Synonyms containing take up the discourse

We've found 88,230 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Take

Take

tāk, v.t. to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with.—v.i. to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:—pa.t. took; pa.p. tā′ken.n. quantity of fish taken or captured at one time.—ns. Take′-in, an imposition, fraud: that by which one is deceived; Take′-off, a burlesque representation of any one; Tā′ker; Tā′king, act of taking or gaining possession: a seizing: agitation, excitement: (Spens. sickness: (Shak.) witchery: malignant influence.—adj. captivating: alluring.—adv. Tā′kingly.—n. Tā′kingness, quality of being taking or attractive.—adj. Tā′ky, attractive.—Take advantage of, to employ to advantage: to make use of circumstances to the prejudice of; Take after, to follow in resemblance; Take air, to be disclosed or made public; Take breath, to stop in order to breathe, to be refreshed; Take care, care of (see Care); Take down, to reduce: to bring down from a higher place, to lower: to swallow: to pull down: to write down; Take for, to mistake; Take French leave (see French); Take from, to derogate or detract from; Take heed, to be careful; Take heed to, to attend to with care; Take in, to enclose, to embrace: to receive: to contract, to furl, as a sail: to comprehend: to accept as true: to cheat: (Shak.) to conquer; Take in hand, to undertake; Take into one's head, to be seized with a sudden notion; Take in vain, to use with unbecoming levity or profaneness; Take in with, to deceive by means of; Take it out of, to extort reparation from: to exhaust the strength or energy of; Take leave (see Leave); Taken in, deceived, cheated; Take notice, to observe: to show that observation is made: (with of) to remark upon; Take off, to remove: to swallow: to mimic or imitate; Take on, to take upon: to claim a character: (coll.) to grieve; Take orders, to receive ordination; Take order with (Bacon), to check; Take out, to remove from within: to deduct: (Shak.) to copy; Take part, to share; Take place, to happen: to prevail; Take root, to strike out roots, to live and grow, as a plant: to be established; Take the field, to begin military operations; Take the wall of, to pass on the side nearest the wall: to get the advantage of; Take to, to apply to: to resort to: to be fond of; Take to heart, to feel sensibly; Take up, to lift, to raise: (Shak.) to borrow money, to buy on credit, to make up a quarrel: to employ, occupy or fill: to arrest: to comprise; Take up arms, to commence to fight; Take upon, to assume; Take up with, to be pleased or contented with, to form a connection with, to fall in love with: to lodge; Take with, to be pleased with. [M. E. taken—Scand.; Ice. taka pa.t. tók, pa.p. tekinn); conn. with L. tangĕre, tetig-i, to touch, and with Eng. tack.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Domain of discourse

Domain of discourse

In the formal sciences, the domain of discourse, also called the universe of discourse, is the set of entities over which certain variables of interest in some formal treatment may range. The domain of discourse is usually identified in the preliminaries, so that there is no need in the further treatment to specify each time the range of the relevant variables. For example, in an interpretation of first-order logic, the domain of discourse is the set of individuals that the quantifiers range over. In one interpretation, the domain of discourse could be the set of real numbers; in another interpretation, it could be the set of natural numbers. If no domain of discourse has been identified, a proposition such as ∀x is ambiguous. If the domain of discourse is the set of real numbers, the proposition is false, with x = √2 as counterexample; if the domain is the set of naturals, the proposition is true, since 2 is not the square of any natural number. The term universe of discourse generally refers to the collection of objects being discussed in a specific discourse. In model-theoretical semantics, a universe of discourse is the set of entities that a model is based on. The term universe of discourse is generally attributed to Augustus De Morgan and was also used by George Boole in his Laws of Thought.

