microphone circuit, leaving out the induction balance coils. The ends of the coils c and e, facing each other are of the same polarity. If these coils, c and e, were equal in all respects, no sound would be produced when d was midway between them. But they are so wound that the zero position for d is very near one of them, c.

Assume that a balance has been obtained in the induction balance with the coil d at zero. No sound is heard whether the switch is moved to throw the current into one or the other circuit. A piece of metal placed in one of the balance coils will cause the production of a sound. The current is turned into the sonometer and d is moved until the same sound, as tested by rapid movements of the switch, is heard in both circuits. The displacement of d gives the value of the sound.

A milligram of copper is enough to produce a loud sound. Two coins can be balanced against each other, and by rubbing one of them, or by breathing on one of them, the balance will be disturbed and a sound will be produced.

Prof. Hughes has also dispensed with the audiometer. He has used a strip of zinc tapering from a width of 4 mm. (.16 inch) at one end to a sharp edge or point at the other. The piece to be tested being in place in one coil, the strip is moved across the face of the other until a balance is obtained.

As possible uses the detection of counterfeit coins, the testing of metals for similarity of composition and the location of bullets in the body have been suggested. Care has to be taken that no masses of metal interfere. Thus in tests of the person of a wounded man, the presence of an iron truss, or of metallic bed springs may invalidate all conclusions.

The same principle is carried out in an apparatus in which the parts are arranged like the members of a Wheatstone bridge. One pair of coils is used, which react on each other as primary and secondary coils. One of the coils is in series with a telephone in the member of the bridge corresponding to that containing the galvanometer of the Wheatstone bridge. The latter is more properly termed an induction bridge.

Synonyms--Inductance Bridge--Inductance Balance--Induction Bridge.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Albemarle Sound

Albemarle Sound

Albemarle Sound is a large estuary on the coast of North Carolina in the United States located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and Roanoke. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a long barrier peninsula upon which the town of Kitty Hawk is located, at the eastern edge of the sound. Roanoke Island is situated at the southeastern corner of the sound, where it connects to Pamlico Sound. Much of the water in the Albemarle Sound is brackish or fresh, as opposed to the saltwater of the ocean, as a result of river water pouring into the sound. Some small portions of the Albemarle have been given their own "sound" names to distinguish these bodies of water from other parts of the large estuary. The Croatan Sound, for instance, lies between mainland Dare County and Roanoke Island. The eastern shore of the island to the Outer Banks is commonly referred to as the Roanoke Sound. The long stretch of water from near the Virginia state line south to around the Currituck County southern boundary is known as the Currituck Sound. The sound forms part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. Its coast saw the first permanent English settlements in what became North Carolina, the Albemarle Settlements. Many inland Tidewater communities along the Albemarle today are part of the Inner Banks region of the state.

— Freebase

Soundproofing

Soundproofing

Soundproofing is any means of reducing the sound pressure with respect to a specified sound source and receptor. There are several basic approaches to reducing sound: increasing the distance between source and receiver, using noise barriers to reflect or absorb the energy of the sound waves, using damping structures such as sound baffles, or using active antinoise sound generators. Two distinct soundproofing problems may need to be considered when designing acoustic treatments - to improve the sound within a room, and reduce sound leakage to/from adjacent rooms or outdoors. Acoustic quieting, noise mitigation, and noise control can be used to limit unwanted noise. Soundproofing can suppress unwanted indirect sound waves such as reflections that cause echoes and resonances that cause reverberation. Soundproofing can reduce the transmission of unwanted direct sound waves from the source to an involuntary listener through the use of distance and intervening objects in the sound path.

— Freebase

Audiography

Audiography

Audiography ("writing sound") within Indian-style filmmaking, is the audio engineering performed by the sound department of a film or TV production; this includes sound recording, editing, mixing and sound design but excludes musical composition, songwriting and choreography. An audiographer is responsible for more aspects of sound in film production than their more specialised Western world counterpart. The responsibilities include production sound recording, dialogue editing, sound design, sound effects editing, ADR editing, Foley editing and sound mixing (dubbing). A degree or diploma in audiography or audio electronics are the usual qualifications for the job.

— Wikipedia

Sondor

Sondor

Sondor is a manufacturer of Audio Video equipment located in Zollikon, Switzerland until 2017. Sondor was founded in 1952 by Willy Hungerbuehler. Sondor started as a manufacturer of 16 mm film and 35 mm film magnetic film equipment. They are noted as inventing the standard for bi-phase interlocking pulse signals to sync sound to film. Sondor added a film transport telecine to it line of film sound equipment. Sondor products are found in many in post-production studios for record and playback and in movie theater for sound playback. playback. Sondor film transport telecines uses a spinning prism telecine, like the model NOVA and ALTRA. Some Sound Film followers player-recorder are the: OMA E and BASIC. SOUNDHOUSE is a product to add sound pick up to other telecines, like the Spirit DataCine. The other major maker of sound followers is Magna Tech. DAT recorders and Direct to disk recording have replaced much of the work done on separate film sound followers. On December 9, 2016 Digital Film Technology (dft), completed the acquisition of Sondor. DFT is the maker of the Scanity film scanner. Current Sondor products: Versa, telecine-scanner, optical sound scan: and Magnetic sound scan Resonances, optical soundtrack

— Wikipedia

Critical distance

Critical distance

Critical distance is, in acoustics, the distance at which the sound pressure level of the direct sound D and the reverberant sound R are equal when dealing with a directional source. In other words, it is the point in space at which the combined amplitude of all the reflected echoes are the same as the amplitude of the sound coming directly from the source (D = R). This distance, called the critical distance d c {\displaystyle d_{c}} , is dependent on the geometry and absorption of the space in which the sound waves propagate, as well as the dimensions and shape of the sound source. In a reverberant space, the sound perceived by a listener is a combination of direct and reverberant sound. The ratio of direct sound is dependent on the distance between the source and the listener, and upon the reverberation time in [the room]. At a certain distance the two will be equal. This is called the "critical distance." A reverberant room generates a short critical distance and an acoustically dead (anechoic) room generates a longer critical distance.

— Wikipedia

Prince William Sound

Prince William Sound

Prince William Sound is a sound of the Gulf of Alaska on the south coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on the east side of the Kenai Peninsula. Its largest port is Valdez, at the southern terminus of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. Other settlements on the sound, which contains numerous small islands, include Cordova and Whittier plus the Alaska native villages of Chenega and Tatitlek. James Cook entered Prince William Sound in 1778 and named it Sandwich Sound, after his patron the Earl of Sandwich. The editors of Cook's maps changed the name to Prince William Sound, in honor of Prince William, who would later become King William IV. The Sound was named in 1778 by George Vancouver to honour George III's third son Prince William Henry, then aged thirteen and serving as a midshipman in the Royal Navy. Most of the land surrounding Prince William Sound is part of the Chugach National Forest, the second largest national forest in the U.S. Prince William Sound is ringed by the steep and glaciated Chugach Mountains. The coastline is convoluted, with many islands and fjords, several of which contain tidewater glaciers. The principal barrier islands forming the sound are Montague Island, Hinchinbrook Island, and Hawkins Island.

— Freebase

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. harmfully
  • B. noxiously
  • C. harmlessly
  • D. detrimentally