Synonyms containing starting-bolt

We've found 3,757 synonyms:

BOLT Solutions

BOLT Solutions

Headquartered in New York and founded in 2000, Bolt Solutions Inc. (formerly SeaPass Solutions, Inc.) offers the leading online sales and client service platform for anyone who wants to sell or buy insurance online. The Bolt Platform supports all of the insurance needs of its customers, while driving market share, retention and increased revenue for its insurance industry partners.SeaPass Solutions launched Bolt three years ago to be a better way for small business to choose and buy insurance online and in the process we created a Platform that is a better way for anyone to shop for and buy insurance. Bolt is the evolution of SeaPass and the Bolt brand representing all the elements that are important to SeaPass. Bolt is about speed, strength, agility (we pay attention to emerging trends), and proactive expertise in all things distribution. These are qualities that also represented the SeaPass spirit.With the Bolt Platform at the foundation of both this transition and our business, we are formally announcing its launch in conjunction with this name change. Following its successful implementation at some of the world's leading insurance carriers - including Hiscox USA - we're proud to broadly announce this online sales and client service platform for insurance products. The Bolt Platform includes all the technology, people, processes, and markets needed to support multi-channel, multi-carrier choice solutions for both consumers and insurance industry partners. The Bolt Platform allows insurance agents, brokers, wholesalers, and carriers to serve all of the insurance needs of their customers, while driving market share, retention and increasing revenue per customer.

— CrunchBase

Carriage bolt

Carriage bolt

A carriage bolt, coach bolt or round head square neck bolt is a form of bolt used to fasten metal to wood. It is distinguished from other bolts by its shallow mushroom head and that the shank cross-section of the bolt is circular for most of its length, as usual, but the portion immediately beneath the head is formed into a square section. This makes the bolt self-locking when placed through a square hole in a metal strap. This allows the fastener to be installed with only a single tool, a spanner or wrench, working from one side. The head of a carriage bolt is usually a shallow dome. The squared section is of the same size as the diameter of the bolt shank, with a plain unthreaded shank. Carriage bolts were developed for use through iron strengthening plates on either side of a wooden beam, the squared section fitting into a square hole in the ironwork. It is commonplace though to use them to bare timber, the squared section giving enough grip to prevent rotation. Carriage bolts are extensively used for security fixings, such as locks and hinges, where the bolt must only be removable from one side. The smooth domed head and square nut below prevent the carriage bolt from being unlocked from the insecure side.

— Wikipedia

Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt

Usain St Leo Bolt (; born 21 August 1986) is a Jamaican retired sprinter and world record holder in the 100 metres, 200 metres and 4 × 100 metres relay. His reign as Olympic Games champion in all of these events spans three Olympics. Due to his achievements and dominance in sprint competition, he is widely considered to be the greatest sprinter of all time.A nine-time Olympic gold medalist, Bolt won the 100 m, 200 m and 4 × 100 m relay at three consecutive Olympic Games, although he lost the 2008 relay gold medal about nine years after due to a teammate's doping disqualification. He gained worldwide fame for his double sprint victory in world record times at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, which made him the first person to hold both records since fully automatic time became mandatory. Bolt is the only sprinter to win Olympic 100 m and 200 m titles at three consecutive Olympics (2008, 2012 and 2016). An eleven-time World Champion, he won consecutive World Championship 100 m, 200 m and 4 × 100 metres relay gold medals from 2009 to 2015, with the exception of a 100 m false start in 2011. He is the most successful athlete of the World Championships, was the first athlete to win four World Championship titles in the 200 m and is the joint-most successful in the 100 m with three titles. Bolt improved upon his second 100 m world record of 9.69 with 9.58 seconds in 2009 – the biggest improvement since the start of electronic timing. He has twice broken the 200 metres world record, setting 19.30 in 2008 and 19.19 in 2009. He has helped Jamaica to three 4 × 100 metres relay world records, with the current record being 36.84 seconds set in 2012. Bolt's most successful event is the 200 m, with three Olympic and four World titles. The 2008 Olympics was his international debut over 100 m; he had earlier won numerous 200 m medals (including 2007 World Championship silver) and holds the world under-20 and world under-18 records for the event. His achievements as a sprinter have earned him the media nickname "Lightning Bolt", and his awards include the IAAF World Athlete of the Year, Track & Field Athlete of the Year, and Laureus World Sportsman of the Year (four times). Bolt retired after the 2017 World Championships, when he finished third in his last solo 100 m race, opted out of the 200m, and pulled up in the 4x100m relay final. Stating that it was his "dream" to play professional association football, in August 2018 Bolt began training with Australian football A-League club the Central Coast Mariners as a left-winger. On 12 October 2018, Bolt scored twice for the team in a friendly match.

