Synonyms containing take pride in

We've found 8,567 synonyms:

Take

Take

tāk, v.t. to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with.—v.i. to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:—pa.t. took; pa.p. tā′ken.n. quantity of fish taken or captured at one time.—ns. Take′-in, an imposition, fraud: that by which one is deceived; Take′-off, a burlesque representation of any one; Tā′ker; Tā′king, act of taking or gaining possession: a seizing: agitation, excitement: (Spens. sickness: (Shak.) witchery: malignant influence.—adj. captivating: alluring.—adv. Tā′kingly.—n. Tā′kingness, quality of being taking or attractive.—adj. Tā′ky, attractive.—Take advantage of, to employ to advantage: to make use of circumstances to the prejudice of; Take after, to follow in resemblance; Take air, to be disclosed or made public; Take breath, to stop in order to breathe, to be refreshed; Take care, care of (see Care); Take down, to reduce: to bring down from a higher place, to lower: to swallow: to pull down: to write down; Take for, to mistake; Take French leave (see French); Take from, to derogate or detract from; Take heed, to be careful; Take heed to, to attend to with care; Take in, to enclose, to embrace: to receive: to contract, to furl, as a sail: to comprehend: to accept as true: to cheat: (Shak.) to conquer; Take in hand, to undertake; Take into one's head, to be seized with a sudden notion; Take in vain, to use with unbecoming levity or profaneness; Take in with, to deceive by means of; Take it out of, to extort reparation from: to exhaust the strength or energy of; Take leave (see Leave); Taken in, deceived, cheated; Take notice, to observe: to show that observation is made: (with of) to remark upon; Take off, to remove: to swallow: to mimic or imitate; Take on, to take upon: to claim a character: (coll.) to grieve; Take orders, to receive ordination; Take order with (Bacon), to check; Take out, to remove from within: to deduct: (Shak.) to copy; Take part, to share; Take place, to happen: to prevail; Take root, to strike out roots, to live and grow, as a plant: to be established; Take the field, to begin military operations; Take the wall of, to pass on the side nearest the wall: to get the advantage of; Take to, to apply to: to resort to: to be fond of; Take to heart, to feel sensibly; Take up, to lift, to raise: (Shak.) to borrow money, to buy on credit, to make up a quarrel: to employ, occupy or fill: to arrest: to comprise; Take up arms, to commence to fight; Take upon, to assume; Take up with, to be pleased or contented with, to form a connection with, to fall in love with: to lodge; Take with, to be pleased with. [M. E. taken—Scand.; Ice. taka pa.t. tók, pa.p. tekinn); conn. with L. tangĕre, tetig-i, to touch, and with Eng. tack.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gay pride

Gay pride

Gay pride or LGBT pride is the positive stance against discrimination and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people to promote their self-affirmation, dignity, equality rights, increase their visibility as a social group, build community, and celebrate sexual diversity and gender variance. Pride, as opposed to shame and social stigma, is the predominant outlook that bolsters most LGBT rights movements throughout the world. Pride has lent its name to LGBT-themed organizations, institutes, foundations, book titles, periodicals and even a cable TV station and the Pride Library. Ranging from solemn to carnivalesque, pride events are typically held during LGBT Pride Month or some other period that commemorates a turning point in a country’s LGBT history, for example Moscow Pride in May for the anniversary of Russia's 1993 decriminalization of homosexuality. Some pride events include LGBT pride parades and marches, rallies, commemorations, community days, dance parties, and large festivals, such as Sydney Mardi Gras, which spans several weeks. Common symbols of pride are the rainbow or pride flag, the lowercase Greek letter lambda, the pink triangle and the black triangle, these latter two reclaimed from use as badges of shame in Nazi concentration camps.

— Freebase

Pride

Pride

Pride is an inwardly directed emotion that carries two common meanings. With a negative connotation, pride refers to an inflated sense of one's personal status or accomplishments, often used synonymously with hubris. With a positive connotation, pride refers to a satisfied sense of attachment toward one's own or another's choices and actions, or toward a whole group of people, and is a product of praise, independent self-reflection, or a fulfilled feeling of belonging. Philosophers and social psychologists have noted that pride is a complex secondary emotion which requires the development of a sense of self and the mastery of relevant conceptual distinctions through language-based interaction with others. Some social psychologists identify it as linked to a signal of high social status. In contrast pride could also be defined as a disagreement with the truth. One definition of pride in the first sense comes from St. Augustine: "the love of one's own excellence". In this sense, the opposite of pride is either humility or guilt; the latter in particular being a sense of one's own failure in contrast to Augustine's notion of excellence.

