Synonyms containing thimble bioelectronics

We've found 92 synonyms:

Thimble Bioelectronics

Thimble Bioelectronics

Thimble Bioelectronics" rel="nofollow">Thimble Bioelectronics is an early-stage medical device company developing a digital pain management system for treatment of chronic and acute pain. Thimble was founded in 2012 and is based in Mountain View, CA.

— CrunchBase

Popeye

Popeye

Popeye the Sailor Man is a cartoon fictional character created by Elzie Crisler Segar, who has appeared in comic strips and theatrical and television animated cartoons. He first appeared in the daily King Features comic strip Thimble Theatre on January 17, 1929; Popeye became the strip's title in later years. Although Segar's Thimble Theatre strip was in its tenth year when Popeye made his debut, the sailor quickly became the main focus of the strip and Thimble Theatre became one of King Features' most popular properties during the 1930s. Thimble Theatre was continued after Segar's death in 1938 by several writers and artists, most notably Segar's assistant Bud Sagendorf. The strip continues to appear in first-run installments in its Sunday edition, written and drawn by Hy Eisman. The daily strips are reprints of old Sagendorf stories. In 1933, Max and Dave Fleischer's Fleischer Studios adapted the Thimble Theatre characters into a series of Popeye the Sailor theatrical cartoon shorts for Paramount Pictures. These cartoons proved to be among the most popular of the 1930s, and the Fleischers—and later Paramount's own Famous Studios—continued production through 1957. The shorts are now owned by Turner Entertainment, a subsidiary of Time Warner, and distributed by sister company Warner Bros. Entertainment.

— Freebase

Thimble

Thimble

A thimble is a small hard pitted cup worn for protection on the finger that pushes the needle in sewing. Usually, thimbles with a closed top are used by dressmakers but special thimbles with an opening at the end are used by tailors as this allows them to manipulate the cloth more easily. Finger guards differ from tailors’ thimbles in that they often have a top but are open on one side. Some finger guards are little more that a finger shield attached to a ring to maintain the guard in place. The Old English word þȳmel, the ancestor of thimble, is derived from Old English þūma, the ancestor of our word thumb. A single steel needle from the time of the Han Dynasty ancient China was found in a tomb in Jiangling, and it must be assumed that thimbles were in use at this time also although no thimble seems to have been discovered with the needle. The earliest known thimble — in the form of a simple ring — dates back to the Han Dynasty ancient China also and was discovered during the Cultural Revolution of the People's Republic of China in a lesser dignitary's tomb. Oddly, neither the Romans nor the Greeks before them appear to have used metal thimbles. It may be that leather or cloth finger guards proved sufficiently robust for their purposes. There are so-called Roman thimbles in museum collections, but the provenance of these metal thimbles is, in fact, not certain, and many have been removed from display. No well-documented archeological data link metal thimbles to any Roman site. According to the United Kingdom Detector Finds Database, thimbles dating to the 10th century have been found in England, and thimbles were in widespread use there by the 14th century.

— Freebase

Soxhlet extractor

Soxhlet extractor

A Soxhlet extractor is a piece of laboratory apparatus invented in 1879 by Franz von Soxhlet. It was originally designed for the extraction of a lipid from a solid material. However, a Soxhlet extractor is not limited to the extraction of lipids. Typically, a Soxhlet extraction is only required where the desired compound has a limited solubility in a solvent, and the impurity is insoluble in that solvent. If the desired compound has a significant solubility in a solvent then a simple filtration can be used to separate the compound from the insoluble substance. Normally a solid material containing some of the desired compound is placed inside a thimble made from thick filter paper, which is loaded into the main chamber of the Soxhlet extractor. The Soxhlet extractor is placed onto a flask containing the extraction solvent. The Soxhlet is then equipped with a condenser. The solvent is heated to reflux. The solvent vapour travels up a distillation arm, and floods into the chamber housing the thimble of solid. The condenser ensures that any solvent vapour cools, and drips back down into the chamber housing the solid material. The chamber containing the solid material slowly fills with warm solvent. Some of the desired compound will then dissolve in the warm solvent. When the Soxhlet chamber is almost full, the chamber is automatically emptied by a siphon side arm, with the solvent running back down to the distillation flask. The thimble ensures that the rapid motion of the solvent does not transport any solid material to the still pot. This cycle may be allowed to repeat many times, over hours or days.

— Freebase

thimbled

thimbled

Having a thimble (a thimble-shaped socket).

