Synonyms containing splinter bar

We've found 2,211 synonyms:

port of bar

port of bar

An accumulated shoal or bank of sand, shingle, gravel, or other uliginous substances, thrown up by the sea to the mouth of a river or harbour, so as to endanger, and sometimes totally prevent, the navigation into it.--Bars of rivers are some shifting and some permanent. The position of the bar of any river may commonly be guessed by attending to the form of the shores at the embouchure. The shore on which the deposition of sediment is going on will be flat, whilst the opposite one is steep. It is along the side of the latter that the deepest channel of the river lies; and in the line of this channel, but without the points that form the mouth of the river, will be the bar. If both the shores are of the same nature, which seldom happens, the bar will lie opposite the middle of the channel. Rivers in general have what may be deemed a bar, in respect of the depth of the channel within, although it may not rise high enough to impede the navigation--for the increased deposition that takes place when the current slackens, through the want of declivity, and of shores to retain it, must necessarily form a bank. Bars of small rivers may be deepened by means of stockades to confine the river current, and prolong it beyond the natural points of the river's mouth. They operate to remove the place of deposition further out, and into deeper water. Bars, however, act as breakwaters in most instances, and consequently secure smooth water within them. The deposit in all curvilinear or serpentine rivers will always be found at the point opposite to the curve into which the ebb strikes and rebounds, deepening the hollow and depositing on the tongue. Therefore if it be deemed advisable to change the position of a bar, it may be in some cases aided by works projected on the last curve sea-ward. By such means a parallel canal may be forced which will admit vessels under the cover of the bar.--Bar, a boom formed of huge trees, or spars lashed together, moored transversely across a port, to prevent entrance or egress.--Bar, the short bits of bar-iron, about half a pound each, used as the medium of traffic on the Negro coast.--Bar-harbour, one which, from a bar at its entrance, cannot admit ships of great burden, or can only do so at high-water.--Capstan-bars, large thick bars put into the holes of the drumhead of the capstan, by which it is turned round, they working as horizontal radial levers.--Hatch-bars, flat iron bars to lock over the hatches for security from theft, &c.--Port-bar, a piece of wood or iron variously fitted to secure a gun-port when shut.--Bar-shallow, a term sometimes applied to a portion of a bar with less water on it than on other parts of the bar.--Bar-shot, two half balls joined together by a bar of iron, for cutting and destroying spars and rigging. When whole balls are thus fitted they are more properly double-headed shot.--To bar. To secure the lower-deck ports, as above.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

harbour

harbour

An accumulated shoal or bank of sand, shingle, gravel, or other uliginous substances, thrown up by the sea to the mouth of a river or harbour, so as to endanger, and sometimes totally prevent, the navigation into it.--Bars of rivers are some shifting and some permanent. The position of the bar of any river may commonly be guessed by attending to the form of the shores at the embouchure. The shore on which the deposition of sediment is going on will be flat, whilst the opposite one is steep. It is along the side of the latter that the deepest channel of the river lies; and in the line of this channel, but without the points that form the mouth of the river, will be the bar. If both the shores are of the same nature, which seldom happens, the bar will lie opposite the middle of the channel. Rivers in general have what may be deemed a bar, in respect of the depth of the channel within, although it may not rise high enough to impede the navigation--for the increased deposition that takes place when the current slackens, through the want of declivity, and of shores to retain it, must necessarily form a bank. Bars of small rivers may be deepened by means of stockades to confine the river current, and prolong it beyond the natural points of the river's mouth. They operate to remove the place of deposition further out, and into deeper water. Bars, however, act as breakwaters in most instances, and consequently secure smooth water within them. The deposit in all curvilinear or serpentine rivers will always be found at the point opposite to the curve into which the ebb strikes and rebounds, deepening the hollow and depositing on the tongue. Therefore if it be deemed advisable to change the position of a bar, it may be in some cases aided by works projected on the last curve sea-ward. By such means a parallel canal may be forced which will admit vessels under the cover of the bar.--Bar, a boom formed of huge trees, or spars lashed together, moored transversely across a port, to prevent entrance or egress.--Bar, the short bits of bar-iron, about half a pound each, used as the medium of traffic on the Negro coast.--Bar-harbour, one which, from a bar at its entrance, cannot admit ships of great burden, or can only do so at high-water.--Capstan-bars, large thick bars put into the holes of the drumhead of the capstan, by which it is turned round, they working as horizontal radial levers.--Hatch-bars, flat iron bars to lock over the hatches for security from theft, &c.--Port-bar, a piece of wood or iron variously fitted to secure a gun-port when shut.--Bar-shallow, a term sometimes applied to a portion of a bar with less water on it than on other parts of the bar.--Bar-shot, two half balls joined together by a bar of iron, for cutting and destroying spars and rigging. When whole balls are thus fitted they are more properly double-headed shot.--To bar. To secure the lower-deck ports, as above.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Bar stool

