Synonyms containing squat lobster

We've found 231 synonyms:

Lobster roll

Lobster roll

A traditional lobster roll is a sandwich filled with lobster meat soaked in butter and served on a steamed hot dog bun or similar roll, so that the opening is on the top rather than on the side. There are variations of this sandwich made in other parts of New England, which may contain diced celery or scallion, and mayonnaise. The sandwich may also contain lettuce, lemon juice, salt and black pepper. Traditional New England restaurants serve lobster rolls with potato chips or french fries on the side. The lobster roll was first originated at a restaurant named Perry's, in Milford, Connecticut as early as 1929., according to John Mariani's, "Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink." Once Perry's put the new sandwich on its menu, its popularity spread up and down the Connecticut coast, but not far beyond. For those residing in Connecticut, a lobster roll served warm is simply called a "lobster roll" while the lobster roll served cold as it is throughout the rest of the northeast region and the world is called a "lobster salad roll" . The lobster salad roll took off on the Eastern End of Long Island, NY starting in 1965, pioneered by the Lobster Roll Restaurant The Lobster Roll.

— Freebase

Tomalley

Tomalley

Tomalley or lobster paste is the soft, green substance found in the body cavity of lobsters, that fulfills the functions of both the liver and the pancreas. Tomalley corresponds to the hepatopancreas in other arthropods. It is considered a delicacy, and may be eaten alone but is often added to sauces for flavour and as a thickening agent. The term lobster paste or lobster pâté can also be used to indicate a mixture of tomalley and lobster roe. Lobster bisque, lobster stock, and lobster consommé are made using lobster bodies, often including the lobster liver. The hepatopancreas of a crab is also called tomalley; in crabs the tomalley is yellow or yellow-green in colour. In Maryland and on the Delmarva Peninsula, the hepatopancreas of the blue crab is called the "muster" or "mustard", probably because of the yellow colour, which is not the bright yellow of regular prepared yellow mustard, but closer to one of the brown mustards, such as Dijon mustard. Particularly when eating steamed or boiled crabs, it is considered a delicacy. The tomalley in general can be consumed in moderation. It can, however, contain high levels of PCBs which can give a number of negative health effects in large concentrations. It may also contain toxins that are associated with paralytic shellfish poisoning. Those toxins do not leach out when the lobster is cooked in boiling water. The toxins responsible for most shellfish poisonings are water-insoluble, heat and acid-stable, and thus are not diminished by cooking.

— Freebase

Lobster Thermidor

Lobster Thermidor

Lobster Thermidor is a French dish consisting of a creamy mixture of cooked lobster meat, egg yolks, and cognac or brandy, stuffed into a lobster shell. It can also be served with an oven-browned cheese crust, typically Gruyère. The sauce must contain mustard. Lobster Thermidor was created in 1894 by Marie's, a Parisian restaurant near the theatre Comédie Française, to honour the opening of the play Thermidor by Victorien Sardou. The play took its name from a summer month in the French Republican Calendar, during which the Thermidorian Reaction occurred, overthrowing Robespierre and ending the Reign of Terror. Due to expensive and extensive preparation involved, Lobster Thermidor is usually considered a recipe primarily for special occasions. Lobster Thermidor is related to Lobster Newberg, created some 20 years earlier in the United States. Lobster Thermidor is referenced in the famous Monty Python Spam Sketch.

— Freebase

Squat

Squat

skwot, v.i. to sit down upon the hams or heels: to cower, as an animal: to settle on new land without title:—pr.p. squat′ting; pa.t. and pa.p. squat′ted.adj. short and thick, dumpy, clumsy.—ns. Squatoc′racy, the squatters of Australia collectively; Squat′ter, a settler on new land without title: one who leases pasture-land from the government; Squat′tiness.—v.i. Squat′tle (Scot.), to squat down.—adj. Squat′ty, very short and thick. [O. Fr. esquatir, to crush—L. ex-, coactus, pa.p. of cogĕre, to drive together.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lobster trap

Lobster trap

A lobster trap or lobster pot is a portable trap that traps lobsters or crayfish and is used in lobster fishing. A lobster trap can hold several lobsters. Lobster traps are constructed of wire and wood. An opening permits the lobster to enter a tunnel of netting. Pots are usually constructed in two parts, called the "chamber" or “kitchen”, where there is bait, and exits into the “parlour”, where it is trapped from escape. Lobster pots are usually dropped to the sea floor about a dozen at a time, and are marked by a buoy so they can be picked up later.

— Freebase

Homarus gammarus

Homarus gammarus

Homarus gammarus, known as the European lobster or common lobster, is a species of clawed lobster from the eastern Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and parts of the Black Sea. It is closely related to the American lobster, H. americanus. It may grow to a length of 60 cm and a mass of 6 kilograms, and bears a conspicuous pair of claws. In life, the lobsters are blue, only becoming "lobster red" on cooking. Mating occurs in the summer, producing eggs which are carried by the females for up to a year before hatching into planktonic larvae. Homarus gammarus is a highly esteemed food, and is widely caught using lobster pots, mostly around the British Isles.

