Synonyms containing spawn point

We've found 10,054 synonyms:

Point

Point

point, n. anything coming to a sharp end: the mark made by a sharp instrument: (geom.) that which has position but not length, breadth, or thickness: a mark showing the divisions of a sentence: (mus.) a dot at the right hand of a note to lengthen it by one-half: needle-point lace: a very small space: a moment of time: a small affair: a single thing: a single assertion: the precise thing to be considered: anything intended: exact place: degree: the unit of count in a game: (print.) a unit of measurement for type-bodies: an advantage: that which stings, as the point of an epigram: an imaginary relish, in 'potatoes and point:' a lively turn of thought: that which awakens attention: a peculiarity, characteristic: (cricket) the fielder standing at the immediate right of the batsman, and slightly in advance: a signal given by a trumpet: (pl.) chief or excellent features, as of a horse, &c.: the switch or movable rails which allow a train to pass from one line to another.—v.t. to give a point to: to sharpen: to aim: to direct one's attention: to punctuate, as a sentence: to fill the joints of with mortar, as a wall.—v.i. to direct the finger, the eye, or the mind towards an object: to show game by looking, as a dog.—adj. Point′ed, having a sharp point: sharp: intended for some particular person: personal: keen: telling: (archit.) having sharply-pointed arches, Gothic.—adv. Point′edly.—ns. Point′edness; Point′er, that which points: a dog trained to point out game; Point′ing, the act of sharpening: the marking of divisions in writing by points or marks: act of filling the crevices of a wall with mortar; Point′ing-stock, a thing to be pointed at, a laughing-stock; Point′-lace, a fine kind of lace wrought with the needle.—adj. Point′less, having no point: blunt: dull: wanting keenness or smartness; Points′man, a man who has charge of the points or switches on a railway; Point′-sys′tem, a standard system of sizes for type-bodies, one point being .0138 inch.—Point for point, exactly: all particulars; Point of order, a question raised in a deliberative society as to whether proceedings are according to the rules; Point of view, the position from which one looks at anything; Point out (B.), to assign; Points of the compass, the points north, south, east, and west, along with the twenty-eight smaller divisions, marked on the card of the mariner's compass.—At all points, completely; At, or On, the point of, just about to; Cardinal point (see Cardinal); Carry one's point, to gain what one contends for in controversy; From point to point, from one particular to another; Give points to, to give odds to: to give an advantageous hint on any subject; In point, apposite; In point of, with regard to; Make a point of, to attach special importance to; Stand upon points, to be over-scrupulous; Strain a point, to go beyond proper limits; To the point, appropriate. [O. Fr.,—L. punctumpungĕre, to prick.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spawn

Spawn

spawn, n. the eggs of fish or frogs when ejected: offspring.—adj. containing spawn.—v.t. to produce, as fishes and frogs do their eggs: to bring forth.—v.i. to deposit eggs, as fishes or frogs: to issue, as offspring.—ns. Spawn′er, the female fish from which the spawn is ejected; Spawn′ing; Spawn′ing-bed, -ground, a bed made in the bottom of a stream on which fish deposit their spawn. [O. Fr. espandre, to shed—L. expandĕre, to spread out.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Malebolgia

Malebolgia

Malebolgia (also referred to at times as the Malebolgia ) is a fictional character a supervillain appearing as the original main antagonist in comic books featuring the superhero Spawn and later reprise the role. Created by writer/artist Todd McFarlane, the character first appeared in Spawn #1 (May 1992). The name Malebolgia is derived from the term in Dante's Inferno used to describe Malebolge, the ditches (bolge) in the eighth circle of Hell, where humans who committed the sin Fraud are punished. He is Spawn's former master who serves as one of the major Lords of Hell. He is one of Spawn's archenemies alongside Jason Wynn and Violator.

— Wikipedia

Spawn

Spawn

Spawn is a fictional character, a comic book superhero who appears in a monthly comic book of the same name published by Image Comics. Created by writer/artist Todd McFarlane, the character first appeared in Malibu Sun #13. Spawn was ranked 60th on Wizard magazine's list of the Top 200 Comic Book Characters of All Time, 50th on Empire magazine's list of The 50 Greatest Comic Book Characters and 36th on IGN's 2011 Top 100 Comic Book Heroes. The series has spun off several other comics, including Angela, Curse of the Spawn, Sam & Twitch, and the Japanese manga Shadows of Spawn. Spawn was adapted into a 1997 feature film, an HBO animated series lasting from 1997 until 1999, and a series of action figures whose high level of detail made McFarlane Toys known in the toy industry.