— Wiktionary

Nuvistor

Nuvistor

The nuvistor is a type of vacuum tube announced by RCA in 1959. Most nuvistors are basically thimble-shaped, but somewhat smaller than a thimble, and much smaller than conventional tubes of the day, almost approaching the compactness of early discrete transistor casings. Triodes and a few tetrodes were made. The tube is made entirely of metal and ceramic. Making nuvistors requires special equipment, since there is no intubation to pump gases out of the envelope. Instead, the entire structure is assembled, inserted into its metal envelope, sealed and processed in a large vacuum chamber with simple robotic devices. Nuvistors are among the highest performing small signal receiving tubes. They feature excellent VHF and UHF performance plus low noise figures, and were widely used throughout the 1960s in television sets (beginning with RCA's "New Vista" line of color sets in 1961 with the CTC-11 chassis), radio and high-fidelity equipment primarily in RF sections, and oscilloscopes. They competed with the solid state revolution, and along with GE's Compactron, probably held it at bay for a few years. RCA discontinued their use in television tuners for its product line in late 1971. One famous application was in the Ampex MR-70, a costly studio tape recorder whose entire electronics section was based on nuvistors. Another limited application of this very small tube was in studio-grade microphones from that era, the AKG/Norelco C12a, which employed the 7586, being a good example. It was also later found that, with minor circuit modification, the nuvistor made a sufficient replacement for the obsolete Telefunken VF14 tube, used in the famed Neumann U 47 studio microphone.. Tektronix also used nuvistors in several of its high end oscilloscopes of the 1960s, before replacing them later with JFET transistors.

— Wikipedia

Thimble

Thimble

thim′bl, n. a metal cover for the finger, used in sewing.—ns. Thim′ble-case, a case for holding a thimble; Thim′bleful, as much as a thimble will hold: a small quantity; Thim′ble-rig, a sleight-of-hand trick in which the performer conceals, or pretends to conceal, a pea or small ball under one of three thimble-like cups.—v.i. to cheat by such means.—ns. Thim′ble-rig′ger; Thim′ble-rig′ging. [A.S. thýmel, a thumb-stall—thúma, a thumb. An extension of thumb.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Anemone virginiana

Anemone virginiana

Anemone virginiana is an upright growing herbaceous plant species in the genus Anemone and family Ranunculaceae. Plants grow 30–80 centimetres tall, flowering early summer but often found flowering till late summer, the flowers are white or greenish-white. After flowering the fruits are produced in a dense rounded thimble shaped spikes 15–35 millimetres long and 12 millimetres wide. When the fruits, called achenes, are ripe they have gray-white colored, densely woolly styles, that allow them to blow away in the wind. Native from Eastern North America, where it is found growing in dry or open woods. Common names include tall anemone, thimble-weed and tumble-weed. Note that several other plant species are known as Thimbleweed. Although this plant sometimes is called a tumbleweed, it lacks the characteristic tumbleweed habit. The fruit resembles a tumbleweed in that it is wind-dispersed and tumbles, an unusual mechanism of seed dispersal.

— Freebase

bioelectronic

bioelectronic

Of or pertaining to bioelectronics

— Wiktionary

nanobioelectronics

nanobioelectronics

Bioelectronics on a nanoscale.

— Wiktionary

Cyborg

Cyborg

A cyborg, short for "cybernetic organism", is a being with both organic and cybernetic parts. See for example biomaterials and bioelectronics. The term was coined in 1960 when Manfred Clynes and Nathan S. Kline used it in an article about the advantages of self-regulating human-machine systems in outer space. D. S. Halacy's Cyborg: Evolution of the Superman in 1965 featured an introduction which spoke of a "new frontier" that was "not merely space, but more profoundly the relationship between 'inner space' to 'outer space' – a bridge...between mind and matter." The beginning of Cyborg creation began when HCI began. There is a clear distinction between the human and computerized technology in HCI, which differs from cyborgs in that cyborgs act out human functions. The term cyborg is often applied to an organism that has enhanced abilities due to technology, though this perhaps oversimplifies the necessity of feedback for regulating the subsystem. The more strict definition of Cyborg is almost always considered as increasing or enhancing normal capabilities. While cyborgs are commonly thought of as mammals, they might also conceivably be any kind of organism and the term "Cybernetic organism" has been applied to networks, such as road systems, corporations and governments, which have been classed as such. The term can also apply to micro-organisms which are modified to perform at higher levels than their unmodified counterparts.

— Freebase

skein

skein

A metallic strengthening band or thimble on the wooden arm of an axle.

— Wiktionary

thimbleful

thimbleful

As much as a thimble will hold.

— Wiktionary

Soxhlet extractor

Soxhlet extractor

A piece of laboratory apparatus consisting of a glass reservoir that sits over a lower flask (containing a boiling solvent) and under a condenser; a sample contained in a paper thimble is placed in the reservoir and soluble materials are continually extracted by the warm solvent and transferred to the lower flask via a siphon.

— Wiktionary

thimbled

thimbled

Wearing a thimble (a cap for the finger, used in sewing).

— Wiktionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of the term "pathologic"?
  • A. diseased
  • B. morbid
  • C. ghoulish
  • D. healthy