Synonyms containing stupid is as stupid does

We've found 8,452 synonyms:

KISS principle

KISS principle

KISS is an acronym for "Keep it simple, stupid" as a design principle noted by the U.S. Navy in 1960. The KISS principle states that most systems work best if they are kept simple rather than made complex; therefore simplicity should be a key goal in design and unnecessary complexity should be avoided. The phrase has been associated with aircraft engineer Kelly Johnson. The term "KISS principle" was in popular use by 1970. Variations on the phrase include "keep it stupid simple", "keep it short and simple", "keep it simple sir", "keep it super simple", "keep it simple or be stupid", "keep it simple and stupid", "keep it simple and straightforward", "keep it simple and safe", "Keep it simple student", "keep it simple, silly", "keep it simple and sincere" or "keep it simple and secular."

— Freebase

Recordings

Recordings

Recordings is a compilation album by British progressive rock band Porcupine Tree, first released in May 2001. It is a collection of b-sides from the Stupid Dream and Lightbulb Sun album's recording sessions. It is notable that two songs from these eras, titled: "I Fail" and "Novak", were excluded from this release. The former was an unreleased song from the Stupid Dream sessions which was present on a rare 1997 release titled "Demo"; a compilation composed of demos from Stupid Dream which was made to promote the album. The latter was an instrumental b-side from Lightbulb Sun sessions, which was released on the vinyl edition of the Shesmovedon single. Recordings was originally a limited release, limited to only 20,000 copies worldwide. It was later reissued on CD in September, 2010, and as double vinyl in January, 2011.

— Freebase

military necessity

military necessity

As understood by modern civilized nations, consists in the necessity of those measures which are indispensable for securing the ends of war, and which are lawful according to the modern law and usages of war. Military necessity admits of all direct destruction of life or limb of armed enemies, and of other persons whose destruction is incidentally unavoidable in the armed contests of war; it allows of the capturing of every armed enemy, and every enemy of importance to the hostile government, or of peculiar danger to the captor; it allows of all destruction of property, and obstruction of the ways and channels of traffic, travel, or communication, and of all withholding of sustenance or means of life from the enemy; of the appropriation of whatever an enemy’s country affords necessary for the subsistence and safety of the army, and of such deception as does not involve the breaking of good faith, either positively pledged, regarding agreements entered into during the war, or supposed by the modern law of war to exist. Men who take up arms against one another in public war do not cease on this account to be moral beings, responsible to one another, and to God. Military necessity does not admit of cruelty, that is, the infliction of suffering for the sake of suffering, or for revenge, or of maiming or wounding, except in fight, or of torture to extort confessions. It does not admit of the use of poison in any way, or of the wanton devastation of a district. It admits of deception, but disclaims acts of perfidy; and in general, military necessity does not include any act of hostility which makes the return to peace unnecessarily difficult.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

ScoreFeeder

ScoreFeeder

ScoreFeeder is here! With our exciting new utility, high school coaches, managers, and statisticians will be able to enter their data once, then broadcast it to unlimited newspapers and media outlets in their desired format via customized email. You can also broadcast to friends, family, and interested parties with the same click of a button.Scorefeeder has a great memory too. It will remember your player names, your media choices, and selections from one game to the next so that you NEVER ENTER THE SAME INFORMATION TWICE!Get your free account today and start broadcasting your scores!Want to learn more? See our frequently asked questions below:What is ScoreFeeder? Why use ScoreFeeder? What does “enter it once” mean? How much does it cost? Is there a limit to where my data goes? What if my newspaper is not on the list? What if my newspaper wants a different format? What happens to the data? How do the media and others receive the data? How does Instant Update work? Can we advertise on ScoreFeeder?What is ScoreFeeder? We are a utility portal that allows high schools and sports teams to enter their scores and statistics once, then have it broadcast to any media site that they choose.Why use ScoreFeeder? Because it is the most efficient way to submit scores to the media, and to friends and family of your program.What does “enter it once” mean? Users of ScoreFeeder will only enter their roster once, enter their media selections once, and enter their scores once, then they will be broadcast where-ever they desire.How much does it cost? Accounts are free and allow a team to store their roster, and broadcast their scores to an unlimited number of media and friends.Is there a limit to where my data goes? No, you can broadcast to any media outlet, or individual who has an email address.What if my newspaper is not on the list? Just enter its email address, then you may use ScoreFeeder to submit scores immediately. They will receive the default format.What if my newspaper wants a different format? Contact us with the desired format template and we will build it for you.What happens to the data? Your data will be broadcast to the media sources that you choose, and to any other email addresses that you enter. In addition, we intend to encourage media sites to use our data in order to promote our users, and players. Data will be searchable via web search engines. We will publish the box scores to our site on a daily basis.How do the media and others receive the data? They will receive a customized email with your data in box score format.How does Instant Update work? Coaches who select the Instant Update function will receive an email with all scores from their conference, for their sport as soon as they are broadcast through ScoreFeeder. Instant Update is the absolutely fastest way to find out what is going on in your conference.Can we advertise on ScoreFeeder? Absolutely! Just complete the Advertising Information for more information and pricing.