— Freebase

Pride

Pride

prīd, n. state or feeling of being proud: too great self-esteem: haughtiness: overbearing treatment of others: a proper sense of what is becoming to one's self: a feeling of pleasure on account of something worthily done: that of which men are proud: that which excites boasting: elevation, loftiness: beauty displayed, ornament, ostentation: high spirit, mettle: (Shak.) lust.—v.t. to have or take pride: to value, as one's self, &c.—adj. Pride′ful.—adv. Pride′fully.—n. Pride′fulness.—adj. Pride′less. [A.S. prýteprút, proud.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mufasa

Mufasa

Mufasa was one of the secondary protagonists in the Lion King franchise. He was Simba's father, Sarabi's husband, Scar's older brother, Nala's father-in-law, Kiara and Kopa's grandfather, Ahadi's oldest son, and the former King of Pride Rock. In The Lion King, Mufasa and his mate Sarabi give birth to baby Simba, who grows up to be a spunky cub who can't wait to be king of Pride Rock. So Mufasa teaches his son about being king and shows him the whole kingdom. Eventually, Mufasa saves Simba and Nala from Shenzi, Banzai and Ed after being alerted by Zazu. Mufasa scolds Simba for almost getting him and Nala killed, but Simba said he was only trying to be brave like him; but Mufasa reveals he's only brave when he has to be. One day, Mufasa's younger brother Scar plots to kill him and Simba, with help from the hyenas. After giving the signal to Shenzi, Banzai and Ed, they cause a wildebeest stampede, in which Simba is almost killed, but is saved in time by Mufasa, who was alerted by Scar. With Simba watching on a safe hill, Mufasa struggles to climb his way back up. He sees Scar at the top and tells him to save him. But Scar grabs Mufasa with his claws (thus making him roar in pain), and with a wicked smile, Scar whispers, "Long live the king!". Horrified, Mufasa realizes Scar's true feelings toward him and he lets go of his brother, sending him flying into the stampede, thus getting trampled and killed. When Simba goes down to help his dad, he soon realizes he's dead and begins to cry. Scar shows up and tricks Simba into believing he caused his father's death and told him to run away and never return. He then sends Shenzi, Banzai and Ed to kill Simba, to which they fail, unbeknownst to Scar. Many years pass, and Simba is now an adult and afraid to go back home and confront Scar. But eventually, the ghost of Mufasa appears in the night sky and gives Simba confindence and tells him to remember who he is. At the end, Simba finally does go back to the Pride Lands and defeats Scar, taking his rightful place as the new king of Pride Rock and avenging his dad. In The Lion King II: Simba's Pride, Mufasa's ghost appears at the end to give Kiara and Kovu his blessing. At the end, Mufasa tells Simba that he's proud of him after Kiara and Kovu get married. In The Lion King 1½, we see Mufasa's story from Timon and Pumbaa's point of view, and they riff on Mufasa's scenes like how Mike, Joel, and the Bots used to do in Mystery Science Theater 3000. He also appeared as a guest in House of Mouse. Mufasa's ghost appears again in Kingdom Hearts II to once again give Simba confidence, and he has a flashback where he remembers what Mufasa told him about the stars when he was a kid. His character was similar to another character James Earl Jones played in Coming to America. Mufasa was voiced by James Earl Jones and by Keith David in House of Mouse.

— Freebase

take

take

To lay hold of; to seize. To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to capture; to make prisoner. To attack; to seize; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship. To take aim, to direct the eye or weapon; to aim. To take arms, to commence war or hostilities. To take advantage of, to avail one’s self of any peculiar event or opening, whereby an army may be overcome. To take ground to the right or left, is to extend a line, or to move troops in either of those directions. To take down, is to commit to paper that which is spoken by another. To take on, an expression in familiar use among soldiers that have enlisted for a limited period, to signify an extension of service by re-enlisting. To take the field, is to encamp, to commence the operations of a campaign. To take up, to seize; to catch; to arrest; as, to take up a deserter. To take up quarters, to occupy locally; to go into cantonments, barracks, etc.; to become stationary for more or less time. To take up the gauntlet, is to accept a challenge.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

LGBT community

LGBT community

The LGBT community (or LGBTQ community or GLBT community), also referred to as the gay community, is a loosely defined grouping of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, LGBT organizations, and subcultures, united by a common culture and social movements. These communities generally celebrate pride, diversity, individuality, and sexuality. LGBT activists and sociologists see LGBT community-building as a counterbalance to heterosexism, homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, sexualism, and conformist pressures that exist in the larger society. The term pride or sometimes gay pride is used to express the LGBT community's identity and collective strength; pride parades provide both a prime example of the use and a demonstration of the general meaning of the term. The LGBT community is diverse in political affiliation. Not all people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender consider themselves part of the LGBT community. Groups that may be considered part of the LGBT community include gay villages, LGBT rights organizations, LGBT employee groups at companies, LGBT student groups in schools and universities, and LGBT-affirming religious groups. LGBT communities may organize themselves into, or support, movements for civil rights promoting LGBT rights in various places around the world.

