Synonyms containing tight fit

We've found 2,584 synonyms:

Fit

Fit

fit, adj. adapted to any particular end or standard, prepared for: qualified: convenient: proper: properly trained and ready, as for a race.—v.t. to make fit or suitable: to suit one thing to another: to be adapted to: to qualify.—v.i. to be suitable or becoming:—pr.p. fit′ting; pa.p. fit′ted.advs. Fit′liest (Milt.), most fitly; Fit′ly.—ns. Fit′ment (Shak.), something fitted to an end; Fit′ness; Fit′ter, he who, or that which, makes fit.—adj. Fit′ting, fit: appropriate.—n. anything used in fitting up, esp. in pl.adv. Fit′tingly.—ns. Fit′ting-out, a supply of things, fit and necessary; Fit′ting-shop, a shop in which pieces of machinery are fitted together.—Fit out, to furnish, supply with stores, as a ship; Fit up, to provide with things suitable.—Not fit to hold a candle to (see Candle). [First recorded about 1440; app. cog. with Fit, n.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tight end

Tight end

The tight end is a position in American football on the offense. The tight end is often seen as a hybrid position with the characteristics and roles of both an offensive lineman and a wide receiver. Like offensive linemen, they are usually lined up on the offensive line and are large enough to be effective blockers. On the other hand, they are eligible receivers adept enough to warrant a defense's attention when running pass patterns. Because of the hybrid nature of the position, the tight end's role in any given offense depends on the tactical preferences and philosophy of the head coach. In some systems, the tight end will merely act as a sixth offensive lineman rarely going out for passes. Other systems utilize the tight end primarily as a receiver, frequently taking advantage of the tight end's size to create mismatches in the defensive secondary. Many coaches will often have one tight end who specializes in blocking in running situations while utilizing a better pass catching tight end in obvious passing situations. Offensive formations may have between zero and two tight ends at one time. If a wide receiver is present in a formation, but outside the tight end, the wide receiver must be positioned behind the line of scrimmage. If two tight ends are on the same side of the line of scrimmage, one must be behind the line of scrimmage.

— Freebase

Tight oil

Tight oil

For another use of the term "shale oil", meaning synthetic crude oil derived from oil shale, see shale oil.Tight oil (also known as shale oil, shale-hosted oil or light tight oil, abbreviated LTO) is light crude oil contained in petroleum-bearing formations of low permeability, often shale or tight sandstone. Economic production from tight oil formations requires the same hydraulic fracturing and often uses the same horizontal well technology used in the production of shale gas. While sometimes called "shale oil", tight oil should not be confused with oil shale, which is shale rich in kerogen, or shale oil, which is oil produced from oil shales. Therefore, the International Energy Agency recommends using the term "light tight oil" for oil produced from shales or other very low permeability formations, while the World Energy Resources 2013 report by the World Energy Council uses the terms "tight oil" and "shale-hosted oil". In May 2013 the International Energy Agency in its Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) said that the North American oil production surge led by unconventional oils - US light tight oil (LTO) and Canadian oil sands - had produced a global supply shock that would reshape the way oil is transported, stored, refined and marketed.

— Wikipedia

Tight

Tight

close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; -- often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight

— Webster Dictionary

Tight

Tight

tīt, adj. close: compact: rigid: hampered from want of money: snug, trim: not leaky: fitting closely, also too closely: scarce, not easily obtainable: (coll.) unwilling to part with money: tipsy: not loose or free in treatment.—v.t. Tight′en, to make tight or tighter: to straiten.—v.i. to grow tight or tighter.—n. Tight′ener, one who, or that which, tightens: (anat.) a tensor: (slang) a heavy meal.—adv. Tight′ly.—ns. Tight′ness; Tight′rope, a tightly-stretched rope on which rope-dancers perform.—n.pl. Tights, a garment often of silk, closely fitting the body, or at least the legs, worn by acrobats, dancers, &c. [Scand., Ice. þéitr; cf. Dan. tæt, Dut. digt, Ger. dicht.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Coefficient of determination

