Synonyms containing take out the trash

We've found 104,466 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Take

Take

tāk, v.t. to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with.—v.i. to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:—pa.t. took; pa.p. tā′ken.n. quantity of fish taken or captured at one time.—ns. Take′-in, an imposition, fraud: that by which one is deceived; Take′-off, a burlesque representation of any one; Tā′ker; Tā′king, act of taking or gaining possession: a seizing: agitation, excitement: (Spens. sickness: (Shak.) witchery: malignant influence.—adj. captivating: alluring.—adv. Tā′kingly.—n. Tā′kingness, quality of being taking or attractive.—adj. Tā′ky, attractive.—Take advantage of, to employ to advantage: to make use of circumstances to the prejudice of; Take after, to follow in resemblance; Take air, to be disclosed or made public; Take breath, to stop in order to breathe, to be refreshed; Take care, care of (see Care); Take down, to reduce: to bring down from a higher place, to lower: to swallow: to pull down: to write down; Take for, to mistake; Take French leave (see French); Take from, to derogate or detract from; Take heed, to be careful; Take heed to, to attend to with care; Take in, to enclose, to embrace: to receive: to contract, to furl, as a sail: to comprehend: to accept as true: to cheat: (Shak.) to conquer; Take in hand, to undertake; Take into one's head, to be seized with a sudden notion; Take in vain, to use with unbecoming levity or profaneness; Take in with, to deceive by means of; Take it out of, to extort reparation from: to exhaust the strength or energy of; Take leave (see Leave); Taken in, deceived, cheated; Take notice, to observe: to show that observation is made: (with of) to remark upon; Take off, to remove: to swallow: to mimic or imitate; Take on, to take upon: to claim a character: (coll.) to grieve; Take orders, to receive ordination; Take order with (Bacon), to check; Take out, to remove from within: to deduct: (Shak.) to copy; Take part, to share; Take place, to happen: to prevail; Take root, to strike out roots, to live and grow, as a plant: to be established; Take the field, to begin military operations; Take the wall of, to pass on the side nearest the wall: to get the advantage of; Take to, to apply to: to resort to: to be fond of; Take to heart, to feel sensibly; Take up, to lift, to raise: (Shak.) to borrow money, to buy on credit, to make up a quarrel: to employ, occupy or fill: to arrest: to comprise; Take up arms, to commence to fight; Take upon, to assume; Take up with, to be pleased or contented with, to form a connection with, to fall in love with: to lodge; Take with, to be pleased with. [M. E. taken—Scand.; Ice. taka pa.t. tók, pa.p. tekinn); conn. with L. tangĕre, tetig-i, to touch, and with Eng. tack.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Trash

Trash

trash, v.t. to crop: to strip off superfluous leaves.—n. refuse, matter unfit for food, rubbish good for nothing, a worthless person.—n. Trash′ery, trash, rubbish.—adv. Trash′ily.—ns. Trash′iness, the state or quality of being trashy; Trash′trie (Scot.), trash.—adj. Trash′y, like trash; worthless. [Prob. Scand., Ice. tros, fallen twigs.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Garbology

Garbology

Garbology is the study of modern refuse and trash. The word itself was invented by A. J. Weberman to describe a journalistic technique applied to Bob Dylan wherein the contents of his trash was analyzed. Prior to this the word garbologist was used in Australia to describe garbage collectors. As an academic discipline it was pioneered at the University of Arizona and long directed by William Rathje. The project started in 1973, originating from an idea of two students for a class project. It is a major source of information on the nature and changing patterns in modern refuse, and thereby, human society. Industries wishing to demonstrate that discards originating with their products are important in the trash stream are avid followers of this research, as are municipalities wishing to learn whether some parts of the trash they collect has any salable value. The studies of garbology and archaeology often overlap, because fossilized or otherwise time-modified trash is quite often the only remnant of ancient populations that can be found. For those who did not leave buildings, writing, tombs, trade goods, or pottery, refuse and trash are likely to be the only possible sources of information. In addition, ancient garbage sometimes contains information available in no other way, such as food remains, pollen traces of then local plants, and broken tools.

