Synonyms containing take nourishment

We've found 8,262 synonyms:

Take

Take

tāk, v.t. to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with.—v.i. to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:—pa.t. took; pa.p. tā′ken.n. quantity of fish taken or captured at one time.—ns. Take′-in, an imposition, fraud: that by which one is deceived; Take′-off, a burlesque representation of any one; Tā′ker; Tā′king, act of taking or gaining possession: a seizing: agitation, excitement: (Spens. sickness: (Shak.) witchery: malignant influence.—adj. captivating: alluring.—adv. Tā′kingly.—n. Tā′kingness, quality of being taking or attractive.—adj. Tā′ky, attractive.—Take advantage of, to employ to advantage: to make use of circumstances to the prejudice of; Take after, to follow in resemblance; Take air, to be disclosed or made public; Take breath, to stop in order to breathe, to be refreshed; Take care, care of (see Care); Take down, to reduce: to bring down from a higher place, to lower: to swallow: to pull down: to write down; Take for, to mistake; Take French leave (see French); Take from, to derogate or detract from; Take heed, to be careful; Take heed to, to attend to with care; Take in, to enclose, to embrace: to receive: to contract, to furl, as a sail: to comprehend: to accept as true: to cheat: (Shak.) to conquer; Take in hand, to undertake; Take into one's head, to be seized with a sudden notion; Take in vain, to use with unbecoming levity or profaneness; Take in with, to deceive by means of; Take it out of, to extort reparation from: to exhaust the strength or energy of; Take leave (see Leave); Taken in, deceived, cheated; Take notice, to observe: to show that observation is made: (with of) to remark upon; Take off, to remove: to swallow: to mimic or imitate; Take on, to take upon: to claim a character: (coll.) to grieve; Take orders, to receive ordination; Take order with (Bacon), to check; Take out, to remove from within: to deduct: (Shak.) to copy; Take part, to share; Take place, to happen: to prevail; Take root, to strike out roots, to live and grow, as a plant: to be established; Take the field, to begin military operations; Take the wall of, to pass on the side nearest the wall: to get the advantage of; Take to, to apply to: to resort to: to be fond of; Take to heart, to feel sensibly; Take up, to lift, to raise: (Shak.) to borrow money, to buy on credit, to make up a quarrel: to employ, occupy or fill: to arrest: to comprise; Take up arms, to commence to fight; Take upon, to assume; Take up with, to be pleased or contented with, to form a connection with, to fall in love with: to lodge; Take with, to be pleased with. [M. E. taken—Scand.; Ice. taka pa.t. tók, pa.p. tekinn); conn. with L. tangĕre, tetig-i, to touch, and with Eng. tack.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Beach nourishment

Beach nourishment

Beach nourishment— also referred to as beach renourishment, beach replenishment or sand replenishment —describes a process by which sediment lost through longshore drift or erosion is replaced from sources outside of the eroding beach. A wider beach can reduce storm damage to coastal structures by dissipating energy across the surf zone, protecting upland structures and infrastructure from storm surges, tsunamis and unusually high tides. Beach nourishment is typically part of a larger coastal defense scheme. Nourishment is typically a repetitive process, since it does not remove the physical forces that cause erosion, but simply mitigates their effects. The first nourishment project in the U.S. was at Coney Island, New York in 1922-23 and is now a common shore protection measure utilized by public and private entities. Nourishment is one of three commonly accepted methods for protecting shorelines. The structural alternative involves constructing a seawall, revetment, groin or breakwater. Alternatively, with "managed retreat" the shoreline is left to erode, while relocating buildings and infrastructure further inland.