Coefficient of determination

In statistics, the coefficient of determination, denoted R2 or r2 and pronounced "R squared", is the proportion of the variance in the dependent variable that is predictable from the independent variable(s). It is a statistic used in the context of statistical models whose main purpose is either the prediction of future outcomes or the testing of hypotheses, on the basis of other related information. It provides a measure of how well observed outcomes are replicated by the model, based on the proportion of total variation of outcomes explained by the model.There are several definitions of R2 that are only sometimes equivalent. One class of such cases includes that of simple linear regression where r2 is used instead of R2. When an intercept is included, then r2 is simply the square of the sample correlation coefficient (i.e., r) between the observed outcomes and the observed predictor values. If additional regressors are included, R2 is the square of the coefficient of multiple correlation. In both such cases, the coefficient of determination normally ranges from 0 to 1. There are cases where the computational definition of R2 can yield negative values, depending on the definition used. This can arise when the predictions that are being compared to the corresponding outcomes have not been derived from a model-fitting procedure using those data. Even if a model-fitting procedure has been used, R2 may still be negative, for example when linear regression is conducted without including an intercept, or when a non-linear function is used to fit the data. In cases where negative values arise, the mean of the data provides a better fit to the outcomes than do the fitted function values, according to this particular criterion. Since the most general definition of the coefficient of determination is also known as the Nash–Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient, this last notation is preferred in many fields, because denoting a goodness-of-fit indicator that can vary from −∞ to 1 (i.e., it can yield negative values) with a squared letter is confusing. When evaluating the goodness-of-fit of simulated (Ypred) vs. measured (Yobs) values, it is not appropriate to base this on the R2 of the linear regression (i.e., Yobs= m·Ypred + b). The R2 quantifies the degree of any linear correlation between Yobs and Ypred, while for the goodness-of-fit evaluation only one specific linear correlation should be taken into consideration: Yobs = 1·Ypred + 0 (i.e., the 1:1 line).

— Wikipedia

Confirmatory factor analysis

Confirmatory factor analysis

In statistics, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) is a special form of factor analysis, most commonly used in social research. It is used to test whether measures of a construct are consistent with a researcher's understanding of the nature of that construct (or factor). As such, the objective of confirmatory factor analysis is to test whether the data fit a hypothesized measurement model. This hypothesized model is based on theory and/or previous analytic research. CFA was first developed by Jöreskog and has built upon and replaced older methods of analyzing construct validity such as the MTMM Matrix as described in Campbell & Fiske (1959).In confirmatory factor analysis, the researcher first develops a hypothesis about what factors they believe are underlying the measures used (e.g., "Depression" being the factor underlying the Beck Depression Inventory and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) and may impose constraints on the model based on these a priori hypotheses. By imposing these constraints, the researcher is forcing the model to be consistent with their theory. For example, if it is posited that there are two factors accounting for the covariance in the measures, and that these factors are unrelated to one another, the researcher can create a model where the correlation between factor A and factor B is constrained to zero. Model fit measures could then be obtained to assess how well the proposed model captured the covariance between all the items or measures in the model. If the constraints the researcher has imposed on the model are inconsistent with the sample data, then the results of statistical tests of model fit will indicate a poor fit, and the model will be rejected. If the fit is poor, it may be due to some items measuring multiple factors. It might also be that some items within a factor are more related to each other than others. For some applications, the requirement of "zero loadings" (for indicators not supposed to load on a certain factor) has been regarded as too strict. A newly developed analysis method, "exploratory structural equation modeling", specifies hypotheses about the relation between observed indicators and their supposed primary latent factors while allowing for estimation of loadings with other latent factors as well.

— Wikipedia

Fit

Fit

fit, n. a sudden attack by convulsions, as apoplexy, epilepsy, &c.: convulsion or paroxysm: a temporary attack of anything, as laughter, &c.: a sudden effort or motion: a passing humour.—v.t. (Shak.) to wrench, as by a fit.—adj. Fit′ful, marked by sudden impulses: spasmodic.—adv. Fit′fully.—n. Fit′fulness.—Fit of the face, a grimace; Fits and starts, spasmodic and irregular bursts of activity; By fits, irregularly. [A.S. fitt, a struggle—prob. orig. 'juncture,' 'meeting;' cf. Ice. fitja, to knit, Dut. vitten, to accommodate.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Air