— Freebase

Ruth Wodak

Ruth Wodak

Ruth Wodak (born 12 July 1950 in London) is an Austrian linguist, who is Emeritus Distinguished Professor and Chair in Discourse Studies at Department of Linguistics and English Language at Lancaster University. and Professor in Linguistics at the University of Vienna. Her research is mainly located in discourse studies and in critical discourse analysis. Together with her former colleagues and Ph.D students in Vienna (Rudolf de Cillia, Gertraud Benke, Helmut Gruber, Florian Menz, Martin Reisigl, Usama Suleiman, Christine Anthonissen), she elaborated the Discourse Historical Approach, an interdisciplinary, problem-oriented approach to analysing the change of discursive practices over time and in various genres. She is member of the editorial board of a range of linguistic journals, co-editor of Discourse and Society, Critical Discourse Studies, and of the Journal of Language and Politics. She was the founding editor (together with Paul Chilton) of the book series Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture. She was also section editor of "Language and Politics" for the Second Edition of the Elsevier Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Ruth Wodak chaired the Humanities and Social Sciences Panel for the EURYI award, in the European Science Foundation from 2006 to 2008.

— Wikipedia

Discourse

Discourse

Discourse denotes written and spoken communications such as: ⁕In semantics and discourse analysis: A generalization of the concept of conversation within all modalities and contexts. ⁕The totality of codified language used in a given field of intellectual enquiry and of social practice, such as legal discourse, medical discourse, religious discourse, et cetera. ⁕In the work of Michel Foucault, and that of the social theoreticians he inspired: discourse describes “an entity of sequences, of signs, in that they are enouncements ”. An enouncement is not a unit of semiotic signs, but an abstract construct that allows the signs to assign and communicate specific, repeatable relations to, between, and among objects, subjects, and statements. Hence, a discourse is composed of semiotic sequences between and among objects, subjects, and statements. The term discursive formation conceptually describes the regular communications that produce such discourses. As a philosopher, Foucault applied the discursive formation in the analyses of large bodies of knowledge, such as political economy and natural history.

— Freebase

Discourse analysis

Discourse analysis

Discourse analysis, or discourse studies, is a general term for a number of approaches to analyzing written, vocal, or sign language use or any significant semiotic event. The objects of discourse analysis—discourse, writing, conversation, communicative event—are variously defined in terms of coherent sequences of sentences, propositions, speech acts, or turns-at-talk. Contrary to much of traditional linguistics, discourse analysts not only study language use 'beyond the sentence boundary', but also prefer to analyze 'naturally occurring' language use, and not invented examples. Text linguistics is related. The essential difference between discourse analysis and text linguistics is that it aims at revealing socio-psychological characteristics of a person/persons rather than text structure. Discourse analysis has been taken up in a variety of social science disciplines, including linguistics, education, sociology, anthropology, social work, cognitive psychology, social psychology, international relations, human geography, communication studies, and translation studies, each of which is subject to its own assumptions, dimensions of analysis, and methodologies.

— Freebase

Discourse community

Discourse community

A discourse community is a group of people who share a set of discourses, understood as basic values and assumptions, and ways of communicating about those goals. Linguist John Swales defined discourse communities as "groups that have goals or purposes, and use communication to achieve these goals."Some examples of a discourse community might be those who read and/or contribute to a particular academic journal, or members of an email list for Madonna fans. Each discourse community has its own unwritten rules about what can be said and how it can be said: for instance, the journal will not accept an article with the claim that "Discourse is the coolest concept"; on the other hand, members of the email list may or may not appreciate a Freudian analysis of Madonna's latest single. Most people move within and between different discourse communities every day.

