Synonyms containing take offense

We've found 8,561 synonyms:

Take

Take

tāk, v.t. to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with.—v.i. to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:—pa.t. took; pa.p. tā′ken.n. quantity of fish taken or captured at one time.—ns. Take′-in, an imposition, fraud: that by which one is deceived; Take′-off, a burlesque representation of any one; Tā′ker; Tā′king, act of taking or gaining possession: a seizing: agitation, excitement: (Spens. sickness: (Shak.) witchery: malignant influence.—adj. captivating: alluring.—adv. Tā′kingly.—n. Tā′kingness, quality of being taking or attractive.—adj. Tā′ky, attractive.—Take advantage of, to employ to advantage: to make use of circumstances to the prejudice of; Take after, to follow in resemblance; Take air, to be disclosed or made public; Take breath, to stop in order to breathe, to be refreshed; Take care, care of (see Care); Take down, to reduce: to bring down from a higher place, to lower: to swallow: to pull down: to write down; Take for, to mistake; Take French leave (see French); Take from, to derogate or detract from; Take heed, to be careful; Take heed to, to attend to with care; Take in, to enclose, to embrace: to receive: to contract, to furl, as a sail: to comprehend: to accept as true: to cheat: (Shak.) to conquer; Take in hand, to undertake; Take into one's head, to be seized with a sudden notion; Take in vain, to use with unbecoming levity or profaneness; Take in with, to deceive by means of; Take it out of, to extort reparation from: to exhaust the strength or energy of; Take leave (see Leave); Taken in, deceived, cheated; Take notice, to observe: to show that observation is made: (with of) to remark upon; Take off, to remove: to swallow: to mimic or imitate; Take on, to take upon: to claim a character: (coll.) to grieve; Take orders, to receive ordination; Take order with (Bacon), to check; Take out, to remove from within: to deduct: (Shak.) to copy; Take part, to share; Take place, to happen: to prevail; Take root, to strike out roots, to live and grow, as a plant: to be established; Take the field, to begin military operations; Take the wall of, to pass on the side nearest the wall: to get the advantage of; Take to, to apply to: to resort to: to be fond of; Take to heart, to feel sensibly; Take up, to lift, to raise: (Shak.) to borrow money, to buy on credit, to make up a quarrel: to employ, occupy or fill: to arrest: to comprise; Take up arms, to commence to fight; Take upon, to assume; Take up with, to be pleased or contented with, to form a connection with, to fall in love with: to lodge; Take with, to be pleased with. [M. E. taken—Scand.; Ice. taka pa.t. tók, pa.p. tekinn); conn. with L. tangĕre, tetig-i, to touch, and with Eng. tack.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pro set

Pro set

In American football, the pro set or split backs formation is a formation that was commonly used as a "base" set by professional and amateur teams. The "pro set" formation featured a backfield that deployed two running backs aligned side-by-side instead of one in front of the other as in traditional I-formation sets. It was an outgrowth of the original, three running back T-formation, with the third back (one of the halfbacks) in the T becoming a permanent flanker, now referred to as a wide receiver. This formation was particularly popular because teams can both run and pass the football out of it with an equal amount of success. This is important because it keeps defenses guessing on what type of play the offense will run. Because the backs are opposite each other, it takes the defense longer to read the gap the offense will run the ball to.Once the run has been established, it can be a very dangerous formation. Because of the real threat of a team running out of the pro-set, defenses must respect the play fake and play run. This pulls the safety to the line and opens up the middle of the field deep. Also, with both backs in position to "pick up" an outside blitz, the pro-set gives a quarterback an abundance of time to find an open receiver. The set can be run with a single tight end and two receivers or no tight ends and three receivers. A standard pro set places the backs about 5 yards behind the line of scrimmage, spaced evenly behind the guards or tackles. In this look teams may utilize two halfbacks, or one halfback and one fullback. A variation of the pro set places the backs offset toward one side (either strong or weak). This look is almost universally used with one fullback one halfback. The backs line up closer to the line of scrimmage than in a standard pro set, about 3 yards deep. The fullback lines up directly behind the quarterback, in the spot he would normally line up in the I-Formation. The halfback then lines up behind either the left or right tackle. The formation has lost its popularity at the college and professional level recently with the rise of shotgun split back formations. It remains common at the high school Junior Varsity and Varsity level. At the NFL level, in the mid-to-late 2000s, the formation became used almost exclusively by West Coast Offense-based teams in occasional third down passing situations, and goal-line situations. In the early 2010s, the pro set almost completely disappeared from the NFL, however in the late 2010s it has been used once again as an occasional goal line and passing downs formation by West Coast Offense-based teams.