— Freebase

Point process

Point process

In statistics and probability theory, a point process or point field is a collection of mathematical points randomly located on some underlying mathematical space such as the real line, the Cartesian plane, or more abstract spaces. Point processes can be used as mathematical models of phenomena or objects representable as points in some type of space. There are different mathematical interpretations of a point process, such as a random counting measure or a random set. Some authors regard a point process and stochastic process as two different objects such that a point process is a random object that arises from or is associated with a stochastic process, though it has been remarked that the difference between point processes and stochastic processes is not clear. Others consider a point process as a stochastic process, where the process is indexed by sets of the underlying space on which it is defined, such as the real line or n {\displaystyle n} -dimensional Euclidean space. Other stochastic processes such as renewal and counting processes are studied in the theory of point processes. Sometimes the term "point process" is not preferred, as historically the word "process" denoted an evolution of some system in time, so point process is also called a random point field.Point processes are well studied objects in probability theory and the subject of powerful tools in statistics for modeling and analyzing spatial data, which is of interest in such diverse disciplines as forestry, plant ecology, epidemiology, geography, seismology, materials science, astronomy, telecommunications, computational neuroscience, economics and others. Point processes on the real line form an important special case that is particularly amenable to study, because the points are ordered in a natural way, and the whole point process can be described completely by the (random) intervals between the points. These point processes are frequently used as models for random events in time, such as the arrival of customers in a queue (queueing theory), of impulses in a neuron (computational neuroscience), particles in a Geiger counter, location of radio stations in a telecommunication network or of searches on the world-wide web.

— Wikipedia

Cogliostro

Cogliostro

Cogliostro (; also Cog) is a fictional character in Todd McFarlane's Spawn comic series. Cogliostro was created in 1993 by author Neil Gaiman and artist Todd McFarlane and introduced in Spawn issue #9. He was originally a supporting character in the spawn series but later becomes an antagonist in the series.

— Wikipedia

Centre

Centre

Center, sen′tėr, n. the middle point of anything, esp. a circle or sphere: the middle: the point toward which all things move or are drawn: the chief leader of an organisation—head-centre: the men of moderate political opinions in the French Chamber, sitting right in front of the president, with extreme men on the right and on the left—further subdivisions are Right-centre and Left-centre: the Ultramontane party in Germany.—v.t. to place on or collect to a centre.—v.i. to be placed in the middle:—pr.p. cen′tring, cen′tering; pa.p. cen′tred, cen′tered.—adj. Cen′tral, belonging to the centre, principal, dominant: belonging to a nerve-centre, of affections caused by injury to the brain or spinal cord.—ns. Centralisā′tion, Cen′tralism, the tendency to administer by the sovereign or central government matters which would be otherwise under local management.—v.t. Cen′tralise, to draw to a centre.—n. Central′ity, central position.—advs. Cen′trally, Cen′trically.—ns. Cen′tre-bit, a joiner's tool, turning on a centre, for boring circular holes—one of the chief tools of the burglar; Cen′tre-board, a shifting keel, fitted to drop below and in line with the keel proper in order to increase or diminish the draught of a boat—much used in United States racing yachts; Cen′tre-piece, an ornament for the middle of a table, ceiling, &c.—adjs. Cen′tric, Cen′trical, relating to, placed in, or containing the centre.—ns. Cen′tricalness, Centric′ity; Cen′trum, the body of a vertebra.—Central fire, said of a cartridge in which the fulminate is placed in the centre of the base, as opposed to rim fire; Central forces, forces whose action is to cause a moving body to tend towards a fixed point called the centre of force.—Centre of attraction, the point to which bodies tend by the force of gravity; Centre of buoyancy, or displacement, the point in an immersed body at which the resultant vertical pressure may be supposed to act; Centre of gravity, a certain point, invariably situated with regard to the body, through which the resultant of the attracting forces between the earth and its several molecules always passes; Centre of inertia, or mass, the centre of a set of parallel forces acting on all the particles of a body, each force being proportional to the mass of the particle on which it acts; Centre of oscillation, the point in a body occupied by that particle which is accelerated and retarded to an equal amount, and which therefore moves as if it were a single pendulum unconnected with the rest of the body; Centre of percussion, the point in which the direction of a blow, given to a body, intersects the plane in which the fixed axis and the centre of inertia lie, making the body begin to rotate about a fixed axis, without causing any pressure on the axis; Centre of pressure, the point at which the direction of a single force, which is equivalent to the fluid pressure on the plane surface, meets the surface. [Fr.,—L. centrum—Gr. kentron, a sharp point

