Synonyms containing tight binding

We've found 2,384 synonyms:

Tight end

Tight end

The tight end is a position in American football on the offense. The tight end is often seen as a hybrid position with the characteristics and roles of both an offensive lineman and a wide receiver. Like offensive linemen, they are usually lined up on the offensive line and are large enough to be effective blockers. On the other hand, they are eligible receivers adept enough to warrant a defense's attention when running pass patterns. Because of the hybrid nature of the position, the tight end's role in any given offense depends on the tactical preferences and philosophy of the head coach. In some systems, the tight end will merely act as a sixth offensive lineman rarely going out for passes. Other systems utilize the tight end primarily as a receiver, frequently taking advantage of the tight end's size to create mismatches in the defensive secondary. Many coaches will often have one tight end who specializes in blocking in running situations while utilizing a better pass catching tight end in obvious passing situations. Offensive formations may have between zero and two tight ends at one time. If a wide receiver is present in a formation, but outside the tight end, the wide receiver must be positioned behind the line of scrimmage. If two tight ends are on the same side of the line of scrimmage, one must be behind the line of scrimmage.

— Freebase

Tight oil

Tight oil

For another use of the term "shale oil", meaning synthetic crude oil derived from oil shale, see shale oil.Tight oil (also known as shale oil, shale-hosted oil or light tight oil, abbreviated LTO) is light crude oil contained in petroleum-bearing formations of low permeability, often shale or tight sandstone. Economic production from tight oil formations requires the same hydraulic fracturing and often uses the same horizontal well technology used in the production of shale gas. While sometimes called "shale oil", tight oil should not be confused with oil shale, which is shale rich in kerogen, or shale oil, which is oil produced from oil shales. Therefore, the International Energy Agency recommends using the term "light tight oil" for oil produced from shales or other very low permeability formations, while the World Energy Resources 2013 report by the World Energy Council uses the terms "tight oil" and "shale-hosted oil". In May 2013 the International Energy Agency in its Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) said that the North American oil production surge led by unconventional oils - US light tight oil (LTO) and Canadian oil sands - had produced a global supply shock that would reshape the way oil is transported, stored, refined and marketed.

— Wikipedia

Tight

Tight

close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; -- often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight

— Webster Dictionary

Tight

Tight

tīt, adj. close: compact: rigid: hampered from want of money: snug, trim: not leaky: fitting closely, also too closely: scarce, not easily obtainable: (coll.) unwilling to part with money: tipsy: not loose or free in treatment.—v.t. Tight′en, to make tight or tighter: to straiten.—v.i. to grow tight or tighter.—n. Tight′ener, one who, or that which, tightens: (anat.) a tensor: (slang) a heavy meal.—adv. Tight′ly.—ns. Tight′ness; Tight′rope, a tightly-stretched rope on which rope-dancers perform.—n.pl. Tights, a garment often of silk, closely fitting the body, or at least the legs, worn by acrobats, dancers, &c. [Scand., Ice. þéitr; cf. Dan. tæt, Dut. digt, Ger. dicht.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tight binding

Tight binding

In solid-state physics, the tight-binding model is an approach to the calculation of electronic band structure using an approximate set of wave functions based upon superposition of wave functions for isolated atoms located at each atomic site. The method is closely related to the LCAO method used in chemistry. Tight-binding models are applied to a wide variety of solids. The model gives good qualitative results in many cases and can be combined with other models that give better results where the tight-binding model fails. Though the tight-binding model is a one-electron model, the model also provides a basis for more advanced calculations like the calculation of surface states and application to various kinds of many-body problem and quasiparticle calculations.

— Freebase

Heads of terms

Heads of terms

A set of heads of agreement, heads of terms, or letter of intent is a non-binding document outlining the main issues relevant to a tentative sale, partnership, or other agreement. A heads of agreement document will only be enforceable when it is adopted into a parent contract and is subsequently agreed upon, unless otherwise stated. Until that point, a heads of agreement will not be legally binding (See Fletcher Challenge Energy Ltd v Electricity Corp of New Zealand Ltd [2002] 2 NZLR 433). However, such documents can be legally binding if the agreement document contains terms or language which explicitly indicates a binding intention. Equally, a letter which contains no expression of whether its terms were intended to be binding can be found to be binding due to language used. (See RTS Flexible Systems Ltd v Molkerei Alois Müller GmbH & Co KG [2008]) This is also dependent on the circumstances of the transaction and includes the conduct of the parties themselves.

— Wikipedia

Foot binding

Foot binding

Foot binding is the custom of applying painfully tight binding to the feet of young girls to prevent further growth. The practice possibly originated among upper-class court dancers during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period in Imperial China, but spread in the Song Dynasty and eventually became common among all but the lowest of classes. Foot binding became popular as a means of displaying status and was correspondingly adopted as a symbol of beauty in Chinese culture. The Manchu Emperor Kangxi tried to ban footbinding in 1664 but failed. In the 1800s, Chinese reformers challenged the practice but it was not until the early 20th century that foot binding began to die out, partly from changing social conditions and partly as a result of anti-foot binding campaigns. Foot-binding resulted in lifelong disabilities for most of its subjects, and some elderly Chinese women still survive today with disabilities related to their bound feet.