— CrunchBase

HHead

HHead

hHead were a Canadian alternative rock band, formed in 1991 in Toronto.The band was originally formed by Noah Mintz and Brendan Canning as an acoustic duo, with a rotating succession of drummers rounding out the trio after they evolved into a harder rock band. They were originally known as Head, but added the second h after discovering that another band was already recording as Head, although both hHead and the Vancouver band Rymes with Orange regularly joked in promotional interviews that the extra h had been traded between the bands by either donation or theft.The band's first album, Fireman, was released independently in 1992, and became popular on Canadian campus radio. It received wider distribution in 1993, and the band toured Canada both as a headliner in rock clubs and as an opening act for My Bloody Valentine, Sloan, Dinosaur Jr. and Stone Temple Pilots.In 1993, the band won CFNY-FM's Discovery to Disc contest, which awarded them $100,000 toward the recording of a new album. The band landed a contract with IRS Records in 1994, releasing their second album, Jerk, that year. The album was supported by a large-scale national tour as an opening act for Moist, and by an appearance on the Edgefest bill in 1995. However, IRS Records was at this point in financial trouble, and declared bankruptcy in 1996. The band then moved to the Canadian independent label Handsome Boy Records for their final album, Ozzy.The band also appeared on at least two compilation albums during their career, with a cover of Bob Snider's "They Oughta Bottle Friday Night" appearing on the 1996 tribute album Poetreason: The Songs of Bob Snider and the non-album track "Want" appearing on both the 1996 and 1998 editions of More of Our Stupid Noise. In 2015, the previously unreleased track "Fempire" and a solo track by Canning titled "Born from the Ashes" appeared on Squirtgun Records' 20th anniversary Return of Our Stupid Noise compilation.The band broke up in 1997.Mintz is now a mastering engineer for artists such as Hayden and The Dears, and has recorded solo material as Noah's Arkweld. Canning joined By Divine Right for that band's third album Bless This Mess, and later formed the bands Broken Social Scene with Kevin Drew and Cookie Duster with Bernard Maiezza. Broken Social Scene's album Bee Hives includes a song titled "hHallmark", alluding to the unique typography of hHead's name.

— Wikipedia

My Girlfriend

My Girlfriend

"My Girlfriend" is a song by the Christian rock band Relient K, released on their self-titled first album. The song originally appeared as "Marilyn Manson Ate My Girlfriend" on the band's demo album, All Work and No Play. The song is about Marilyn Manson eating Matt Thiessen's girlfriend. Thiessen wrote this song when he was 15 years old. Thiessen has said that he wrote it because of a female friend, who lived eight hours away in Pennsylvania, who he would talk to about many things including spiritual matters such as where God was taking them in the future. His friend would later turn from Christian music to Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson. In an interview with CCM Magazine Thiessen stated "through this she changed her lifestyle [and] what she believed in." His friend would later be expelled from school and would be kicked out of her house where should be sent to a youth detention center. Thiessen would later state "She felt that Christianity was stupid and just this big hypocrisy. Being young and impressionable, I just wrote this little, stupid song, but that was the way I dealt with it—writing this song about how she got so consumed by Marilyn Manson." The song caused controversy among the Christian music world. Thiessen has stated the "Some moms didn’t want their kids listening to our records and stuff, but that’s expected. People look for stuff like that sometimes just because they want to be safe all the time." When asked if the band still played the song Thiessen stated "We’re a little tired of it, but it’s still a fun song. You know how a lot of bands have their cliché one song about a girl, the relationship that went wrong or all that stuff? We don’t actually have any of those right now. I think we may in the future. You never know how it goes." In an interview in Detroit at the 2005 Warped Tour, Thiessen stated the song was retired from being performed live in 2002 during their Australian tour.

