Synonyms containing thumb a ride

We've found 1,149 synonyms:

Thumb

Thumb

thum, n. the short, thick digit, consisting of two phalanges, on the radial side of the human hand: the corresponding member in other animals.—v.t. to handle awkwardly: to play or soil with the thumb or fingers.—v.i. to finger.—adj. Thumbed, having thumbs: marked by the thumb, worn.—ns. Thumb′kin, Thumb′screw, an old instrument of torture for compressing the thumb by means of a screw.—adj. Thumb′less.—ns. Thumb′-mark, a mark left by the impression of the thumb on the pages of a book, &c.; Thumb′piece, a piece serving as a support for the thumb: a knob or projection by means of which a spring is worked by pressure of the thumb; Thumb′pot, a very small pot used by florists for starting slips or seedlings; Thumb′-ring (Shak.), a ring worn on the thumb: a ring for the thumb fastened to the guard of a dagger or sword; Thumb′-stall, a covering or sheath for the thumb.—By rule of thumb, in a rough-and-ready practical manner, found by experience to be convenient; Under one's thumb, under one's influence. [With intrusive b from A.S. þuma; cog. with Ger. daumen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pollicization

Pollicization

Pollicization is a plastic surgery technique in which a thumb is created from an existing finger. Typically this consists of surgically migrating the index finger to the position of the thumb in patients who are either born without a functional thumb or in patients who have lost their thumb traumatically and are not amenable to other preferred methods of thumb reconstruction such as toe-to-hand transfers. During pollicization the index finger metacarpal bone is cut and the finger is rotated approximately 120 to 160 degrees and replaced at the base of the hand at the usual position of the thumb. The arteries and veins are left attached. If nerves and tendons are available from the previous thumb these are attached to provide sensation and movement to the new thumb. If the thumb is congenitally absent other tendons from the migrated index finger may be shortened and rerouted to provide good movement. The presence of an opposable thumb is considered important for manipulation of most objects in the physical world. Children born without thumbs often adapt to the condition very well with few limitations therefore the decision to proceed with pollicization lies with the child's parents with the recommendation of their surgeon. Persons who have grown to adulthood with functional thumbs and then lost a thumb find it highly beneficial to have a thumb reconstruction, not only from a functional but from a mental and emotional standpoint.

— Freebase

Thumb compass

Thumb compass

A thumb compass is a type of compass commonly used in orienteering, a sport in which map reading and terrain association are paramount. In cases of homogenous terrain with few distinct features, a bearing between 2 known points on the map may be used. Consequently, most thumb compasses have minimal or no degree markings at all, and are normally used only to take bearings directly from a map, and to orient a map to magnetic north. Thumb compasses are also often transparent so that an orienteer can hold a map in the hand with the compass and see the map through the compass. Thumb compasses attach to one's thumb using a small elastic band. The first commercially successful orienteering thumb compass was the Norcompass, introduced by Suunto in 1983. "The Gear Junkie," a syndicated newspaper columnist in the United States, has an in-depth review of thumb compasses. Placing an even greater emphasis on speed over accuracy, the wrist compass lacks even a baseplate, consisting solely of a needle capsule strapped to the carpometacarpal joint at the base of the thumb; the thumb serves the function of a baseplate when taking and sighting bearings.

— Freebase

Ride-along

Ride-along

A ride-along is an arrangement for a civilian to spend a shift in the passenger seat of an emergency vehicle, observing the work day of a police officer, firefighter, or paramedic. Ride-alongs are offered by many police departments around the world. There is a minimum age to participate in a ride-along. Depending on the department, it is often somewhere between the ages of 14 and 18. When participation of those under 18 is permitted, consent from a parent or legal guardian may be required. Those with criminal records or problems on previous ride-alongs may also be barred from participation. The most common form of ride-alongs are Law Enforcement Explorers, Auxiliary or Volunteer Police officers and participants in Citizen's Police Academy programs. People go on ride-alongs for various reasons. These include interest in a future career in law enforcement, personal interest in law enforcement officers without such a career, journalists wishing to write reports, and those interested in community relations. Some emergency departments require dispatchers to go on ride-alongs so they can get a first-hand feel for the area they are responsible for. Regardless of the reason, all citizens who meet the department's eligibility requirements are generally welcome on a ride-along. The television show Cops is made with a variety of police ride-alongs put into a half-hour segment.