— Freebase

American lobster

American lobster

The American lobster, Homarus americanus, is a species of lobster found on the Atlantic coast of North America, chiefly from Labrador to New Jersey. Within North America, it is also known as the northern lobster or Maine lobster. It can reach a body length of 64 cm, and a mass of over 20 kilograms, making it the heaviest crustacean in the world. Its closest relative is the European lobster Homarus gammarus, which can be distinguished by its coloration and the lack of spines on the underside of the rostrum. American lobsters are usually bluish green to brown with red spines, but a number of color variations have been observed.

— Freebase

Squat toilet

Squat toilet

A squat toilet is a toilet used by squatting, rather than sitting. There are several types of squat toilets, but they all consist essentially of a hole in the ground. The only exception is a "pedestal" squat toilet, which is of the same height as a sitting toilet. It is also possible to squat over sitting toilets, but this requires extra care as they are not specifically designed for squatting.

— Freebase

Langostino

Langostino

Langostino is a Spanish word with different meanings in different areas. In the United States, it is commonly used in the restaurant trade to refer to the meat of the squat lobster, which is neither a true lobster nor a prawn. It is more closely related to porcelain crabs and hermit crabs. Crustaceans labeled as langostino are no more than 3 inches long, and weigh no more than 7 ounces. Langostinos are not langoustes despite a similar name. Also, langostinos are sometimes confused with langoustines, which is a true lobster common in European cuisine. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" as a market name for three species in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon. In Spain, it means some species of prawns. In Cuba and other Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands, the name langostino is also used to refer to crayfish. In South America, the name langostino is used to refer to red shrimp, Pleoticus muelleri.

— Freebase

Thenus

Thenus

Thenus orientalis is a species of slipper lobster from the Indian and Pacific oceans. T. orientalis is known by a number of common names. The United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization prefers the name flathead lobster, while the official Australian name is Bay lobster. In Australia, it is more widely known as the Moreton Bay bug after Moreton Bay, a location in Queensland. In Singapore, both the flathead lobster and true crayfish are confusingly called crayfish. They are popularly used in many Singaporean dishes. T. orientalis has a strongly depressed body, and grows to a maximum body length of 25 centimetres, or a carapace length of 8 cm. Thenus orientalis has an Indo-West Pacific distribution, ranging from the east coast of Africa to China, southern Japan, the Philippines and along the northern coast of Australia from Western Australia to Queensland. They are also caught on a small scale off the shores of Malaysia and Singapore.

— Freebase

Jasus edwardsii

Jasus edwardsii

Jasus edwardsii, the southern rock lobster, red rock lobster, or spiny rock lobster, is a species of spiny lobster found throughout coastal waters of southern Australia and New Zealand including the Chatham Islands. This species is commonly called crayfish or crays in New Zealand and kōura in Māori. They resemble lobsters, but lack the large characteristic pincers on the first pair of walking legs. Spiny rock lobsters are carnivorous, leaving their rock cover to venture out to feed during the night. They live in and around reefs at depths ranging from 5–200 metres deep at the continental shelf. They can be dark red and orange above with paler yellowish abdomens or grey-green brown with the paler underside. The more tropical animals tend to have the brighter colours. Adult carapaces can grow up to 230 millimetres in length and can often exceed 8 kilograms in under-fished areas.

— Freebase

Furry lobster

Furry lobster

Furry lobsters are small decapod crustaceans, closely related to the slipper lobsters and spiny lobsters. The antennae are not as enlarged as in spiny and slipper lobsters, and the body is covered in short hairs, hence the name furry lobster. Although previously considered a family in their own right, the furry lobsters were subsumed into the family Palinuridae in 1990, and molecular phylogenies support the inclusion of the furry lobsters in the family Palinuridae. There are two genera, with three species between them: ⁕Palinurellus gundlachi Von Martens, 1878 – Caribbean furry lobster, found in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic coast of South America; named for Juan Gundlach ⁕Palinurellus wieneckii – mole lobster, with an Indo-Pacific distribution ⁕Palibythus magnificus P. J. F. Davie, 1990 – musical furry lobster, from the South Pacific

— Freebase

Lobster

Lobster

any large macrurous crustacean used as food, esp. those of the genus Homarus; as the American lobster (H. Americanus), and the European lobster (H. vulgaris). The Norwegian lobster (Nephrops Norvegicus) is similar in form. All these have a pair of large unequal claws. The spiny lobsters of more southern waters, belonging to Palinurus, Panulirus, and allied genera, have no large claws. The fresh-water crayfishes are sometimes called lobsters

— Webster Dictionary

Shediac

Shediac

Shediac is a Canadian town in Westmorland County, New Brunswick. The town is known as the "Lobster Capital of the World" and hosts an annual festival every July which promotes its ties to lobster fishing. At the western entrance to the town is a 90-tonne sculpture called (perhaps inaccurately) The World's Largest Lobster.

— Wikipedia

Jasus lalandii

Jasus lalandii

Jasus lalandii (also called the Cape rock lobster or West Coast rock lobster) is a species of spiny lobster found off the coast of Southern Africa. It is not known whom the specific epithet lalandii commemorates, although it may be the French astronomer Jérôme Lalande.

— Wikipedia

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. cloistral
  • B. reclusive
  • C. secular
  • D. secluded