— Freebase

Stannin

Stannin

Stannins are small proteins that consist of a single transmembrane helix, an unstructured linker domain, and a cytoplasmic domain. The transmembrane region contains a conserved cysteine residue (Cys32) that, together with Cys34 found in the stannin unstructured linker domain, constitutes the putative trimethyltin-binding site, close to the lipid/solvent interface.The unstructured protein region connects two adjacent helical domains. It contains a conserved CXC metal-binding motif and a putative 14-3-3-zeta binding domain. Upon coordinating dimethytin, considerable structural or dynamic changes in the flexible loop region of SNN may take place, recruiting other binding partners such as 14-3-3-zeta, and thereby initiating the apoptotic cascade.The cytoplasmic domain forms a distorted helix that is partially absorbed into the plane of the lipid bilayer. It interacts with the surface of the lipid bilayer, and contributes to the initiation of the apoptotic cascade on binding of the unstructured linker domain to dimethyltin.

— Wikipedia

Substrate analog

Substrate analog

Substrate analogs (substrate state analogues), are chemical compounds with a chemical structure that resemble the substrate molecule in an enzyme-catalyzed chemical reaction. Substrate analogs can act as competitive inhibitors of an enzymatic reaction. An example is phosphoramidate to the Tetrahymena group I ribozymeAs a competitive inhibitor, substrate analogs occupy the same binding site as its analog, and decrease the intended substrate’s efficiency. The Vmax remains the same while the intended substrate’s affinity is decreased. This means that less of the intended substrate will bind to the enzyme, resulting in less product being formed. In addition, the substrate analog may also be missing chemical components that allow the enzyme to go through with its reaction. This also causes the amount of product created to decrease. Substrate analogs bind to the binding site reversibly. This means that the binding of the substrate analog to the enzyme’s binding site is non-permanent. The effect of the substrate analog can be nullified by increasing the concentration of the originally intended substrate.Other examples of substrate analogs include: 5’-adenylyl-imidodiphosphate: substrate analog of ATP 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide: substrate analog of NADH Some substrate analogs can still allow the enzyme to synthesize a product despite the enzyme’s inability to metabolize the substrate analog.1 These substrate analogs are known as gratuitous inducers.Example of a substrate analog that is also a gratuitous inducer: IPTG (isopropyl β-thiogalactoside: substrate analog and gratuitous inducer of β-galactosidase activity There are even substrate analogs that bind to the binding site of an enzyme irreversibly. If this is the case, the substrate analog is called an inhibitory substrate analog, a suicide substrate, or even a Trojan horse substrate.Example of a substrate analog that is also a suicide substrate/Trojan horse substrate: Penicillin: substrate analog and suicide substrate/Trojan horse substrate of peptidoglycan

— Wikipedia

Arbitration

Arbitration

Arbitration, a form of alternative dispute resolution, is a technique for the resolution of disputes outside the courts, where the parties to a dispute refer it to one or more persons, by whose decision they agree to be bound. It is a resolution technique in which a third party reviews the evidence in the case and imposes a decision that is legally binding for both sides and enforceable. Other forms of ADR include meditation and non-binding resolution by experts. Arbitration is often used for the resolution of commercial disputes, particularly in the context of international commercial transactions. The use of arbitration is also frequently employed in consumer and employment matters, where arbitration may be mandated by the terms of employment or commercial contracts. Arbitration can be either voluntary or mandatory and can be either binding or non-binding. Non-binding arbitration is similar to mediation in that a decision can not be imposed on the parties. However, the principal distinction is that whereas a mediator will try to help the parties find a middle ground on which to compromise, the arbitrator remains totally removed from the settlement process and will only give a determination of liability and, if appropriate, an indication of the quantum of damages payable. By one definition arbitration is binding and so non-binding arbitration is technically not arbitration.

— Freebase

cooperativity

cooperativity

An interaction between the substrate binding sites of an allosteric enzyme in which binding at one site increases or decreases binding at another

— Wiktionary

Hubbard model

Hubbard model

The Hubbard model is an approximate model used, especially in solid-state physics, to describe the transition between conducting and insulating systems. The Hubbard model, named after John Hubbard, is the simplest model of interacting particles in a lattice, with only two terms in the Hamiltonian (see example below): a kinetic term allowing for tunneling ("hopping") of particles between sites of the lattice and a potential term consisting of an on-site interaction. The particles can either be fermions, as in Hubbard's original work, or bosons, in which case the model is referred to as the "Bose–Hubbard model". The Hubbard model is a good approximation for particles in a periodic potential at sufficiently low temperatures, where all the particles may be assumed to be in the lowest Bloch band, and long-range interactions between the particles can be ignored. If interactions between particles at different sites of the lattice are included, the model is often referred to as the "extended Hubbard model". The model was originally proposed in 1963 to describe electrons in solids, and has since been a focus of particular interest as a model for high-temperature superconductivity. For electrons in a solid, the Hubbard model can be considered as an improvement on the tight-binding model, which includes only the hopping term. For strong interactions, it can give qualitatively different behavior from the tight-binding model, and correctly predicts the existence of so-called Mott insulators, which are prevented from becoming conducting by the strong repulsion between the particles.