— Wikipedia

Bolt action

Bolt action

Bolt action is a type of firearm action in which the weapon's bolt is operated manually by the opening and closing of the breech with a small handle, most commonly placed on the right-hand side of the weapon. As the handle is operated, the bolt is unlocked, the breech is opened, the spent cartridge case is withdrawn and ejected, the firing pin is cocked, and finally a new round/cartridge is placed into the breech and the bolt closed. Bolt action firearms are most often rifles, but there are some bolt-action shotguns and a few handguns as well. Examples of this system date as far back as the early 19th century, notably in the Dreyse needle gun. From the late 19th century, all the way through both World Wars, the bolt-action rifle was the standard infantry firearm for most of the world's militaries. In military and law enforcement use, the bolt action has been mostly replaced by semi-automatic and selective fire weapons, though the bolt action remains the dominant design in dedicated sniper rifles. Bolt action firearms are still very popular for hunting and target shooting. Compared to most other manually operated firearm actions, it offers an excellent balance of strength, ruggedness, reliability, and potential accuracy, all with light weight and much lower cost than self-loading firearms, and can also be disassembled and re-assembled much faster due to fewer moving parts. The major disadvantage is a marginally lower practical rate of fire than other manual repeating firearms, such as lever-action and pump-action, and a far lower practical rate of fire than semi-automatic weapons, but this is not an important factor in many types of hunting and target shooting.

— Freebase

Bolt

Bolt

bōlt, n. a bar or pin used to fasten a door, &c.: an arrow: a thunderbolt, as in 'a bolt from the blue.'—v.t. to fasten with a bolt: to throw or utter precipitately: to expel suddenly: to swallow hastily.—v.i. to rush away (like a bolt from a bow): to start up: (U.S.) to break away from one's political party.—ns. Bolt′-head, the head of a bolt: a chemical flask; Bolt′-rope, a rope sewed all round the edge of a sail to prevent it from tearing; Bolt′sprit (same as Bowsprit).—adv. Bolt′-up′right, upright and straight as a bolt or arrow.—n. Bolt′-up′rightness. [A.S. bolt; Old High Ger. bolz.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bolt cutter

Bolt cutter

A bolt cutter, sometimes called bolt cropper, is a tool used for cutting chains, padlocks, bolts and wire mesh. The original use for bolt cutters was as the name suggests to cut bolt seals from shipping containers at the delivery point. It typically has long handles and short blades, with compound hinges to maximize leverage and cutting force. A typical bolt cutter yields 20 kilonewtons of cutting force for a 250 newtons force on the handles. There are different types of cutting blades for bolt cutters, including angle cut, center cut, shear cut, and clipper cut blades. Bolt cutters are available usually in 12, 14, 18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 inches in length. The length is measured from the tip of the jaw to the end of the handle. ⁕Angle cut has the cutter head angled for easier insertion. Typical angling is 25 to 35 degrees. ⁕Center cut has the blades equidistant from the two faces of the blade. ⁕Shear cut has the blades inverted to each other. ⁕Clipper cut has the blades flush against one face. Bolt cutters with fiberglass handles can be used for cutting live electrical wires and are useful during rescue operations. The fiberglass handles have another advantage of being lighter in weight than the conventional drop forged or solid pipe handles.