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nonpoint source pollution

Nonpoint source pollution

Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution is pollution resulting from many diffuse sources, in direct contrast to point source pollution which results from a single source. Nonpoint source pollution generally results from land runoff, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, drainage, seepage, or hydrological modification (rainfall and snowmelt) where tracing pollution back to a single source is difficult.Non-point source water pollution affects a water body from sources such as polluted runoff from agricultural areas draining into a river, or wind-borne debris blowing out to sea. Non-point source air pollution affects air quality from sources such as smokestacks or car tailpipes. Although these pollutants have originated from a point source, the long-range transport ability and multiple sources of the pollutant make it a non-point source of pollution. Non-point source pollution can be contrasted with point source pollution, where discharges occur to a body of water or into the atmosphere at a single location. NPS may derive from many different sources with no specific solution may change to rectify the problem, making it difficult to regulate. Non point source water pollution is difficult to control because it comes from the everyday activities of many different people, such as lawn fertilization, applying pesticides, road construction or building construction.It is the leading cause of water pollution in the United States today, with polluted runoff from agriculture and hydromodification the primary sources. Other significant sources of runoff include habitat modification and silviculture (forestry).Contaminated stormwater washed off parking lots, roads and highways, and lawns (often containing fertilizers and pesticides) is called urban runoff. This runoff is often classified as a type of NPS pollution. Some people may also consider it a point source because many times it is channeled into municipal storm drain systems and discharged through pipes to nearby surface waters. However, not all urban runoff flows through storm drain systems before entering water bodies. Some may flow directly into water bodies, especially in developing and suburban areas. Also, unlike other types of point sources, such as industrial discharges, sewage treatment plants and other operations, pollution in urban runoff cannot be attributed to one activity or even group of activities. Therefore, because it is not caused by an easily identified and regulated activity, urban runoff pollution sources are also often treated as true non-point sources as municipalities work to abate them.

— Wikipedia

Brown trout

Brown trout

The brown trout is an originally European species of salmonid fish. It includes both purely freshwater populations, referred to Salmo trutta morpha fario and S. trutta morpha lacustris, and anadromous forms known as the sea trout, S. trutta morpha trutta. The latter migrates to the oceans for much of its life and returns to freshwater only to spawn. Sea trout in the UK and Ireland have many regional names, including sewin, finnock, peal, mort and white trout. The specific epithet trutta derives from the Latin trutta, meaning, literally, "trout". The lacustrine morph of brown trout is most usually potamodromous, migrating from lakes into rivers or streams to spawn, although evidence indicates stocks spawn on wind-swept shorelines of lakes. S. trutta morpha fario forms stream-resident populations, typically in alpine streams, but sometimes in larger rivers. Anadromous and nonanadromous morphs coexisting in the same river appear not to be genetically distinct. What determines whether or not they migrate remains unknown.