— Freebase

Dote

Dote

dōt, v.i. (arch.) to be stupid or foolish: to be weakly affectionate: to show excessive love—formerly also spelt Doat.—ns. Dōt′age, a doting: childishness of old age: excessive fondness; Dōt′ant (Shak.), a dotard; Dōt′ard, one who dotes: one showing the weakness of old age, or excessive fondness.—adj. Dōt′ed (Spens.), stupid.—n. Dōt′er, one who dotes.—p.adj. and n. Dōt′ing.—adjs. Dōt′ish, silly; Dot′tle (Scot.), stupid.—n. a dotard.—adj. Dot′ty, feeble in mind: tottering. [Old Dut. doten, to be silly, Scot. doitet, stupid; Fr. radoter, to rave, is from the same root.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Thick

Thick

thik, adj. dense: imperfectly mobile: compact: not transparent or clear: misty: dull, mentally clouded: crowded: closely set: abundant: frequent, in quick succession: having great depth or circumference: (coll.) in fast friendship.—n. the thickest part of anything: a stupid person.—adv. closely: frequently: fast: to a great depth.—adjs. Thick′-and-thin, thorough, completely devoted; Thick′-com′ing (Shak.), coming fast or close together.—v.t. Thick′en, to make thick or close: to strengthen.—v.i. to become thick or obscure: to crowd or press.—ns. Thick′ening, something put into a liquid or mass to make it more thick; Thick′et, a collection of trees or shrubs thickly or closely set: close wood or copse.—adjs. Thick′-head′ed, having a thick head or skull: stupid; Thick′ish, somewhat thick.—n. Thick′-knee, a stone-plover.—adj. Thick′-lipped (Shak.), having thick lips.—adv. Thick′ly.—n. Thick′ness.—adjs. Thick′-pleached (Shak.), closely interwoven; Thick′-set, closely planted: having a short, thick body.—n. Thick′-skin, a person wanting sensibility: a dull, stupid person, a blockhead.—adj. Thick′-skinned, having a thick skin: wanting sensibility: dull: obtuse.—n. Thick′-skull (same as Thick-skin).—adjs. Thick′-skulled, having a thick skull: dull: stupid; Thick′-sprung (Shak.), that have sprung up thick or close together.—n. Thick′un (slang), a sovereign: a crown.—Lay it on thick, to flatter or praise extravagantly; Through thick and thin, in spite of all obstacles, without any wavering. [A.S. thicce; cog. with Ger. dick.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Non

Non

non, adv. not, a Latin word used as a prefix, as in ns. Non-abil′ity, want of ability; Non-accept′ance, want of acceptance: refusal to accept; Non-ac′cess (law), absence of opportunity for marital commerce; Non-acquaint′ance, want of acquaintance; Non-acquiesc′ence, refusal of acquiescence; Non-admiss′ion, refusal of admission: failure to be admitted; Non-alienā′tion, state of not being alienated: failure to alienate; Non-appear′ance, failure or neglect to appear, esp. in a court of law; Non-arrī′val, failure to arrive; Non-attend′ance, a failure to attend: absence; Non-atten′tion, inattention; Non′-claim, a failure to make claim within the time limited by law; Non-com′batant, any one connected with an army who is there for some other purpose than that of fighting, as a surgeon, &c.: a civilian in time of war.—adjs. Non-commiss′ioned, not having a commission, as an officer in the army below the rank of commissioned officer—abbrev. Non-com′.; Non-commit′tal, unwilling to commit one's self to any particular opinion or course of conduct, free from any declared preference or pledge.—ns. Non-commū′nicant, one who abstains from joining in holy communion, or who has not yet communicated; Non-commūn′ion; Non-complī′ance, neglect or failure of compliance.—adj. Non-comply′ing.—n. Non-concur′rence, refusal to concur.—adj. Non-conduct′ing, not conducting or transmitting: not allowing a fluid or a force to pass along, as glass does not conduct electricity.—n. Non-conduct′or, a substance which does not conduct or transmit certain properties or conditions, as heat or electricity.—adj. Nonconform′ing, not conforming, esp. to an established church.—n. and adj. Nonconform′ist, one who does not conform: esp. one who refused to conform or subscribe to the Act of Uniformity in 1662—abbrev. Non-con′.—n. Nonconform′ity, want of conformity, esp. to the established church.—adj. Non-contā′gious, not infectious.—ns. Non′-content, one not content: in House of Lords, one giving a negative vote; Non-deliv′ery, failure or neglect to deliver.—adj. Non-effect′ive, not efficient or serviceable: unfitted for service.—n. a member of a force who is not able, for some reason, to take part in active service.—adj. Non-effic′ient, not up to the mark required for service.—n. a soldier who has not yet undergone the full number of drills.—n. Non-ē′go, in metaphysics, the not-I, the object as opposed to the subject, whatever is not the conscious self.—adjs.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

stupid

stupid

To act crazy. "Everywhere we go it's a party yall, we gonna get it crackin like it's Mardi Gras. Go stupid. Go stupid. Go stupid. Come and go stupid with me." (Go Stupid by Mac Dre)

— Rap Dictionary

Pascals wager

Pascals wager

An argument for theism maintaining that belief in God poses less risk if God does not exist than does eternal damnation for the atheist if God does exist.