— Freebase

Dead bolt

Dead bolt

A dead bolt or dead lock, is a locking mechanism distinct from a spring bolt lock because a deadbolt cannot be moved to the open position except by rotating the lock cylinder. The more common spring bolt lock uses a spring to hold the bolt in place, allowing retraction by applying force to the bolt itself. A deadbolt can therefore make a door more resistant to entry without the correct key. A deadbolt is often used to complement a spring-bolt lock on an entry door to a building.

— Freebase

Bolt

Bolt

A bolt is a mechanical part of a firearm that blocks the rear of the chamber while the propellant burns, but moves out of the way to allow another cartridge or shell to be inserted in the chamber. In manually operated firearms, such as bolt-action, lever-action, and pump-action rifles and shotguns, the bolt is held fixed by its locking lugs during firing, forcing all the expanding gas forward, and is manually withdrawn to chamber another round. In an automatic or semi-automatic firearm, the bolt cycles back and forward between each shot, propelled by recoil or expanding gas or the recoil spring. When it moves back, the extractor pulls the spent casing from the chamber. When it moves forward, it strips a cartridge from the magazine and pushes it into the chamber. Once the case is clear of the chamber, the ejector kicks the case out of the weapon. The extractor and firing pin are often integral parts of the bolt. The slide of a semi-automatic pistol is a form of bolt.

— Freebase

Socket wrench

Socket wrench

A socket wrench is a type of wrench or spanner that has a socket attached at one end, usually used to turn a fastener. The most prevalent form is the ratcheting socket wrench, often informally called a ratchet. A ratcheting socket wrench is the device within a hand tool in which a metal handle is attached to a ratcheting mechanism, which attaches to a socket. This in turn fits onto a type of bolt or nut. Pulled or pushed in one direction, the ratchet loosens or tightens the bolt or nut attached to the socket. Turned the other direction, the ratchet does not turn the socket but allows the ratchet handle to be re-positioned for another turn while staying attached to the bolt or nut. This ratcheting action allows the fastener to be rapidly tightened or loosened in small increments without disconnecting the tool from the fastener. A switch is built into the ratchet head that allows the user to apply the ratcheting action in either direction, as needed, to tighten or loosen a fastener. Other common methods of driving socket wrenches include pneumatic impact wrenches, hydraulic torque wrenches, torque multipliers and breaker bars. Some lesser known hybrid drivers include striking wrench tools with square drive, and hydraulic impact wrenches (typically powered by on site hydraulic power such as present with military tanks, and many rail car applications). Socket wrenches are most commonly hexagonal, or more commonly referred to as "6-point" in lay terms. Sockets are driven by being attached to the driving tool via a male/female square connection fitting (called the square drive). Standard sizes of square drives around the world include 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", 3/4", 1", 1-1/2", 2-1/2" and 3-1/2" square drive sizes (a de facto international standard with no metric equivalents) along with some lesser used drivers such as 5/8" square drive, and both #4 and #5 spline drives specified in ANSI B107 specifications. This wide range of square drive sizes provides for a wide variety of socket types and sizes to suit small to very large nuts and bolts. Some square drivers have a through hole to attach the socket to the driver (using a retaining ring with o-ring and pin type, or single piece molded retaining rings), a locking pin, or friction ball. Some common hand ratchets employ a quick release button on their top for quick socket release of smaller sockets.The tool chosen to drive the socket wrench ultimately supplies the mechanical advantage needed by the user to provide the torque needed to loosen or tighten the fastener as may be required. Larger drivers are typically used with higher torque, while smaller drivers are used for convenience in smaller low torque applications. Given the limits of human strength and fatigue, torque above 600 ft-lbs of torque will generally involve some kind of power assist, instead of the user simply pushing on the handle of a wrench. Very large sockets and drivers are typically powered by hydraulics to achieve torque. A socket is typically a cylinder which has a female six– or twelve-point recessed opening sized to fit over the common male hexagonal head of a bolt or nut fastener. The opposite end of the socket wrench has a standardized (ANSI B107, ISO, or other consensus standard) square recess to accept the socket wrench's drive size. Male drivers are also produced for use with socket head cap screws, and are often called Allen drivers (trademark) or the generic term male bit drivers The principal advantage of interchangeable sockets is that, instead of a separate wrench for each of the many different fastener sizes and types, only separate sockets are needed for each size and type. Because of their versatility, nearly all screw and bolt types now have sockets of different types made to fit their bolts or nuts. Sockets often come as a "socket set" with many different sizes or types of sockets to fit the heads of different-sized fasteners. A ratchet of the "set size" is often included with the socket set. Sockets are commonly available in fractional inch and metric sizes, and in short (shallow) and longer (deep) varieties.