— Freebase

Out

Out

owt, adv. without, not within: gone forth: abroad: to the full stretch or extent: in a state of discovery, development, &c.: in a state of exhaustion, extinction, &c.: away from the mark: completely: at or to an end: to others, as to hire out: freely: forcibly: at a loss: unsheltered: uncovered.—prep. forth from: outside of: exterior: outlying, remote.—n. one who is out, esp. of office—opp. to In: leave to go out, an outing.—v.i. to go or come out.—interj. away! begone!—n. Out′-and-out′er, a thoroughgoer, a first-rate fellow.—adjs. Out′-of-door, open-air; Out-of-the-way′, uncommon: singular: secluded.—Out and away, by far; Out and out, thoroughly: completely—also as adj. thorough, complete; Out-at-elbows, worn-out, threadbare; Out of character, unbecoming: improper; Out of course, out of order; Out of date, unfashionable: not now in use; Out of favour, disliked; Out of hand, instantly; Out of joint, not in proper connection: disjointed; Out of one's mind, mad; Out of pocket, having spent more than one has received; Out of print, not to be had for sale, said of books, &c.; Out of sorts, or temper, unhappy: cross-tempered; Out of the common, unusual, pre-eminent; Out of the question, that cannot be at all considered; Out of time, too soon or too late: not keeping time in music; Out with, away with: (Scot.) outside of: say, do, &c., at once. [A.S. úte, út; Goth. ut, Ger. aus, Sans. ud.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Trash-talk

Trash-talk

Trash-talk is a form of boast or insult commonly heard in competitive situations. It is often used to intimidate the opposition, but can also be used in a humorous spirit. Trash-talk is often characterized by use of hyperbole, or figurative language, e.g., "Mikael Johansson can't run! You run like honey on ice!" Puns and other wordplay are commonly used. Trash-talk was commonly used by the heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali in the 1960s and 1970s. Since then, it has become common for boxers, wrestlers, and other sports competitors to use trash-talk. Trash talking in amateur sports ranks is generally discouraged and frowned upon.

— Freebase

EVICTED

EVICTED

If someone is evicted from the place where they are living, they are forced to leave it, usually because they have broken a law or contract. to legally force someone to leave the house they are living in, usually because they have not paid their rent; evict someone from something: expel or eject without recourse to legal process; to expel (a person, especially a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent.to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title.To put out by force:bump, dismiss, eject, expel, oust, throw out.Informal: chuck.Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear. expel, remove, turn out, put out, throw out, oust, kick out (informal), eject, dislodge, boot out (informal), force to leave, dispossess, chuck out (informal), show the door (to), turf out (informal), throw on to the streets; to force someone to leave somewhere; drive out, banish, send away.

— Editors Contribution

Going Steady

Going Steady

Going Steady: Film Writings 1968–1969 is the third collection of film reviews by the critic Pauline Kael, comprising the years 1968-1969, when she first began her film-reviewing duties at The New Yorker and which covers, " a crucial period of social and aesthetic change at the end of the sixties." The collection for the most part consists of reviews of individual films, but includes one long essay, entitled "Trash, Art, and the Movies ", perhaps the closest Kael comes to a manifesto defining her personal aesthetics in regards to films. In the essay, Kael dissects, compares, and contrasts the merits of "trash" films that are nevertheless entertaining, as well as "art" films that are uninteresting. In doing so, Kael lambastes "art" films such as Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, concluding her treatment of that particular film by declaring: "If big film directors are to get credit for doing badly what others have been doing brilliantly for years with no money, just because they've put it on a big screen, then businessmen are greater than poets and theft is art." The essay is divided into ten parts, ranging from discussions of The Thomas Crown Affair to Petulia. Kael's overriding theme is to dismantle the intellectual pretences of those who deride films deemed to be "trash" on the basis of dubious aesthetic concerns, notwithstanding the entertainment appeal a particular "trash" film might possess.

— Freebase

take

take

To lay hold of; to seize. To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to capture; to make prisoner. To attack; to seize; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship. To take aim, to direct the eye or weapon; to aim. To take arms, to commence war or hostilities. To take advantage of, to avail one’s self of any peculiar event or opening, whereby an army may be overcome. To take ground to the right or left, is to extend a line, or to move troops in either of those directions. To take down, is to commit to paper that which is spoken by another. To take on, an expression in familiar use among soldiers that have enlisted for a limited period, to signify an extension of service by re-enlisting. To take the field, is to encamp, to commence the operations of a campaign. To take up, to seize; to catch; to arrest; as, to take up a deserter. To take up quarters, to occupy locally; to go into cantonments, barracks, etc.; to become stationary for more or less time. To take up the gauntlet, is to accept a challenge.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

throw away

throw away

To discard (trash, garbage, or the like), to toss out, to put in the trash, to dispose of.