— Wikipedia

CONDONE

CONDONE

to disregard or overlook (something illegal, objectionable, or the like);to give tacit approval to;to pardon or forgive (an offense);to cause the condonation of; justify the pardoning of (an offense).Law. to forgive or act so as to imply forgiveness of (a violation of the marriage vow);To grant forgiveness to or for:excuse,remit.Idiom: forgive and forget.overlook,wink at.to ignore or accept behavior that some people consider wrong:disregard,turn a blind eye to,look the other way,make allowance for,let pass.to regard or treat (something bad or blameworthy) as acceptable, forgivable, or harmless;blink (at), brush (aside or off), discount, gloss (over),gloze (over),overpass, paper over, pardon, pass over, remit, shrug off, whitewash;make allowances for; be lenient with;To forgive (marital infidelity or other marital offense).to approve of behaviour that most people think is wrong:To express or give approval,approve,recommend,consent.

— Editors Contribution

Status offense

Status offense

A status offense is an action that is prohibited only to a certain class of people, and most often applied only to offenses committed by minors. In the United States, the term status offense also refers to an offense such as a traffic violation where motive is not a consideration in determining guilt. In the United Kingdom and Europe, this type of status offense may be termed a regulatory offense.

— Freebase

take

take

To lay hold of; to seize. To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to capture; to make prisoner. To attack; to seize; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship. To take aim, to direct the eye or weapon; to aim. To take arms, to commence war or hostilities. To take advantage of, to avail one’s self of any peculiar event or opening, whereby an army may be overcome. To take ground to the right or left, is to extend a line, or to move troops in either of those directions. To take down, is to commit to paper that which is spoken by another. To take on, an expression in familiar use among soldiers that have enlisted for a limited period, to signify an extension of service by re-enlisting. To take the field, is to encamp, to commence the operations of a campaign. To take up, to seize; to catch; to arrest; as, to take up a deserter. To take up quarters, to occupy locally; to go into cantonments, barracks, etc.; to become stationary for more or less time. To take up the gauntlet, is to accept a challenge.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Extenuating circumstances

Extenuating circumstances

In law, extenuating circumstances in criminal cases are unusual or extreme facts leading up to or attending the perpetration of the offense which, though an offense has been perpetrated without legal justification or excuse, mitigate or reduce its gravity from the point of view of punishment or moral opprobrium. According to English procedure, the jury has no power to determine the punishment to be awarded for an offense. The sentence, with certain exceptions in capital cases, is within the sole discretion of the judge, subject to the statutory prescriptions as to the kind and maximum of punishment. It is common practice for juries to add to their verdict, guilty or not guilty, a rider recommending the accused to mercy on the ground of grave provocation received, or other circumstances which in their view should mitigate the penalty. Quite independently of any recommendation by the jury, the judge is entitled to take into account matters proved during the trial, or laid before him/her after verdict, as a guide to determining the quantum of punishment. Under French law, it is the sole right and the duty of a jury in a criminal case to pronounce whether or not the perpetration of the offense was attended by extenuating circumstances. They are not bound to say anything about the matter, but the whole or the majority may qualify the verdict by finding extenuation, and if they do, the powers of the court to impose the maximum punishment are taken away and the sentence to be pronounced is reduced in accordance with the scale laid down in art. 463 of the Code penal. The most important result of this rule in earlier times was to enable a jury to prevent the infliction of capital punishment for murder.

— Freebase

Offense

Offense

In sports, offense or offence, also known as attack, is the action of attacking or engaging an opposing team with the objective of scoring points or goals. The term may also refer to the tactics involved in offense, or a sub-team whose primary responsibility is offense. Generally, goals are scored by teams' offenses, but in sports such as American Football it is common to see defenses and special teams score as well. The fielding side in Cricket is also generally known as the bowling attack despite the batting side being the side that scores runs. In Britain and elsewhere, the term offence is almost always taken to mean an infraction of the rules, a penalty or foul, and attack is more likely to be used where Americans would use 'offense'.

— Freebase

Accomplice

Accomplice

At law, an accomplice is a person who actively participates in the commission of a crime, even though they take no part in the actual criminal offense. For example, in a bank robbery, the person who points the gun at the teller and asks for the money is guilty of armed robbery. However, anyone else directly involved in the commission of the crime, such as the lookout or the getaway car driver, is an accomplice, even though in the absence of an underlying offense keeping a lookout or driving a car would not be an offense. An accomplice differs from an accessory in that an accomplice is present at the actual crime, and could be prosecuted even if the main criminal is not charged or convicted. An accessory is generally not present at the actual crime, and may be subject to lesser penalties than an accomplice or principal. An accomplice was often referred to as an abettor. This term is not in active use in the United States, having been replaced by accomplice. At law, an accomplice has the same degree of guilt as the person he or she is assisting, is subject to prosecution for the same crime, and faces the same criminal penalties. As such, the three accomplices to the bank robbery above can also be found guilty of armed robbery even though only one stole money.