Air

ār, n. the fluid we breathe: the atmosphere: any special condition of atmosphere, as in 'the night-air,' 'to take the air:' a light breeze: publicity: the bearing of a person: outward appearance, manner, look: an assumed or affected manner: (mus.) a rhythmical melody: a song, also specially a sprightly song: the soprano part in a harmonised composition, being that which gives it its character: (pl.) affectation.—v.t. to expose to the air: to dry: to expose to warm air: (obs.) to take an airing.—ns. Air′-bath, an arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature; Air′-bed, a bed for the sick, inflated with air; Air′-blad′der, in some fishes, an organ containing air, by which they maintain their equilibrium in the water; Air′-brake, a railway brake worked by compressed air.—adj. Air′-built, built in air: having no solid foundation.—ns. Air′-cell, a cavity containing air; Air′-cush′ion, an air-tight cushion, which can be inflated; Air′-drain, an ample space at the foot of foundation walls, for the sake of dryness.—adj. Air′drawn, drawn in air: visionary: (Shak.) imaginary.—ns. Air′-en′gine, an engine put in motion by air expanded by heat; Air′-gas, illuminating gas made by charging atmospheric air with vapour of petroleum or other hydrocarbon; Air′-gun, a gun which discharges bullets by means of compressed air.—adv. Air′ily, gaily.—ns. Air′iness, state of being airy; openness: liveliness; Air′ing, exposure to the air or fire: a short excursion in the open air; Air′-jack′et, a jacket with air-tight cavities, which being inflated renders a person buoyant in water.—adj. Air′less, void of air: not having free communication with the open air.—ns. Air′-lock, a small chamber for the entrance and exit of men and materials, at the top of the caisson or hollow cylinder used for founding the piers of bridges under water; Air′-pump, an instrument for pumping the air out of a vessel; Air′-sac, an air-cell or air-space, esp. in the bones of birds; Air′-shaft, a passage for air into a mine; Air′-ship, a navigable balloon; Air′-space, the cubic content of a room, hospital-ward, or the like, with reference to the respirable air contained in it.—adj. Air′-tight, so tight as not to admit air.—n. Air′-ves′sel, a vessel or tube containing air.—adv. Air′wards, up in the air.—adj. Air′y, consisting of or relating to air: open to the air: like air: unsubstantial: light of heart: sprightly.—To take air, to get wind, to become publicly known. [Fr.—L. aër—Gr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tight binding

Tight binding

In solid-state physics, the tight-binding model is an approach to the calculation of electronic band structure using an approximate set of wave functions based upon superposition of wave functions for isolated atoms located at each atomic site. The method is closely related to the LCAO method used in chemistry. Tight-binding models are applied to a wide variety of solids. The model gives good qualitative results in many cases and can be combined with other models that give better results where the tight-binding model fails. Though the tight-binding model is a one-electron model, the model also provides a basis for more advanced calculations like the calculation of surface states and application to various kinds of many-body problem and quasiparticle calculations.

— Freebase

Dounce homogenizer

Dounce homogenizer

Invented by and named for Alexander Dounce , a Dounce homogenizer or "Douncer", is a cylindrical glass tube, closed at one end, with two glass pestles of carefully specified outer diameters, intended for the gentle homogenization of eukaryotic cells (e.g. mammalian cells). Dounce homogenizers are still commonly used today to isolate cellular organelles. The two Dounce homogenizer pestles (known as the "loose" or "A" and "tight" or "B" pestles), have a carefully specified outer diameter, relative to the inner diameter of the cylinder. The "A" (loose) pestle has a clearance from the cylinder wall of (~0.0025 - 0.0055 in.) while the "B" (tight) pestle has a clearance of (~0.0005 - 0.0025 in.). This allows for tissue and cells to be lysed by shear stress with minimal (if any) degree of heating, thereby leaving extracted organelles or heat-sensitive enzyme complexes largely intact. Typically, a soft tissue (e.g. mammalian liver) is cut or broken into smaller pieces and placed into the glass cylinder, alongside a suitable volume of an appropriate lysis buffer. Homogenization is performed by a defined number of "passes" of the pestles, first with the loose pestle, then with the tight pestle, up and down the cylinder. Five to ten passes are typical. Dounce homogenizers are typically produced from borosilicate glass, but are still fragile, and should be used with care. Especially hard or tough tissues should be pre-homogenized before use in a dounce homogenizer. Eukaryotic cells with tough cell walls, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cannot be directly lysed with a dounce homogenizer, unless the cell wall is first broken down (e.g. with lyticase, or zymolyase in the case of S. cerevisiae).

— Wikipedia

Season

Season

sē′zn, n. one of the four periods of the year: the usual or proper time for anything: any particular time: any period of time, esp. of some continuance, but not long: seasoning, relish.—v.t. to mature: to prepare for use: to accustom or fit for use by any process: to fit for the taste: to give relish to: to mingle: to moderate, temper, or qualify by admixture: to inure, imbue, tinge, or taint: to preserve from decay.—v.i. to become seasoned or matured: to grow fit for use: to become inured.—adj. Sea′sonable, happening in due season: occurring in good, suitable, or proper time: timely, opportune.—n. Sea′sonableness.—adv. Sea′sonably.—adj. Sea′sonal.—adv. Sea′sonally.—n. Sea′soner, one who, or that which, seasons: a sailor, &c., who hires for the season: a loafer, a beach-comber.—Season ticket (see Ticket).—Close season, close time; In season, ripe, fit and ready for use: allowed to be killed, fit to be eaten, edible; In season and out of season, at all times; Out of season, inopportune; The four seasons, the ember or fast days of the Church on days set apart in each of the four seasons. [O. Fr. seson (Fr. saison)—L. satio, -onis, seedtime.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pack