— Wikipedia

Thumbs!

Thumbs!

Thumbs! is a collective term for the O Entertainment short films created by Steve Oedekerk using "Thumbation" technology, a process which combines live-action thumbs and superimposition of the voice actors' faces. The first short, Thumb Wars, was created as a television special and spawned the rest of the series. Each filmette is available on DVD, with exclusive extra footage on the Thumb Wars/Thumbtanic Thumb Double Feature. The entire series is available in a box set called "All Thumbs", which does not include the Double Feature or "The Thumbersons" short. An ongoing joke in the series is the appearance of a one-eyed thumb, who appears in each filmette to give his signature line of "eh-hoo." Most of the shorts have aired on Cartoon Network, before the show or film being parodied air, such as Thumb Wars and Bat Thumb. "Franken thumb" aired around Halloween 2008 and was released on DVD on October 24, 2009. "Blair Thumb" aired in Halloween 2009. It is currently unknown when "Thumbtanic" and "The Godthumb" will air.

— Freebase

International Female Ride Day

International Female Ride Day

International Female Ride Day launched in 2007, is a globally synchronized motorcycle ride day for women motorcyclists who own, ride, or have access to a motorcycle or scooter. The worldwide celebrated day occurs once a year, and calls upon women in all countries to “JUST RIDE!” to take part in the movement aimed at advancing motorcycling for women. International Female Ride Day highlights women who ride while encouraging others to explore the activity.

— Editors Contribution

Tagada

Tagada

A tagada is an amusement ride made by various manufacturers. Riders sit in a round bowl with no seatbelts or restraints. There are bars behind the riders which they hold on to. The ride starts to spin, the music starts playing and pneumatic arms bounce the riders up and down. The Tagada is operated by a human operator who will synchronize the bounces with the music beat. Most operators give time for riders to get to their seats again before making the ride bounce (this occurs if turbulence is too strong). Sometimes riders will be told the ride is over and the gates will not open and the operator will restart the ride making everyone fall over and then open the gates. Tagada rides are often associated with injuries to the occupants, including ejections from the ride, such as 20 June 2011 in Newcastle, or during the 2008 British Grand Prix or October 2009, or most recently in 2016 in Ayr, Scotland where three riders got launched from the ride. Most injuries are broken bones of riders who fall into the middle of the ride. Many street fairs ban tagada rides due to their generally poor safety records and cleanliness.

— Wikipedia

Tom Thumb

Tom Thumb

Tom Thumb is a character of Tomas. The History of Tom Thumb was published in 1621, and was the first fairy tale printed in English. Tom is no bigger than his father's thumb, and his adventures include being swallowed by a cow, tangling with giants, and becoming a favourite of King Arthur. The earliest allusions to Tom occur in various 16th century works such as Reginald Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft where Tom is cited as one of the supernatural folk employed by servant maids to frighten children. Aside from his own tales, Tom figures in Henry Fielding's play Tom Thumb, a companion piece to his The Author's Farce. It was later expanded into a single piece titled The Tragedy of Tragedies, or the History of Tom Thumb the Great. In the middle 18th century, books began to be published specifically for children and, by the middle 19th century, Tom was a fixture of the nursery library. Charlotte Yonge cleansed questionable passages and the tale took on moral overtones. Dinah Mulock however refrained from scrubbing the tale of its vulgarities. Tom Thumb's story has been adapted to several films including the 1958 George Pal musical tom thumb starring Russ Tamblyn. Tiny folkloric characters like Tom are known in cultures around the world.