— Freebase

take

take

To lay hold of; to seize. To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to capture; to make prisoner. To attack; to seize; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship. To take aim, to direct the eye or weapon; to aim. To take arms, to commence war or hostilities. To take advantage of, to avail one’s self of any peculiar event or opening, whereby an army may be overcome. To take ground to the right or left, is to extend a line, or to move troops in either of those directions. To take down, is to commit to paper that which is spoken by another. To take on, an expression in familiar use among soldiers that have enlisted for a limited period, to signify an extension of service by re-enlisting. To take the field, is to encamp, to commence the operations of a campaign. To take up, to seize; to catch; to arrest; as, to take up a deserter. To take up quarters, to occupy locally; to go into cantonments, barracks, etc.; to become stationary for more or less time. To take up the gauntlet, is to accept a challenge.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Hypertrophy

Hypertrophy

hī-per′tro-fi, n. over-nourishment: the state of an organ or part of the body when it grows too large from over-nourishment.—adjs. Hypertroph′ic, -al, Hyper′trophied, Hyper′trophous. [Gr. hyper, above, trophē, nourishment.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Self-fashioning

Self-fashioning

Self-fashioning, a term introduced by Stephen Greenblatt (Renaissance,Self-Fashioning, 1980), is used to describe the process of constructing one's identity and public persona according to a set of socially acceptable standards. Greenblatt described the process in the Renaissance era where a noble man was instructed to dress in the finest clothing he could afford, to be well versed and educated in art, literature, sports, and other culturally determined noble exercises, and to generally compose himself in a carefully intended manner. Additionally, the relationship between self-fashioning and the aesthetic mediums was a reciprocal one. Just as the art of creating oneself was highly influenced by the art and literature of the time, such as conduct books and religious iconography, such a concern for one's outwardly projected image was reflected in the portraiture of the time. According to Greenblatt, during the Renaissance the upper class practiced self-fashioning. Prescribed attire and behavior was created for the noblemen and women, and were represented through portraits. The ideological traits portraying masculinity were symbols of authority and power. Male rulers depicted themselves in armor or with weapons. The most important characteristic attributed to women was beauty. Beauty represents the concepts of purity, virtue and modesty. In portraits, women performed these traits through idealized features, fancy dresses, and elaborate jewelry. The iconography of portraits displays the gender-specific qualities prescribed during the Renaissance through visual devices. The Book of the Courtier, by Baldassare Castiglione, is one of the first texts that depicted behaviors which individuals were expected to adopt in society. As an informal book of conduct, The Courtier included instructions on how people of the noble class were to dress and speak, as well as general rules of interaction to follow in social situations. In his article "The Semiotics of Masculinity in Renaissance England", David Kuchta discusses the role of The Courtier concerning its influence on the self-fashioning of Renaissance England. Men of the noble class were to "create" themselves as works of art, according to the conventions of dress and manner as set forth by the monarchs. Characteristics of this Renaissance self-fashioning involve the use of "feminine" aspects of dress and conduct. A man was to conduct and dress in a way that reflected his position in society. He was not supposed to act in an affected manner, but present naturalness and nonchalance, or sprezzatura. In addition to, The Courtier puts emphasis on the importance of not only trying to resemble one's master, but actually trying to transform himself into his master in a way that exercises sprezzatura. This presents a key theme in self-fashioning: the conscious effort to strive to imitate a praised model in society. For women, one of the most popular figures to imitate was the Virgin Mary. Margaret R. Miles provides a thorough analysis of this influence-through-images of iconography and art in her article "The Virgin's One Bare Breast". The bare breast symbolized nourishment in a time of famine. Depicting the Virgin Mary nursing the infant Christ encouraged women to aspire to provide the same nourishment for their own families and community. Miles goes on to explain that, although women were encouraged to strive to emulate the many virtues of the Virgin, they must also be aware that one could never fully achieve such a standard. Similarly, men were taught that they should follow in the image of Christ, which was believed to be more attainable. Greenblatt's theories are influenced by the French sociologist and historian Michel Foucault. Self-fashioning has implications and applications outside of Renaissance studies. Waleska Schwandt applies the theory to Oscar Wilde in a chapter of the book The Importance of Reinventing Oscar: Versions of Wilde during the Last 100 Years, edited by Uwe Boker et al. (New York and Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2002). Alvina E. Quintana uses the theory to analyse twentieth century Chicano literature (see "Ana Castillo's The Mixquiahuala Letters", in Criticism in the Borderlands: Studies in Chicano Literature, Culture and Ideology, Hector Calderon and Jose David Saldivar (eds), Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1991, pp. 72–83). Jack Chen applies the concept to the writings of Emperor Taizong in a book titled the Poetics of Sovereignty: on Emperor Taizong of the Tang Dynasty, (Boston, Mass: Harvard University Asia Center, 2011). In a chapter of the 2018 textbook International Perspectives on Theorizing Aspirations: Applying Bourdieu’s Tools, edited by Garth Stahl et al. (London, UK: Bloomsbury, 2018, pp. 44) in Steven Threadgold's chapter Bourdieu Is Not A Determinist, Guy Mankowski applies the theory with reference to punk music, where self-fashioning is re-appropriated as 'self-design'.