Bar stool

Bar stools are a type of tall stool, often with a foot rest, which because of their height and narrowness are designed for seating in a public house or bar. However, bar stools are becoming more popular in homes, usually placed at the kitchen counter or at a home bar. Bar stools are becoming more popular because their varied styles not only are more appealing than the common wooden stool but actually accentuate the theme of a home. Bar stools allow for a higher view when eating, drinking, or socializing and can add to the atmosphere, given the right bar stool. There are many different constructions. Bar stools are often made of wood or metal. There are bar stools with and without armrests, back, and padding on the seat surface. Bar stools can range from basic wooden designs to extremely detailed ones with a custom height for the perfect fit. Extra tall and extra short are common features, as well as indoor bar stools and outdoor bar stools. Some bar stools have backs, while most do not. In commercial settings, swivel and floor mounted bar stools are common, floor mounting renders the stool less likely to be moved, stolen or used as a weapon. Floor mounted stools generally are mounted on a column but stools with legs can also be secured to the floor using metal angles.

— Freebase

Bar

Bar

bär, n. a rod of any solid substance: a bolt: a hindrance or obstruction—the barrier of a city or street, as the bars of York, Temple Bar, a toll-bar: a bank of sand or other matter at the mouth of a river: any terminus or limit (of life)—e.g. as in To cross the bar: the railing that encloses a space in a tavern, the counter across which drinks are served, a public-house: the wooden rail dividing off the judge's seat, at which prisoners are placed for arraignment or sentence—hence, To appear at the bar, To pass the bar = to be formally referred for trial from a lower court to a higher: any tribunal: the pleaders in a court as distinguished from the judges: a division in music.—v.t. to fasten or secure, as with a bar: to hinder or exclude:—pr.p. bar′ring; pa.p. barred.—ns. Bar′-ī′ron, iron in malleable bars; Bar′maid, a female waiter at the bar of a tavern or hotel.—prep. Bar′ring, excepting, saving.—ns. Bar′ring-out, the shutting of the school-room doors and windows by the pupils against the master, in order to enforce assent to their demands; Bar′wood, a kind of red dye-wood imported from Africa in bars. [O. Fr. barre—Low L. barra, perh. of Celt. origin.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bar chart

Bar chart

A bar chart or bar graph is a chart with rectangular bars with lengths proportional to the values that they represent. The bars can be plotted vertically or horizontally. A vertical bar chart is sometimes called a column bar chart. What it is: A bar graph is a chart that uses either horizontal or vertical bars to show comparisons among categories. One axis of the chart shows the specific categories being compared, and the other axis represents a discrete value. Some bar graphs present bars clustered in groups of more than one, and others show the bars divided into subparts to show cumulate effect. How to use it: Determine the discrete range. Examine your data to find the bar with the largest value. This will help you determine the range of the vertical axis and the size of each increment. Then label the vertical axis. Determine the number of bars. Examine your data to find how many bars your chart will contain. These may be single, grouped, or stacked bars. Use this number to draw and label the horizontal axis. Determine the order of the bars. Bars may be arranged in any order. Normally, bars showing frequency will be arranged in chronological sequence. Draw the bars. If you are preparing a grouped bar graph, remember to present the information in the same order in each grouping. If you are preparing a stacked bar graph, present the information in the same sequence on each bar. Bar charts provide a visual presentation of categorical data. Categorical data is a grouping of data into discrete groups, such as months of the year, age group, shoe sizes, and animals. In a column bar chart, the categories appear along the horizontal axis; the height of the bar corresponds to the value of each category.

— Freebase

Bar review

Bar review

A bar review is a series of classes that most law school graduates attend prior to taking a bar examination. Common examples include Kaplan PMBR, BARBRI, BarPlus Bar Review, Marino Bar Review, Rigos Bar Review and the Preliminary Multistate Bar Review. The majority of bar review courses offer classroom based instruction for both the Multistate Bar Examination as well as the state specific portions of the exam administered in each state. A variety of other companies, such as Supreme Bar Review,Law Preps LLC,AdaptiBar, and e-BarReview offer individualized instruction focused on the bar applicant's specific needs, through the use of tutoring, small group instruction and online test preparation. Some companies, such as Pieper New York-Multistate Bar Review, Ltd, and the former Richmond Bar Review have often offered more accurate state-specific reviews of the essay portions, which concern solely specific state law, which differs in certain way from state to state. Many of these bar review companies have begun offering their instructional materials in new media formats, such as smartphone applications and e-books, allowing for greater flexibility and convenience for students.