— Freebase

Drawing pin

Drawing pin

A thumb tack or push pin is a short nail or pin used to fasten items to a wall or board for display and intended to be inserted by hand generally without the assistance of tools. A variety of names are used to refer to different designs intended for various purpose. Thumb tack and push pin are both sometimes compounded or hyphenated. Thumb tacks made of brass, tin or iron may be referred to as brass tacks, brass pins, tin tacks or iron tacks, respectively. These terms are particularly used in the idiomatic expression to come down to brass tacks, meaning to consider basic facts of a situation. Drawing pin or drawing-pin refers to thumb tacks used to hold drawings on drawing boards. Map pin or map tack refers to thumb tacks used to mark locations on a map and to hold the map in place. Paper cricket is a genericized trademark originally referring to a particular brand of thumb tack or push pin with a wide head for easy insertion.

— Freebase

Scrollbar

Scrollbar

A scrollbar is an object in a graphical user interface with which continuous text, pictures or anything else can be scrolled including time in video applications, i.e., viewed even if it does not fit into the space in a computer display, window, or viewport. It was also known as a handle in the very first GUIs. Scrollbars are present in a wide range of electronic devices including computers, graphing calculators, mobile phones, and portable media players. They usually appear on one or two sides of the viewing area as long rectangular areas containing a bar that can be dragged along a trough to move the body of the document as well as two arrows on either end for precise adjustments. The "thumb" has different names in different environments: on the Macintosh it is called a "scroller"; on the Java platform it is called "thumb" or "knob"; Microsoft's .NET documentation refers to it as "scroll box" or "scroll thumb"; in other environments it is called "elevator", "quint", "puck", "wiper" or "grip". Additional functions may be found, such as zooming in/out or various application-specific tools. The thumb can also sometimes be adjusted by dragging its ends. In this case it would adjust both the position and the zooming of the document, where the size of the thumb represents the degree of zooming applied. A thumb that completely fills the trough indicates that the entire document is being viewed, at which point the scrollbar may temporarily become hidden.

— Freebase

Bareback riding

Bareback riding

Bareback riding is a form of horseback riding without a saddle. It requires skill, balance, and coordination, as the rider does not have any equipment to compensate for errors of balance or skill. Proponents of bareback riding argue that riding in this fashion is natural, allows considerable communication with the horse, and improves a rider's balance. The drawbacks include a higher risk of injury due to an increased risk of falling off the horse, the potential to develop poor riding form, and the possibility of considerable discomfort to both horse and rider due to the absence of a supporting tree and any padding between the rider's seat bones and the horse's spine. Over time, it is more fatiguing to both horse and rider to ride bareback. However, in certain situations, bareback riding is particularly suitable. Many riders will ride bareback for a short ride in order to save time in a busy day. It is also common for a rider who will take a horse in only one direction and walk back on foot, such as when moving the horse from one pasture to another, to ride the horse in only a bridle in order to not carry much equipment when returning. In other cases, for example, if a horse is to be allowed to swim in a river, lake or ocean, it is practical to leave expensive leather horse tack off to avoid equipment damage. It is also common for riders in extreme cold weather to ride bareback for short pleasure rides in situations where heavy winter clothing makes it hazardous to ride with a saddle due to the difficulty of sitting correctly in a saddle while wearing thick insulated clothing or the potential of a large snow boot hanging in a stirrup.