— Wikipedia

Air

Air

ār, n. the fluid we breathe: the atmosphere: any special condition of atmosphere, as in 'the night-air,' 'to take the air:' a light breeze: publicity: the bearing of a person: outward appearance, manner, look: an assumed or affected manner: (mus.) a rhythmical melody: a song, also specially a sprightly song: the soprano part in a harmonised composition, being that which gives it its character: (pl.) affectation.—v.t. to expose to the air: to dry: to expose to warm air: (obs.) to take an airing.—ns. Air′-bath, an arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature; Air′-bed, a bed for the sick, inflated with air; Air′-blad′der, in some fishes, an organ containing air, by which they maintain their equilibrium in the water; Air′-brake, a railway brake worked by compressed air.—adj. Air′-built, built in air: having no solid foundation.—ns. Air′-cell, a cavity containing air; Air′-cush′ion, an air-tight cushion, which can be inflated; Air′-drain, an ample space at the foot of foundation walls, for the sake of dryness.—adj. Air′drawn, drawn in air: visionary: (Shak.) imaginary.—ns. Air′-en′gine, an engine put in motion by air expanded by heat; Air′-gas, illuminating gas made by charging atmospheric air with vapour of petroleum or other hydrocarbon; Air′-gun, a gun which discharges bullets by means of compressed air.—adv. Air′ily, gaily.—ns. Air′iness, state of being airy; openness: liveliness; Air′ing, exposure to the air or fire: a short excursion in the open air; Air′-jack′et, a jacket with air-tight cavities, which being inflated renders a person buoyant in water.—adj. Air′less, void of air: not having free communication with the open air.—ns. Air′-lock, a small chamber for the entrance and exit of men and materials, at the top of the caisson or hollow cylinder used for founding the piers of bridges under water; Air′-pump, an instrument for pumping the air out of a vessel; Air′-sac, an air-cell or air-space, esp. in the bones of birds; Air′-shaft, a passage for air into a mine; Air′-ship, a navigable balloon; Air′-space, the cubic content of a room, hospital-ward, or the like, with reference to the respirable air contained in it.—adj. Air′-tight, so tight as not to admit air.—n. Air′-ves′sel, a vessel or tube containing air.—adv. Air′wards, up in the air.—adj. Air′y, consisting of or relating to air: open to the air: like air: unsubstantial: light of heart: sprightly.—To take air, to get wind, to become publicly known. [Fr.—L. aër—Gr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cooperativity

Cooperativity

Cooperativity is a phenomenon displayed by enzymes or receptors that have multiple binding sites where the affinity of the binding sites for a ligand is increased, positive cooperativity, or decreased, negative cooperativity, upon the binding of a ligand to a binding site. For example the affinity of hemoglobin's four binding sites for oxygen is increased above that of the unbound hemoglobin when the first oxygen molecule binds. This is referred to as cooperative binding. We also see cooperativity in large chain molecules made of many identical subunits, when such molecules undergo phase transitions such as melting, unfolding or unwinding. This is referred to as subunit cooperativity.

— Freebase

Dounce homogenizer

Dounce homogenizer

Invented by and named for Alexander Dounce , a Dounce homogenizer or "Douncer", is a cylindrical glass tube, closed at one end, with two glass pestles of carefully specified outer diameters, intended for the gentle homogenization of eukaryotic cells (e.g. mammalian cells). Dounce homogenizers are still commonly used today to isolate cellular organelles. The two Dounce homogenizer pestles (known as the "loose" or "A" and "tight" or "B" pestles), have a carefully specified outer diameter, relative to the inner diameter of the cylinder. The "A" (loose) pestle has a clearance from the cylinder wall of (~0.0025 - 0.0055 in.) while the "B" (tight) pestle has a clearance of (~0.0005 - 0.0025 in.). This allows for tissue and cells to be lysed by shear stress with minimal (if any) degree of heating, thereby leaving extracted organelles or heat-sensitive enzyme complexes largely intact. Typically, a soft tissue (e.g. mammalian liver) is cut or broken into smaller pieces and placed into the glass cylinder, alongside a suitable volume of an appropriate lysis buffer. Homogenization is performed by a defined number of "passes" of the pestles, first with the loose pestle, then with the tight pestle, up and down the cylinder. Five to ten passes are typical. Dounce homogenizers are typically produced from borosilicate glass, but are still fragile, and should be used with care. Especially hard or tough tissues should be pre-homogenized before use in a dounce homogenizer. Eukaryotic cells with tough cell walls, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cannot be directly lysed with a dounce homogenizer, unless the cell wall is first broken down (e.g. with lyticase, or zymolyase in the case of S. cerevisiae).

— Wikipedia

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
An antonym for "prosperous"
  • A. flourishing
  • B. achromatic
  • C. comfortable
  • D. palmy