— Freebase

Driving under the influence

Driving under the influence

Driving under the influence, driving while intoxicated, drunk driving, drink driving, operating under the influence, drinking and driving, or impaired driving is the crime of driving a motor vehicle with blood levels of alcohol in excess of a legal limit. Similar regulations cover driving or operating certain types of machinery while affected by drinking alcohol or taking other drugs, including, but not limited to prescription drugs. This is a criminal offense in most nations. Convictions do not necessarily involve actual driving of the vehicle. In most jurisdictions, a quantitative measurement such as a blood alcohol content in excess of a specific threshold level, such as 0.05% or 0.08%, defines the offense with no need to prove impairment or intoxication. In some jurisdictions, there is an aggravated category of the offense at a higher BAC level, such as 0.12%. In most countries, anyone who is convicted of injuring or killing someone while under the influence of alcohol or drugs can be heavily fined, as in France, in addition to being given a lengthy prison sentence. Many employers or occupations have their own rules and BAC limits; for example, the United States Federal Railroad Administration has a 0.04% limit for train crew. Certain large corporations have their own rules; for example, Union Pacific Railroad has their own BAC limit of 0.02% that, if violated during a random test or a for-cause test — for example, after a traffic accident — can result in termination of employment with no chance of future re-hire. Some jurisdictions have multiple levels of BAC for different categories of drivers; for example, the state of California has a general 0.08% BAC limit, a lower limit of 0.04% for commercial operators, and a limit of 0.01% for drivers who are under 21 or on probation for previous DUI offenses.

— Freebase

Malum prohibitum

Malum prohibitum

Malum prohibitum is a Latin phrase used in Law to refer to conduct that constitutes an unlawful act only by virtue of statute, as opposed to conduct evil in and of itself, or malum in se. Conduct that is so clearly violative of society's standards for allowable conduct that it is illegal under English common law is usually regarded as malum in se. An offense that is malum prohibitum may not appear on the face to directly violate moral standards. The distinction between these two cases is discussed in State of Washington v. Thaddius X. Anderson: Criminal offenses can be broken down into two general categories malum in se and malum prohibitum. The distinction between malum in se and malum prohibitum offenses is best characterized as follows: a malum in se offense is "naturally evil as adjudged by the sense of a civilized community," whereas a malum prohibitum offense is wrong only because a statute makes it so. State v. Horton, 139 N.C. 588, 51 S.E. 945, 946. "Public welfare offenses" are a subset of malum prohibitum offenses as they are typically regulatory in nature and often "'result in no direct or immediate injury to person or property but merely create the danger or probability of it which the law seeks to minimize.'" Bash, 130 Wn.2d at 607; see also State v. Carty, 27 Wn. App. 715, 717, 620 P.2d 137.

— Freebase

Attempt

Attempt

Attempt in criminal law is an offense that occurs when a person comes dangerously close to carrying out a criminal act, and intends to commit the act, but does not in fact commit it. The person may have carried out all the necessary steps but still failed, or the attempt may have been abandoned or prevented at a late stage. The attempt must have gone beyond mere planning or preparation, and is distinct from other Inchoate offenses such as conspiracy to commit a crime or solicitation of a crime. There are many specific crimes of attempt, such as attempted murder, which may vary by jurisdiction. Punishment is often less severe than would be the case if the attempted crime had been carried out. Abandonment of the attempt may constitute a not guilty defence, depending partly on the extent to which the attempt was abandoned freely and voluntarily. Early common law did not punish attempts; the law of attempt was not recognised by common law until the case of b. Rex v. Scofield in 1784. The essence of the crime of attempt in legal terms is that the defendant has failed to commit the actus reus of the full offense, but has the direct and specific intent to commit that full offense.

— Freebase

exception

exception

An objection; cavil; dissent; disapprobation; offense; cause of offense; usually followed by to or against.