Pack

pak, n. a bundle made to be carried on the back: a collection, stock, or store: a bundle of some particular kind or quantity, as of wool, 480 or 240 lb.: the quantity of fish packed: a complete set of cards: a number of animals herding together or kept together for hunting: a number of persons combined for bad purposes: any great number: a large extent of floating and broken ice: a wet sheet for folding round the body to allay inflammation, fever, &c.—v.t. to press together and fasten up: to place in order: to crowd: to assort, bring together, select, or manipulate persons, cards, &c. for some unjust object: to send away, as from one's presence or employment: to surround a joint, &c., with any substance to prevent leaking, &c.—v.i. to store things away anywhere for safe keeping, &c.: to settle into a firm mass: to admit of being put into compact shape: to depart in haste.—ns. Pack′age, the act of packing, also something packed: a bundle or bale: a charge made for packing; Pack′-an′imal, a beast of burden used to carry goods on its back; Pack′-cinch (-sinsh), a wide girth of canvas, &c., having a hook and ring attached for adjusting the load of a pack-animal; Pack′-cloth, a cloth in which goods are tied up: packsheet; Pack′er, one who packs: one who cures and packs provisions: any device to fill the space between the tubing and the sides of an oil-well, &c.; Pack′et, a small package: a ship or vessel employed in carrying packets of letters, passengers, &c.: a vessel plying regularly between one port and another (also Pack′et-boat, Pack′et-ship, &c.).—v.t. to bind in a packet or parcel: to send in a packet.—ns. Pack′et-day, the day of the departure or arrival of a mail-ship; Pack′et-note (see Note-paper); Pack′-horse, a horse used to carry goods in panniers: a drudge; Pack′-ice, a collection of large pieces of floating ice; Pack′ing, the act of putting into packs or of tying up for carriage: material for packing: anything used to fill an empty space, or to make a joint close, as the elastic ring round a moving rod or piston to make it a tight fit; Pack′ing-box, -case, a box in which goods are packed: a hollow place round the opening of a steam cylinder, filled with some soft substance which, being pressed hard against the piston-rod, makes it a tight fit; Pack′ing-need′le, or Sack-needle, a strong needle for sewing up packages; Pack′ing-pā′per, a strong and thick kind of wrapping-paper; Pack′ing-press, a press for squeezing goods into small compass for packing; Pack′ing-sheet, or Pack′sheet, coarse cloth for packing goods; Pack′-load, the load an animal can carry on its back; Pack′man, a peddler or a man who carries a pack; Pack′-mule, a mule used for carrying burdens; Pack′-sadd′le, a saddle for packs or burdens; Pack′-thread, a coarse thread used to sew up packages; Pack′-train, a train of loaded pack-animals; Pack&prime

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hosiery

Hosiery

Hosiery, also referred to as legwear, describes garments worn directly on the feet and legs. The term originated as the collective term for products of which a maker or seller is termed a hosier; and those products are also known generically as hose. The term is also used for all types of knitted fabric, and its thickness and weight is defined in terms of denier or opacity. Lower denier measurements of 5 to 15 describe a hose which may be sheer in appearance, whereas styles of 40 and above are dense, with little to no light able to come through on 100 denier items. The first references to hosiery can be found in works of Hesiod, where Romans are said to have used leather or cloth in forms of strips to cover their lower body parts. Even the Egyptians are speculated to have used hosiery as socks have been found in certain tombs. Most hosiery garments are made by knitting methods. Modern hosiery is usually tight-fitting by virtue of stretchy fabrics and meshes. Older forms include binding to achieve a tight fit. Due to its close fit, most hosiery can be worn as an undergarment, but it is more commonly worn as a combined under/outer garment.

— Freebase

Pipe dope

Pipe dope

Pipe dope is any thread lubricant, thread sealing compound, and anaerobic chemical sealants that are used to make a pipe thread joint leak proof and pressure tight. Although common pipe threads are tapered and therefore will achieve an interference fit during proper assembly, machining and finishing variances usually result in a fit that does not result in 100 percent contact between the mating components. The application of pipe dope prior to assembly will fill the minute voids between the threads, thus making the joint pressure tight. Pipe dope also acts as a lubricant and helps prevent seizing of the mating parts, which can later cause difficulty during dissasembly.

— Freebase

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!