— Wikipedia

Strike plate

Strike plate

A strike plate is a metal plate affixed to a door jamb with a hole or holes for the bolt of the door. When the door is closed, the bolt extends into the hole in the strike plate and holds the door closed. The strike plate protects the jamb against friction from the bolt and increases security in the case of a jamb made of a softer material than the strike plate. Some strike plates have their hole size and placement calculated so a spring-bolt extends into the hole, but an adjacent anti-retraction device remains depressed, preventing the bolt from being retracted unless the lock is turned.

— Freebase

Bolting

Bolting

Bolting is when agricultural and horticultural crops prematurely produce a flowering stem before the crop is harvested, in a natural attempt to produce seeds and hence reproduce. These flowering stems are usually vigorous extensions of existing leaf-bearing stems, and in order to produce them, a plant diverts resources away from producing the edible parts such as leaves or roots, resulting in a poor quality harvest from the grower's point of view. Plants that have produced flowering stems in this way are said to have bolted. Crops inclined to bolt include lettuce, beetroot, brassicas, spinach, celery and onion. Bolting is induced by plant hormones of the gibberellin family, and can occur as a result of several factors, including changes in day length, the prevalence of low temperatures at particular stages in a plant's growth cycle, and the existence of stresses such as insufficient water or minerals. These factors may interact in a complex way. Day length may affect the propensity to bolt in that some plants are "long day plants", some are "short day plants" and some are "day neutral", so for example when a long day plant, such as spinach, experiences increasingly long days that reach a particular length, it will be inclined to bolt. Low temperatures can affect the propensity of some plants to bolt if they are experienced for sufficient periods at particular points in the life cycle of the plant; once these conditions have been met, plants that require such a trigger will subsequently bolt regardless of subsequent temperatures. Plants under stress may respond by bolting so that they can produce seeds before they die.

— Freebase

gauld

gauld

When excessive friction on threads of a bolt and threads seize up and distort threads to the point they are torn off of bolt , hence faulted bolt threads.

— Editors Contribution

bolt circle

bolt circle

A theoretical circle on which the centerpoints of bolt holes lie when the bolt holes are positioned as equally spaced in a circle. Common examples are the bolt circle for the lugs on a car's wheel, or the bolts on a bolted joint between pipe flanges. Often abbreviated "BC" or "B.C." on engineering drawings. Often treated as a basic dimension, when true position for the centers is specified using GD&T.