— Wiktionary

litter

litter

To drop or throw trash without properly disposing of it (as discarding in public areas rather than trash receptacles).

— Wiktionary

trashy

trashy

Like trash; containing much trash

— Wiktionary

Andy Prieboy

Andy Prieboy

Andy Prieboy (born April 17, 1955) is an American musician, songwriter, and author. He was lead singer of the band Wall of Voodoo from 1983 to 1988. He went on to record solo albums, musicals and write a novel. He was born in Los Angeles and raised in East Chicago, Indiana. Early in his career, he was in the San Francisco art band Eye Protection, which had one track on the compilation Rising Stars of San Francisco: "Take Her Where The Boys Are". They also recorded a 7-inch single called "Elroy Jetson" with a b-side of "Go Go Girl" on Eleph Records. Later, he replaced Stan Ridgway as the lead singer of Wall of Voodoo when Ridgway left the band in 1983. Seven Days in Sammystown was the first Wall of Voodoo album featuring Prieboy. This was followed up by Happy Planet and finally Ugly Americans in Australia, which was a live album they recorded to fulfill their recording obligations to IRS Records. His first Wall of Voodoo single "Far Side of Crazy" is featured in the film Head Office. His demo for the song "Man Talk", which would finally appear on the album ...Upon My Wicked Son, was featured in the early Brad Pitt film Cutting Class as well as other unreleased Wall of Voodoo demos. These same demos appeared in the film C.H.U.D. II: Bud the C.H.U.D.. He also appears in the film Blood and Concrete along with a few of his original songs (in that movie, Jennifer Beals sings his song, "One Girl in a Million"). After leaving Wall of Voodoo, Prieboy signed with MCA Music Publishing as a songwriter and went to work on new material for his first solo record ...Upon My Wicked Son, which featured the song "Tomorrow Wendy," about a woman dying of AIDS. The song featured a duet with Johnette Napolitano, whose band Concrete Blonde also recorded the song and released it on their album Bloodletting the same year. The music video was directed by Thomas Mignone. MTV initially rejected the song's lyrical content and tone but Prieboy and Mignone decided to feature the decaying cities of Hammond and Gary in Indiana as the "Wendy" character and the video received Buzz Bin status at MTV. The song was also covered by the industrial project System Syn in early 2000s. Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris covered his song "Loving the Highway Man" from the same album. Prieboy then released an EP called Montezuma Was a Man of Faith which featured a country rendition of "Whole Lotta Love" by Led Zeppelin, featuring an uncredited Johnette Napolitano from Concrete Blonde. Prieboy's second solo album was entitled Sins of Our Fathers. In the mid-to-late '90s Prieboy played shows at the Los Angeles club Largo with Rita D'Albert where they worked on an ongoing musical, White Trash Wins Lotto; a Gilbert and Sullivan-esque treatment of the rise and fall of an Axl Rose-like character. It was also performed at the Roxy Theatre on the Sunset Strip for three sold out weekend-long engagements as well as two sold out weekends at New York City's PS 122. Prieboy and crew also performed a medley from White Trash on the Conan O'Brien show. Prieboy is also the co-author with Merrill Markoe of the novel The Psycho Ex Game, based on his song "Psycho Ex". Markoe and Prieboy have lived together since 2004.He released several songs via his website for online purchase. In 2012 Prieboy released the four-song downloadable EP Every Lady Gets A Song, featuring accompaniment by former Dils bassist Tony Kinman and Devo drummer David Kendrick.On December 20, 2016 he released his lost album Virtue Triumphs. The album was left unfinished and abandoned in 1992; it was meant to be the follow-up to his first solo work, ...Upon My Wicked Son. A corporate regime change ultimately swept him out, and the album stayed behind. This was his first body of work that was not beholden to Wall of Voodoo.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "spread out"?
  • A. dissipate
  • B. unfold
  • C. concentrated
  • D. circularise