— Freebase

T-bar lift

T-bar lift

A T-bar lift, also called T-bar, is a mechanised system for transporting skiers and snowboarders uphill, along the surface of the slope. In North America it is generally employed for low-capacity slopes in large resorts and small local areas servicing skiers numbered in the dozens rather than in the hundreds or thousands. It consists of an aerial steel rope loop running over a series of wheels, powered by an engine at one end. Hanging from the rope are a series of vertical recoiling cables, each attached to a T-shaped bar measuring about a metre in both dimensions. The horizontal bar is placed behind the skier's buttocks or in between the snowboarder's legs, pushing against the inside of their forward leg's thigh. This pushes the passengers uphill while they slide across the ground. A single T-bar transports one or two people. The same basic design principle as the T-bar can be seen in two related, single-passenger surface lifts: the J-bar, effectively a one-sided T-bar, and the platter, which involves the skier straddling the pole as one would a hobby horse and resting the buttocks on a single, usually plastic, platter. The T-bar is considerably more common in North America than either of these related lifts, largely because it offers twice the lift capacity for the same motivator mechanisms. The first T-bar lift in the United States was installed in 1940 at Pico Mountain ski area. It was considered a great improvement over the rope tow.

— Freebase

Horizontal bar

Horizontal bar

The horizontal bar, also known as the high bar, is an apparatus used by male gymnasts in Artistic Gymnastics. It traditionally consists of a cylindrical metal bar that is rigidly held above and parallel to the floor by a system of cables and stiff vertical supports. Gymnasts typically wear leather grips while performing on the bar. Current elite-level competition uses a more elastic fiberglass core rail similar in material to the rails used in the women's uneven bars and men's parallel bars apparatus. The gymnastics elements performed on the horizontal bar are regulated by a Code of Points. A bar routine, which is a sequence of several bar skills, usually includes giant swings with various grips, in-bar work, turns, release and regrasp skills, and a dismount. The horizontal bar is often considered one of the most exciting gymnastics events due to the power exhibited by gymnasts during giant swings and spectacular aerial releases and dismounts that often include multiple flips or twists and, in some cases, airborne travel over the bar.

— Freebase

Wet bar

Wet bar

A wet-bar is a small bar used for mixing alcoholic beverages, which differs from a regular bar in that it includes a sink with running water. A wet-bar can increase the rate at which drinks are served because of the sink, which allows for glasses to be cleaned immediately. The sink may also be used for adding water to drinks. Wet-bars are found in homes for entertainment purposes. A finished basement is a typical location for a wet bar. Wet-bars are relatively simple to build, and, thus, many homeowners have turned the wet-bar into a do-it-yourself project. Recently, hotels have been incorporating wet-bars into rooms, in which case the customer must pay to use the wet bar per drink. Including a refrigerator beneath the bar or cabinet is a popular option. This is useful for making chilled drinks and preserving previously made mixtures. The wet-bar refrigerator is generally kept beneath the bar or cabinet in a small storage area.

— Freebase

X-bar theory

X-bar theory

X-bar theory is a component of linguistic theory which attempts to identify syntactic features presumably common to all those human languages that fit in a presupposed framework. It claims that among their phrasal categories, all those languages share certain structural similarities, including one known as the "X-bar", which does not appear in traditional phrase structure rules for English or other natural languages. X-bar theory was first proposed by Noam Chomsky and further developed by Ray Jackendoff. An X-bar theoretic understanding of sentence structure is possible in a constituency-based grammar only; it is not possible in a dependency-based grammar. The letter X is used to signify an arbitrary lexical category; when analyzing a specific utterance, specific categories are assigned. Thus, the X may become an N for noun, a V for verb, an A for adjective, or a P for preposition. The term X-bar is derived from the notation representing this structure. Certain structures are represented by X. Because this is difficult to typeset, this is often written as X′, using the prime symbol. In English, however, this is still read as "X bar". The notation XP stands for X Phrase, and is equivalent to X-bar-bar, written X″, usually read aloud as X double bar.