— Wikipedia

Discourse marker

Discourse marker

In linguistics, a discourse marker is a word or phrase that is relatively syntax-independent and does not change the meaning of the sentence, and has a somewhat empty meaning. Examples of discourse markers include the particles "oh", "well", "now", "then", "you know", and "I mean", and the connectives "so", "because", "and", "but", and "or". In Practical English Usage Michael Swan defines a 'discourse marker' as 'a word or expression which shows the connection between what is being said and the wider context'. For him, it is something that a connects a sentence to what comes before or after, or b indicates a speaker's attitude to what he is saying. He gives three examples: on the other hand; frankly; as a matter of fact. Traditionally, some of the words or phrases that were considered discourse markers were treated as "fillers" or "expletives": words or phrases that had no function at all. Now they are assigned functions in different levels of analysis: topic changes, reformulations, discourse planning, stressing, hedging, or backchanneling. Those functions can be classified into three broad groups: relationships among utterances; relationships between the speaker and the message, and relationships between speaker and hearer. An example of the latter is the Yiddish involvement discourse marker nu, also used in Modern Hebrew and other languages, often to convey impatience or to urge the hearer to act.

— Freebase

take

take

To lay hold of; to seize. To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to capture; to make prisoner. To attack; to seize; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship. To take aim, to direct the eye or weapon; to aim. To take arms, to commence war or hostilities. To take advantage of, to avail one’s self of any peculiar event or opening, whereby an army may be overcome. To take ground to the right or left, is to extend a line, or to move troops in either of those directions. To take down, is to commit to paper that which is spoken by another. To take on, an expression in familiar use among soldiers that have enlisted for a limited period, to signify an extension of service by re-enlisting. To take the field, is to encamp, to commence the operations of a campaign. To take up, to seize; to catch; to arrest; as, to take up a deserter. To take up quarters, to occupy locally; to go into cantonments, barracks, etc.; to become stationary for more or less time. To take up the gauntlet, is to accept a challenge.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

discourse marker

discourse marker

a word or phrase that marks a boundary in a discourse, typically as part of a dialogue. Discourse markers often signal topic changes, reformulations, discourse planning, stressing, hedging, or backchanneling.

— Wiktionary

Discourse relation

Discourse relation

A discourse relation (or rhetorical relation) is a description of how two segments of discourse are logically connected to one another. One method of modeling discourse involves a set of concepts that constitute "segmented discourse representation theory" (SDRT).

— Wikipedia

Ideograph

Ideograph

An ideograph or virtue word is a word frequently used in political discourse that uses an abstract concept to develop support for political positions. Such words are usually terms that do not have a clear definition but are used to give the impression of a clear meaning. Such examples include and . Rhetorical critics use chevrons or angle brackets to mark off ideographs. The term ideograph was coined by rhetorical scholar and critic Michael Calvin McGee describing the use of particular words and phrases as political language in a way that captures particular ideological positions. McGee sees the ideograph as a way of understanding of how specific, concrete instances of political discourse relate to the more abstract idea of political ideology. Robertson defines ideographs as “political slogans or labels that encapsulate ideology in political discourse.” Meanwhile, Celeste Condit and John Lucaites, influenced by McGee, explain, “Ideographs represent in condensed form the normative, collective commitments of the members of a public, and they typically appear in public argumentation as the necessary motivations or justifications for action performed in the name of the public.” Ideographs are common in advertising and political discourse.

— Freebase

Fictionalism

Fictionalism

Fictionalism is the view in philosophy according to which statements that appear to be descriptions of the world should not be construed as such, but should instead be understood as cases of "make believer", of pretending to treat something as literally true. Two important strands of fictionalism are modal fictionalism developed by Gideon Rosen, which states that possible worlds, regardless of whether they exist or not, may be a part of a useful discourse, and mathematical fictionalism advocated by Hartry Field, which states that talk of numbers and other mathematical objects is nothing more than a convenience for doing science. Also in meta-ethics, there is an equivalent position called moral fictionalism. Many modern versions of fictionalism are influenced by the work of Kendall Walton in aesthetics. Fictionalism consists in at least the following three theses: ⁕Claims made within the domain of discourse are taken to be truth-apt; that is, true or false. ⁕The domain of discourse is to be interpreted at face value--not reduced to meaning something else. ⁕The aim of discourse in any given domain is not truth, but some other virtue.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym for "tolerable"?
  • A. fair to middling
  • B. constructive
  • C. adequate
  • D. passable