— Wiktionary

Neil Godwin

Neil Godwin

Neil Godwin is a fictional character in the BBC sitcom, The Office, played by Patrick Baladi. Neil first appeared in the first episode of the second series of the show as the UK Manager of Wernham Hogg, newly promoted from manager of the Swindon branch, thus making him David Brent's new boss. He was mentioned by name in some episodes of the first series but he did not make an appearance. At the start of the second series it is established that Neil has been promoted to the position of UK General Manager to replace Jennifer Taylor-Clarke, the job that Brent was initially offered but did not get due to failing a medical test. Neil's Swindon staff are transferred to Brent's Slough branch, and Neil comes with them. It immediately becomes apparent that Neil is all the things that Brent imagines he is himself – charming, humorous and popular. His introductory speech in the first episode of the second series makes everyone laugh. The former Swindon employees respect him for making them work hard. He personally makes lemon drizzle cakes for his employees' birthdays. Chris Finch, Brent's hero, looks up to him and "borrows" his best jokes. The motivational speakers who recruit Brent are immediately interested in recruiting Neil too. He is a great dancer, as he demonstrates with a Saturday Night Fever routine in the fifth episode of the second series. Brent is naturally jealous and resentful, and tries to upstage him at every opportunity. Inevitably Brent just ends up making himself look ridiculous, most notably when he does a dance of his own after Neil's. For the most part Neil responds to Brent's antics with apparent indifference or bemusement, although he is brusque and assertive after Brent calls him pathetic for socializing with the staff – which Brent has been failing miserably to do himself. Professional relations deteriorate rapidly between them as well. Neil reprimands Brent for failing to ensure the former Swindon employees are paid on time and for paying more attention to his motivational speaking "gigs" than staff performance and profits, which Brent seems indifferent to. Finally Brent virtually defies Neil to fire him, which he does. In the Christmas Special, Neil is clearly annoyed that Brent is continuing to hang around the Slough office. He bars further visits, and a less than pleasant side to his character emerges when he says he is looking forward to meeting Brent's blind date at the Christmas party, guessing almost correctly that Brent will in fact turn up by himself. He is, in other words, setting up Brent for more humiliation and seems somewhat disappointed when Carol, Brent's date, turns out to be attractive, friendly and witty. Arguably, Neil sets up Chris Finch's "dog" comment about Carol by asking David about the Labrador he brought in earlier, and he immediately laughs at Chris's joke after he makes it. When Brent finally stands up to Chris by telling him to "Fuck off," Neil gives a furtive, embarrassed glance in the direction of the camera, telling the viewer that he knows it has backfired on him. Brent might have made himself look stupid, but after managing to come across as a down-to-earth, nice man for most of the series, Neil has now made himself look deliberately malicious. This is not the first time his association with Finch works to the detriment of Neil's own affable, politically correct persona: Finch's jokes, which are routinely stolen, or in Chris' words "borrowed" from Neil, are usually offensive and in poor taste. In an interview with The A.V. Club in January 2007, Ricky Gervais (who created the show and played Brent) said he found Neil to be an unsympathetic figure. There's only two people you shouldn't like, and that's Neil and Chris Finch. Finch is a bully, he's one of those people who comes into a room and takes the piss out of someone else, and you laugh, but really you know it's your turn next. And Neil you shouldn't like, because he doesn't care. He was better than David Brent at his job, but it meant less to him than it did to David Brent.

— Wikipedia

Infidel

Infidel

one who does not believe in the prevailing religious faith; especially, one who does not believe in the divine origin and authority of Christianity; a Mohammedan; a heathen; a freethinker

— Webster Dictionary

Nonconformist

Nonconformist

one who does not conform to an established church; especially, one who does not conform to the established church of England; a dissenter

— Webster Dictionary

Nonconstat

Nonconstat

it does not appear; it is not plain or clear; it does not follow

— Webster Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. unpracticed
  • B. callow
  • C. experient
  • D. new