— Freebase

Fosbury Flop

Fosbury Flop

The Fosbury Flop is a style used in the athletics event of high jump. It was popularized and perfected by American athlete Dick Fosbury, whose gold medal in the 1968 Summer Olympics brought it to the world's attention. Over the next few years the flop became the dominant style of the event and remains so today. Before Fosbury, most elite jumpers used the Straddle technique, Western Roll, Eastern cut-off or even Scissors-Jump to clear the bar. Given that landing surfaces had previously been sandpits or low piles of matting, high jumpers of earlier years had to land on their feet or at least land carefully to prevent injury. With the advent of deep foam matting high jumpers were able to be more adventurous in their landing styles and hence experiment with styles of jumping. The approach in the Flop style of high jump is characterized by the final four or five steps being run in a curve, allowing the athlete to lean into his or her turn, away from the bar. This allows the center of gravity to be lowered even before knee flexion, giving a longer time period for the take-off thrust. Additionally, on take-off the sudden move from inward lean outwards produces a rotation of the jumper's body along the axis of the bar, aiding clearance. Combined with the rotation around the jumper's vertical axis produced by the drive leg the resulting body position on bar clearance is laid out supine with the body at ninety degrees to the bar with the head and shoulders crossing the bar before the trunk and legs. This gives the Flop its characteristic "backwards over the bar" appearance, with the athlete landing on the mat on their shoulders and back. While in flight the athlete can progressively arch shoulders, back and legs in a rolling motion, keeping as much of the body as possible below the bar. It is possible for the athlete to clear the bar while his or her body's center of mass remains as much as 20 cm below it. While the Straddle style required strength in the takeoff knee and could be used by relatively burly athletes, the Flop allowed athletes of a slender build to use their co-ordination to greater effect and not risk the knee injuries which they had previously suffered from other styles.

— Freebase

Bar stock

Bar stock

Bar stock, also colloquially known as billet, is a common form of raw purified metal, used by industry to manufacture metal parts and products. Most metal produced by a steel mill or aluminium plant is formed into long continuous strips of various size and shape. These strips are cut at regular intervals and allowed to cool, each segment becoming a piece of bar stock. A good analogy is pasta-making, in which lumps of dough are extruded into various cross-sectional shapes; cut into lengths; and then dried in that form. The cross-sectional shapes of pasta vary from simple bar or tube shapes to more elaborate extrusions. The same is true of metal bar stock. The most common shapes are round bar, rectangular bar, and hexagonal bar. Tube and pipe are similar, but have hollow centers and are traditionally not called "bar" in industrial usage. Also similar in concept, but not called "bar", are the common structural shapes such as angle stock and channel stock. These are commonly available in steel and aluminum; the names "angle iron" and "channel iron" are still commonly used even though their literal namesake, wrought iron, has been replaced by steel and aluminum for most uses.

— Freebase

Title bar

Title bar

In computing, the title bar consists of that part of a window where the title of the window appears. Most graphical operating systems and window managers position the title bar at the top of the application window as a horizontal bar. Default title-bar text often incorporates the name of the application and/or of its developer. The name of the host running the application also appears frequently. Various methods may exist to give the end-user some control of title-bar text. Document-oriented applications like a text editor may display the filename or path of the document being edited. Most web browsers will render the contents of the HTML element title in their title bar, often pre- or postfixed by the application name. Google Chrome places its tabs in the title bar, so it is not necessary to use the main window for the tabs. The title bar often contains icons for system commands relating to the window, such as a maximize, minimize, rollup and close buttons; and may include other content such as an application icon, a clock, etc. In many graphical user interfaces, including the Mac OS and Microsoft Windows interfaces, the user may move a window by grabbing the title bar and dragging.

— Freebase

cross of Lorraine

cross of Lorraine

A cross consisting of a vertical bar intersected by a shorter horizontal one above its midpoint, and again by another horizontal bar half the length of the first, intersecting the vertical bar midway between the larger horizontal bar and the top of the vertical bar:

— Wiktionary

Bar

Bar

The bar is a non-SI unit of pressure, defined by the IUPAC as exactly equal to 100,000 Pa. It is about equal to the atmospheric pressure on Earth at sea level, and since 1982 the IUPAC has recommended that the standard for atmospheric pressure should be harmonized to 100,000 Pa = 1 bar ≈ 750.0616827 Torr. The same definition is used in the compressor and the pneumatic tool industries. The bar and the millibar were introduced by the British meteorologist William Napier Shaw in 1909, while he was the director of the Meteorological Office in London. Units derived from the bar are the megabar, kilobar, decibar, centibar, and millibar. They are not SI or cgs units, but they are accepted for use with the SI. The bar is legally recognized in countries of the European Union. The bar unit is sometimes deprecated. While the BIPM includes it under the class "Non-SI units accepted for use with the SI", the NIST includes it in the list of units to avoid and recommends to use kilopascals and megapascals instead. Bar is a unit of gauge pressure, i.e., pressure in bars above ambient or atmospheric pressure; see absolute pressure and gauge pressure below.

— Freebase

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An antonym for "ignominious"
  • A. opprobrious
  • B. honorable
  • C. inglorious
  • D. smuggled