— Wiktionary

Offend

Offend

of-fend′, v.t. to displease or make angry: to do harm to: to affront: (B.) to cause to sin.—v.i. to sin: to cause anger: (B.) to be made to sin.—n. Offence′, any cause of anger or displeasure: an injury: a crime: a sin: affront: assault.—adjs. Offence′ful (Shak.) giving offence or displeasure: injurious; Offence′less (Milt.), unoffending: innocent.—ns. Offend′er, one who offends or injures: a trespasser: a criminal:—fem. Offend′ress; Offense, &c., same as Offence, &c.—adj. Offens′ive, causing offence, displeasure, or injury: used in attack: making the first attack.—n. the act of the attacking party: the posture of one who attacks.—adv. Offens′ively.—n. Offens′iveness.—Offensive and defensive, requiring all parties to make war together, or to defend each other if attacked.—Give offence, to cause displeasure; Take offence, to feel displeasure, be offended. [Fr.,—L. ob, against, fendĕre, to strike.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Macehualtin

Macehualtin

The mācēhualtin (IPA: [maːseːˈwaltin], singular mācēhualli [maːseːˈwalli]) were the commoner social class in the Mexica Empire, commonly referred to as the Aztec Empire. The Aztec social class of the mācēhualtin were rural farmers, forming the majority of the commoners in the Mexica Empire. The mācēhualtin worked lands that belonged to the social unit of the calpolli called chinampas, with each family maintaining rights to the land so long as it did not lie fallow for more than two years. Within these lands, the rural mācēhualtin constructed small dams and terraces to increase their agricultural yield. Crops common to Mexican agriculture were grown on these plots, including maize, beans and squash. These projects were probably organized by the local communities and were not state led. From their produce and productivity, the mācēhualtin were required to pay tribute to the Aztec nobility.During the reign of Moctezuma II (1502–1520), they were banned from serving in the royal palaces, as this monarch widened the divide between pipiltin (nobles) and macehualtin. However, before his reign it was noted that there was some mobility, though uncommon, within the social classes. Those who moved up and became pipiltin were called yaotequihua. Those who were brought down ranks in spite of birth status as pipiltin were called pillaquistiltin. Macehualtin could also become or sell their children into slavery. This possibility for social mobility was relatively uncommon due to the locative view of the world held by the Aztecs. This point of view emphasized the idea that everyone and everything had a correct place in the world. It was almost a moral imperative to find one's place and conform to its requirements. This logic extended to social class, with the pipiltin being viewed as having trained to rule the rest of society, specifically made by the Aztec gods for this purpose, and the macehualtin being viewed as having been made to work for the benefit of society. Rituals, teachings, and many other aspects of Aztec society helped to reinforce this worldview. Inequality among the social classes was further reinforced by societal institutions such as a differential set of laws for the commoners and those of the upper class. This differential set of laws was harsher towards the nobility than towards the commoners for a comparable offense.As Aztec society was in part centered on warfare, every Aztec male received some sort of basic military training from an early age. Typically by the time the child reached three years of age, the boy would begin to take simple instruction at the hands of his father on the tasks expected of men, no matter what social class they fell into. The only extremely slim possibility of possible upwards social mobility for mācēhualtin was through military achievement. The taking of captives (māltin [ˈmaːltin], singular mālli) marked an important transition into status as a full warrior, was the way for soldiers to move up the social ladder, and it continued to be a source of honor throughout a man's tenure as a warrior. Failure to take captives or perform well in battle later in life would be a source of dishonor for the warriors. While this would negatively impact warriors who were mācēhualtin, it would be a worse social blow for members of the nobility, although not as materially damaging.The mācēhualtin children attended the telpochcalli or "House of Youths" beginning at fifteen years of age. This was a school for both boys and girls, but the girls and boys learned separately. In the telpochcalli, the young men learned martial arts and other aspects of Aztec warfare. They spent a great deal of time engaged in physical labor around the school and around the community in order to build the young men's strength. Some activities such as hauling firewood eventually took the form of a test of physical prowess as larger and larger loads of firewood were given to the young men; such youths would have to face greater burdens when they took to the battlefield. While the young men prepared to become warriors for the Aztec Empire, the young Aztec women attended the cuicalco or "House of Song", a subdivision of the telpochcalli. Here they learned ritual arts like dance and song.Divisions based on gender prominently affected children among the mācēhualtin. An emphasis on gender divisions began at birth, not just with schooling. Some early rituals differed between newborn boys and newborn girls. For the male children, symbolic actions like giving the umbilical cord to warriors to bury in fields where battles might take place emphasized their role as future warriors. For the female children, symbolic actions like burying the umbilical cord near the hearth emphasized the female role in the home.After the Spanish conquest, the Nahuatl word mācēhualli was adopted in colonial Spanish as macehual, and was used all over New Spain as a synonym for "commoner," "subject," and "native."

— Wikipedia

take

take

The draught of fishes in a single drag of the net. Also, to take, in a military sense, to take or adopt any particular formation, as to take open order, or to take ground to the right or the left.--To take an astronomical observation, so to ascertain the position of a celestial body as to learn from it the place of the ship.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

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An antonym for "curdled"
  • A. solidified
  • B. coagulated
  • C. thin
  • D. grumous