— Wikipedia

Pique

Pique

pēk, n. an offence taken: a feeling of anger or vexation caused by wounded pride: spite: nicety: punctilio.—v.t. to wound the pride of: to offend: to pride or value (one's self):—pr.p. piq′uing; pa.t. and pa.p. piqued. [Fr. pique, a pike, pique; cf. Pick and Pike.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Proud

Proud

prowd (comp. Proud′er; superl. Proud′est), adj. having excessive self-esteem: arrogant: haughty: having a proper sense of what is becoming: daring: grand: ostentatious: giving reason for pride or boasting.—n. Proud′-flesh, a growth or excrescence of flesh in a wound.—adjs. Proud′-heart′ed (Shak.), having a proud spirit; Proud′ish, somewhat proud.—adv. Proud′ly.—adj. Proud′-mind′ed (Shak.), proud in mind.—n. Proud′ness, the state or quality of being proud: pride.—adjs. Proud′-pied (Shak.), gorgeously variegated; Proud′-stom′ached, of haughty spirit, arrogant. [A.S. prut, proud, prýte, pride.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

proud

proud

Generating a sense of pride; being a cause for pride.

— Wiktionary

Runaways

Runaways

Runaways is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. The series features a group of teenagers who discover that their parents are part of an evil crime group called the Pride. Created by Brian K. Vaughan and Adrian Alphona, the series debuted in July of 2003 as part of Marvel Comics' "Tsunami" imprint. The series had been canceled in September 2004 at issue eighteen, but due to high numbers of trade collection sales, Marvel revived the series in February 2005. Originally, the series featured a group of six kids whose parents routinely met every year for a charity event. One year, the kids spy on their parents and learn they are "the Pride", a criminal group of mob bosses, time-travelers, dark wizards, mad scientists, alien invaders and telepathic mutants. The kids steal weapons and resources from their parents, and learn they themselves inherited their parents' powers; Alex Wilder, a prodigy, leads the team while Nico Minoru learns she is a powerful witch, Karolina Dean discovers she is an alien, Gertrude Yorkes learns of her telepathic link to a dinosaur, Chase Stein steals his father's futuristic gloves, while young Molly Hayes learns she is a mutant with incredible strength. The kids band together and defeat their parents, and atone for the sins of their parents by fighting the new threats trying to fill in the Pride's void. After being betrayed by Alex he is killed by the Gibborim, they are later joined by cyborg Victor Mancha, shape-shifting Skrull Xavin, and plant-manipulator Klara Prast.

— Freebase

My Pride

My Pride

My Pride is an album by Joey Yung that was released on 25 March 2003. The title song, "My Pride," was a cover of Fiona Fung's English song, "Proud of You." Due to the success of "My Pride," Yung would earn over five awards for that song alone.

— Freebase

Shahnaz

Shahnaz

Shahnaz (Persian: شهناز‎) or Shehnaz is a given name and surname, generally to a girl. The name is made from شاه (Shah, "king"), and ناز (Naz, "pride"), so the name means "pride of the king". Shahnaaz is a female Dari name that can be translated in English as "sweet music". Also spelled Shahnaz or Shaanaaz-Shaan in Hindi means: stately, elegant, a style of eloquence, "Naaz": pride

— Wikipedia

EuroPride

EuroPride

EuroPride is a pan-European international event dedicated to LGBTI pride, hosted by a different European city each year. The host city is usually one with an established pride event or a significant LGBTI community. For up to a month, numerous sporting, artistic and human rights events are staged throughout the host city. EuroPride usually culminates during a weekend with a traditional Mardi Gras-style pride parade, live music, human rights conference, special club nights, and an AIDS memorial vigil.

— Wikipedia

Azedarach

Azedarach

a handsome Asiatic tree (Melia azedarach), common in the southern United States; -- called also, Pride of India, Pride of China, and Bead tree

— Webster Dictionary

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. callow
  • B. unpracticed
  • C. new
  • D. experient