— Wiktionary

wagon

wagon

A vehicle for the conveyance of goods or passengers, is mounted on four wheels, but varies considerably in the construction of its other parts, according to the species of traffic in which it is employed. They are used by armies for the transportation of subsistence, other military stores, baggage, ammunition, sick and wounded. The following wagon has been adopted for use in the service of the U. S. army: The body to be straight, 3 feet 6 inches wide, 1 foot 9 inches deep, 9 feet 6 inches long at the bottom, and 10 feet at the top, sloping equally at each end, all in the clear or inside; the floor 9 feet 101⁄2 inches long, 3 feet 6 inches wide, and 71⁄8 inches thick. Top sides 6 inches wide, 71⁄8 inches thick, 10 feet 2 inches long on the bottom edge, sloping the same as the lower side boards. Six bows of good ash or oak, 2 inches wide, 1⁄2 inch thick, with three staples to confine the ridge-pole to its place; one ridge-pole 11 feet 3 inches long, 13⁄4 inches wide, 5⁄8 inch thick; seat-boards 3 feet 6 inches long, 1 foot wide, 7⁄8 inch thick to rest on top edge of sides on upright spiral springs, so arranged as to be used with or without the top sides; two plates 7 inches long, 11⁄2 inches wide, 3⁄4 inch thick, with two bolts in each, for the front wheels to strike against in turning the wagon. The tongue to be 10 feet 6 inches long, 4 inches wide, 21⁄4 inches deep at front end of hounds, 13⁄4 inches wide, and 21⁄4 inches deep at point or front end, and so arranged as to lift up the front end of it to hang within 2 feet 6 inches of the ground when the wagon is standing at rest on a level surface; front hounds 6 feet long, 21⁄4 inches deep, 31⁄2 inches wide over axle, and to retain that width to the back end of tongue; jaws of hounds 1 foot 6 inches long and 21⁄4 inches square at the front end. Axle-stock 4 feet 1⁄2 inch long, 31⁄2 inches wide, 31⁄4 inches deep. Hind hounds 4 feet 11 inches long, 21⁄4 inches deep, and 23⁄4 inches wide back, and 21⁄2 inches wide front; jaws 10 inches long and 4 inches wide at the end where they rest on coupling-pole. Coupling-pole 8 feet 9 inches long, 31⁄2 inches wide, 23⁄8 inches deep, with a rivet through front end. Wheels 3 feet 8 inches and 4 feet 8 inches high; sixteen spokes 2 inches wide and 2 inches thick at hub, and 2 inches wide and 11⁄2 inches thick at felloes; eight felloes 2 inches wide, 23⁄8 inches deep; hubs 9 inches diameter at flanges, 31⁄2 inches diameter at front, 4 inches diameter at back end, 12 inches long; tires 2 inches wide, 1⁄2 inch thick, fastened with 8 screw-bolts, one in each felloe. Distance from the centre of king-bolt hole to centre of back axle, 5 feet 91⁄2 inches; and from centre of king-bolt hole to the centre of bolt in jaw of hind hounds, 1 foot 10 inches; distance from the centre of hind axle to centre of bolt in jaw of hind hounds, 3 feet 111⁄2 inches, and from the centre of king-bolt to centre of slider 2 feet 21⁄2 inches; distance between the inside of front and hind standards, 5 feet 81⁄2 inches,—to receive the body, which is 5 feet 8 inches from outside to outside of cleats of sides. Weight of model wagon, 1325 pounds, complete, for four horses or mules. See Ordnance, Carriages for, Traveling Kitchen, and Traveling Forge.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Sex bolt

Sex bolt

A sex bolt, also known as a barrel nut, barrel bolt, Chicago screw or post and screw, is a type of fastener which has a barrel-shaped flange and protruding boss that is internally threaded. The boss sits within the components being fastened, and the flange provides the bearing surface. The sex bolt and accompanying machine screw sit flush on either side of the surfaces being fastened. It is normally chosen because of its low profile compared to other nuts. The sex bolt often has a built-in feature, such as a slot, to aid in tightening the fastener. Some sex bolts, more commonly known as architectural bolts, have knurled barrels to allow one-sided assembly. Binding posts are similar to architectural bolts in that they are designed to be assembled from one side, but they have teeth on the flanged surface to keep them fixed. They were originally designed for the printing industry to bind large catalogs together.

— Freebase

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "grievous"?
  • A. deplorable
  • B. baleful
  • C. trifling
  • D. afflictive