— Freebase

Rainbow trout

Rainbow trout

The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is a trout and species of salmonid native to cold-water tributaries of the Pacific Ocean in Asia and North America. The steelhead (sometimes called "steelhead trout") is an anadromous (sea-run) form of the coastal rainbow trout (O. m. irideus) or Columbia River redband trout (O. m. gairdneri) that usually returns to fresh water to spawn after living two to three years in the ocean. Freshwater forms that have been introduced into the Great Lakes and migrate into tributaries to spawn are also called steelhead. Adult freshwater stream rainbow trout average between 1 and 5 lb (0.5 and 2.3 kg), while lake-dwelling and anadromous forms may reach 20 lb (9 kg). Coloration varies widely based on subspecies, forms and habitat. Adult fish are distinguished by a broad reddish stripe along the lateral line, from gills to the tail, which is most vivid in breeding males. Wild-caught and hatchery-reared forms of this species have been transplanted and introduced for food or sport in at least 45 countries and every continent except Antarctica. Introductions to locations outside their native range in the United States (U.S.), Southern Europe, Australia, New Zealand and South America have damaged native fish species. Introduced populations may affect native species by preying on them, out-competing them, transmitting contagious diseases (such as whirling disease), or hybridizing with closely related species and subspecies, thus reducing genetic purity. The rainbow trout is included in the list of the top 100 globally invasive species. Nonetheless, other introductions into waters previously devoid of any fish species or with severely depleted stocks of native fish have created sport fisheries such as the Great Lakes and Wyoming's Firehole River. Some local populations of specific subspecies, or in the case of steelhead, distinct population segments, are listed as either threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. The steelhead is the official state fish of Washington.

— Wikipedia

Spat

Spat

to emit spawn; to emit, as spawn

— Webster Dictionary

Cut-point

Cut-point

In topology, a cut-point is a point of a connected space such that its removal causes the resulting space to be disconnected. If removal of a point doesn't result in disconnected spaces, this point is called a non-cut point. For example, every point of a line is a cut-point, while no point of a circle is a cut-point. Cut-points are useful to determine whether two connected spaces are homeomorphic by counting the number of cut-points in each space.If two spaces have different number of cut-points, they are not homeomorphic. A classic example is using cut-points to show that lines and circles are not homeomorphic. Cut-points are also useful in the characterization of topological continua, a class of spaces which combine the properties of compactness and connectedness and include many familiar spaces such as the unit interval, the circle, and the torus.

— Wikipedia

Microscopy, Electron, Scanning

Microscopy, Electron, Scanning

Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Dew point

Dew point

The dew point is the temperature below which the water vapor in a volume of humid air at a given constant barometric pressure will condense into liquid water at the same rate at which it evaporates. Condensed water is called dew when it forms on a solid surface. The dew point is a water-to-air saturation temperature. The dew point is associated with relative humidity. A high relative humidity indicates that the dew point is closer to the current air temperature. Relative humidity of 100% indicates the dew point is equal to the current temperature and that the air is maximally saturated with water. When the dew point remains constant and temperature increases, relative humidity decreases. General aviation pilots use dew-point data to calculate the likelihood of carburetor icing and fog, and to estimate the height of the cloud base. At a given temperature but independent of barometric pressure, the dew point is a consequence of the absolute humidity, the mass of water per unit volume of air. If both the temperature and pressure rise, however, the dew point will rise and the relative humidity will lower accordingly. Reducing the absolute humidity without changing other variables will bring the dew point back down to its initial value. In the same way, increasing the absolute humidity after a temperature drop brings the dew point back down to its initial level. If the temperature rises in conditions of constant pressure, then the dew point will remain constant but the relative humidity will drop. For this reason, a constant relative humidity with different temperatures implies that when it's hotter, a higher fraction of the air is water vapor than when it's cooler.

— Freebase

Centrosymmetry

Centrosymmetry

The term centrosymmetric, as generally used in crystallography, refers to a point group which contains an inversion center as one of its symmetry elements. In such a point group, for every point in the unit cell there is an indistinguishable point. Crystals with an inversion center cannot display certain properties, such as the piezoelectric effect. Point groups lacking an inversion center are further divided into polar and chiral types. A chiral point group is one without any rotoinversion symmetry elements. Rotoinversion is rotation followed by inversion; for example, a mirror reflection corresponds to a twofold rotoinversion. Chiral point groups must therefore only contain rotational symmetry. These arise from the crystal point groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 222, 422, 622, 32, 23, and 432. Chiral molecules such as proteins crystallize in chiral point groups. The term polar is often used for those point groups which are neither centrosymmetric nor chiral. However, the term is more correctly used for any point group containing a unique anisotropic axis. These occur in crystal point groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, m, mm2, 3m, 4mm, and 6mm. Thus some chiral space groups are also polar.

— Freebase

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