— Wikipedia

Renenutet

Renenutet

Renenūtet (also transliterated Ernūtet and Renenet) was a goddess of nourishment and the harvest in ancient Egyptian religion. The importance of the harvest caused people to make many offerings to Renenutet during harvest time. Initially, her cult was centered in Terenuthis. Renenutet was depicted as a cobra, or as a woman with the head of a cobra. The verbs 'to fondle, to nurse, or rear' help explain the name Renenutet. This goddess was a 'nurse' who took care of the pharaoh from birth to death.She was the female counterpart of Shai, "destiny", who represented the positive destiny of the child. Along with this, Renenutet was also the Thermouthis, or Hermouthis in Greek. She embodied the fertility of the fields and was the protecter of the royal office and power.Sometimes, as the goddess of nourishment, Renenutet was seen as having a husband, Sobek. He was represented as the Nile River, the annual flooding of which deposited the fertile silt that enabled abundant harvests. The temple of Medinet Madi is dedicated to both Sobek and Renenutet. It is a small and decorated building in the Faiyum. More usually, Renenutet was seen as the mother of Nehebkau, who occasionally was represented as a snake also. When considered the mother of Nehebkau, Renenutet was seen as having a husband, Geb, who represented the Earth. She was the mother of the god Nepri.Later, as a snake-goddess worshiped over the whole of Lower Egypt, Renenutet was increasingly associated with Wadjet, Lower Egypt's powerful protector and another snake goddess represented as a cobra. Eventually Renenutet was identified as an alternate form of Wadjet, whose gaze was said to slaughter enemies. Wadjet was the cobra shown on the crown of the pharaohs.

— Wikipedia

Foster

Foster

relating to nourishment; affording, receiving, or sharing nourishment or nurture; -- applied to father, mother, child, brother, etc., to indicate that the person so called stands in the relation of parent, child, brother, etc., as regards sustenance and nurture, but not by tie of blood

— Webster Dictionary

Innutrition

Innutrition

in-nū-trish′un, n. want of nutrition: failure of nourishment.—adj. Innutrit′ious, not nutritious: without nourishment.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

haustorium

haustorium

A root of a parasitic plant modified to take nourishment from its host.

— Wiktionary

take

take

The draught of fishes in a single drag of the net. Also, to take, in a military sense, to take or adopt any particular formation, as to take open order, or to take ground to the right or the left.--To take an astronomical observation, so to ascertain the position of a celestial body as to learn from it the place of the ship.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

victual

victual

take in nourishment

— Princeton's WordNet

vuram

vuram

Nourishment

— Editors Contribution

Fast

Fast

to abstain from food; to omit to take nourishment in whole or in part; to go hungry

— Webster Dictionary

Fast

Fast

abstinence from food; omission to take nourishment

— Webster Dictionary

Sitophobia

Sitophobia

a version to food; refusal to take nourishment

— Webster Dictionary

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
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