— Wikipedia

Ride

Ride

rīd, v.i. to be borne, as on horseback or in a carriage: to practise riding: to manage a horse: to float, as a ship at anchor: to move easily: to domineer: to overlap.—v.t. to do or perform by riding, as a race: to be carried through: to gallop through: to rest on so as to be carried: to control, esp. harshly:—pa.t. rōde; pa.p. rid′den.n. act of riding: an excursion on horseback or in a vehicle: the course passed over in riding, a place for riding: a district inspected by an excise-officer: (print.) a fault caused by the overlapping of leads, &c.—adjs. Rī′dable, Rī′deable, capable of being ridden: passable on horseback.—n. Rī′der, one who rides on a horse: one who manages a horse: one who breaks a horse: a commercial traveller: an addition to a document after its completion, on a separate piece of paper: an additional clause: a mounted robber: a knight: a small forked weight which straddles the beam of a balance to measure the weight: a Dutch gold coin.—adjs. Rī′dered, having stakes laid across the bars; Rī′derless, without a rider; Rī′ding, used to ride or travel: suitable for riding on, as a horse.—n. a road for riding on: a district visited by an excise-officer.—n.pl. Rī′ding-bitts, the bitts to which a ship's cable is secured when riding at anchor.—ns. Rī′ding-boot, a high boot worn in riding; Rī′ding-clerk, a mercantile traveller; Rī′ding-commit′tee, a committee of ministers sent by the General Assembly to carry out an ordination or induction, where the local presbytery refused to act, under the Moderate domination in Scotland in the 18th century; Rī′ding-glove, a gauntlet; Rī′ding-hab′it, the long upper habit, garment, or skirt worn by ladies when riding; Rī′ding-hood, a hood formerly worn by women when riding.—n.pl. Rī′ding-in′terests (Scots law), interests depending on other interests.—ns. Rī′ding-light, a light hung out in the rigging at night when a vessel is riding at anchor; Rī′ding-mas′ter, one who teaches riding; Rī′ding-rhyme, the iambic pentameter, heroic verse—from its use in Chaucer's Tales of the Canterbury pilgrims; Rī′ding-robe, a riding-habit; Rī′ding-rod, a light cane for equestrians; Rī′ding-sail, a triangular sail; Rī′ding-school, a place where riding is taught, esp. a military school; Rī′ding-skirt, a skirt fastened round a woman's waist in riding; Ri′ding-spear, a javelin; Rī′ding-suit, a suit adapted for riding; Rī′ding-whip, a switch with short lash, used by riders; Bush′-rī′der, in Australia, a cross-country rider.—Ride a hobby, to pursue to excess a favourite theory; Ride and tie, to ride and go on foot alternately; Ride down

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Thumb

Thumb

The thumb is the first digit (finger) of the hand. When a person is standing in the medical anatomical position (where the palm is facing to the front), the thumb is the outermost digit. The Medical Latin English noun for thumb is pollex (compare hallux for big toe), and the corresponding adjective for thumb is pollical.

— Wikipedia

Waltzer

Waltzer

A waltzer is a fairground ride that consists of a number of cars which are free to spin individually while rotating around a central point like a carousel. The floor of the ride is not flat and the cars rise and fall gently as the ride spins, the offset weight of the riders causing each car to rotate unpredictably. Sometimes an operator will ride the platform and spin the cars by hand providing a more intense ride. Because of the combination of the ride spinning and the spinning cars, large varying g-forces are perceived as the spin of the car lines up with the rotation of the carousel and at other times opposes it. Most amusement parks and carnivals require the rider to be at least 42 inches tall unless accompanied by an adult. Reasons for this include that a small child might otherwise be thrown out onto the waltzer platform, causing serious injury or death, and may not be able to hold on sufficiently tightly to avoid this. The first waltzer, completed in 1933, was built for English showman Charles Thurston.

— Freebase

Fingerpick

Fingerpick

A fingerpick is a type of plectrum used most commonly for playing bluegrass style banjo music. Most fingerpicks are composed of metal or plastic. Unlike flat guitar picks, which are held between the thumb and finger and used one at a time, fingerpicks clip onto or wrap around the end of the fingers and thumb; thus one hand can pick several strings at once. Generally three are used: one for the thumb, and one each for the middle and index fingers. Fingerpicks worn on the thumb are generally called "thumbpicks". Most players use a plastic thumbpick while using metal fingerpicks. Fingerpicks come in a variety of thicknesses to accommodate different musicians' styles of playing. Thin picks produce a quieter, more delicate sound, while thick picks produce a heavier sound. Fingerpicks are also used by Hawaiian guitar players, Dobro players and bottleneck guitar players. Fingerpicks are sometimes considered easier to use than standard guitar picks, since fingerpicks provide more control than traditional guitar picks. By using fingerpicks, guitarists can play a bass line at the same time as they play a lead, and still get the sound of a standard guitar pick. Some players combine a thumb pick and fingernails.

— Freebase

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An antonym for "ignominious"
  • A. smuggled
  • B. honorable
  • C. inglorious
  • D. opprobrious