Synonyms containing tight fit Page #3

We've found 2,604 synonyms:

squeeze

squeeze

To fit into a tight place

— Wiktionary

zoot suit

zoot suit

An outfit featuring a suit with broad shoulders, a long coat, and baggy trousers that taper to a tight fit at the ankles.

— Wiktionary

salwar

salwar, shalwar

a pair of light loose trousers with a tight fit around the ankles; worn by women from the Indian subcontinent (usually with a kameez)

— Princeton's WordNet

shalwar

salwar, shalwar

a pair of light loose trousers with a tight fit around the ankles; worn by women from the Indian subcontinent (usually with a kameez)

— Princeton's WordNet

Socket wrench

Socket wrench

A socket wrench is a type of wrench or spanner that has a socket attached at one end, usually used to turn a fastener. The most prevalent form is the ratcheting socket wrench, often informally called a ratchet. A ratcheting socket wrench is the device within a hand tool in which a metal handle is attached to a ratcheting mechanism, which attaches to a socket. This in turn fits onto a type of bolt or nut. Pulled or pushed in one direction, the ratchet loosens or tightens the bolt or nut attached to the socket. Turned the other direction, the ratchet does not turn the socket but allows the ratchet handle to be re-positioned for another turn while staying attached to the bolt or nut. This ratcheting action allows the fastener to be rapidly tightened or loosened in small increments without disconnecting the tool from the fastener. A switch is built into the ratchet head that allows the user to apply the ratcheting action in either direction, as needed, to tighten or loosen a fastener. Other common methods of driving socket wrenches include pneumatic impact wrenches, hydraulic torque wrenches, torque multipliers and breaker bars. Some lesser known hybrid drivers include striking wrench tools with square drive, and hydraulic impact wrenches (typically powered by on site hydraulic power such as present with military tanks, and many rail car applications). Socket wrenches are most commonly hexagonal, or more commonly referred to as "6-point" in lay terms. Sockets are driven by being attached to the driving tool via a male/female square connection fitting (called the square drive). Standard sizes of square drives around the world include 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", 3/4", 1", 1-1/2", 2-1/2" and 3-1/2" square drive sizes (a de facto international standard with no metric equivalents) along with some lesser used drivers such as 5/8" square drive, and both #4 and #5 spline drives specified in ANSI B107 specifications. This wide range of square drive sizes provides for a wide variety of socket types and sizes to suit small to very large nuts and bolts. Some square drivers have a through hole to attach the socket to the driver (using a retaining ring with o-ring and pin type, or single piece molded retaining rings), a locking pin, or friction ball. Some common hand ratchets employ a quick release button on their top for quick socket release of smaller sockets.The tool chosen to drive the socket wrench ultimately supplies the mechanical advantage needed by the user to provide the torque needed to loosen or tighten the fastener as may be required. Larger drivers are typically used with higher torque, while smaller drivers are used for convenience in smaller low torque applications. Given the limits of human strength and fatigue, torque above 600 ft-lbs of torque will generally involve some kind of power assist, instead of the user simply pushing on the handle of a wrench. Very large sockets and drivers are typically powered by hydraulics to achieve torque. A socket is typically a cylinder which has a female six– or twelve-point recessed opening sized to fit over the common male hexagonal head of a bolt or nut fastener. The opposite end of the socket wrench has a standardized (ANSI B107, ISO, or other consensus standard) square recess to accept the socket wrench's drive size. Male drivers are also produced for use with socket head cap screws, and are often called Allen drivers (trademark) or the generic term male bit drivers The principal advantage of interchangeable sockets is that, instead of a separate wrench for each of the many different fastener sizes and types, only separate sockets are needed for each size and type. Because of their versatility, nearly all screw and bolt types now have sockets of different types made to fit their bolts or nuts. Sockets often come as a "socket set" with many different sizes or types of sockets to fit the heads of different-sized fasteners. A ratchet of the "set size" is often included with the socket set. Sockets are commonly available in fractional inch and metric sizes, and in short (shallow) and longer (deep) varieties.

— Wikipedia

Scatterplot smoothing

Scatterplot smoothing

In statistics, several scatterplot smoothing methods are available to fit a function through the points of a scatterplot to best represent the relationship between the variables. Scatterplots may be smoothed by fitting a line to the data points in a diagram. This line attempts to display the non-random component of the association between the variables in a 2D scatter plot. Smoothing attempts to separate the non-random behaviour in the data from the random fluctuations, removing or reducing these fluctuations, and allows prediction of the response based value of the explanatory variable.Smoothing is normally accomplished by using any one of the techniques mentioned below. A straight line (simple linear regression) A quadratic or a polynomial curve Local regression Smoothing splinesThe smoothing curve is chosen so as to provide the best fit in some sense, often defined as the fit that results in the minimum sum of the squared errors (a least squares criterion).

— Wikipedia

Strategic fit

Strategic fit

Strategic fit expresses the degree to which an organization is matching its resources and capabilities with the opportunities in the external environment. The matching takes place through strategy and it is therefore vital that the company has the actual resources and capabilities to execute and support the strategy. Strategic fit can be used actively to evaluate the current strategic situation of a company as well as opportunities such as M&A and divestitures of organizational divisions. Strategic fit is related to the Resource-based view of the firm which suggests that the key to profitability is not only through positioning and industry selection but rather through an internal focus which seeks to utilize the unique characteristics of the company’s portfolio of resources and capabilities. A unique combination of resources and capabilities can eventually be developed into a competitive advantage which the company can profit from. However, it is important to differentiate between resources and capabilities. Resources relate to the inputs to production owned by the company, whereas capabilities describe the accumulation of learning the company possesses.

— Wikipedia

game tight soldiers

game tight soldiers

Game Tight Soldier member tattoo from Prince George, as indicated on the bottom with the letters "P" and "G". The Game Tight Soldiers are a predominately Caucasian based street gang which started in the impoverished Downtown Eastside section of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada but then relocated north into Prince George, British Columbia. Founded by Steven King, Authorities allege that this gang (like many others) facilitate the activities of the Hells Angels through their puppet club The Renegades MC, who supply and are in charge of the Game Tight Soldiers. Bikers have long insulated themselves by using street gangs such as the Game Tight Soldiers, the Independent Soldiers and other street-level gangs to run their drug operations at retail level. Despite the fact both the GTS and the Independent Soldiers have relationships with The Renegades MC and the Hells Angels, the conflicts between the two imports over the crack cocaine trade, as well as other personal disputes, have been deadly. Today, younger local members of the gang are known for blatantly displaying their affiliation with the gang by either sporting "GTS-PG" (Prince George) tattoos, showing their origins are local or others with "GTS-EV", indicating they are from east Vancouver. Members are known for wearing black and red bandannas as well as clothing indicating the gang's moniker. The Game Tight Soldiers are rivals of the Independent Soldiers but are friendly towards the Hells Angels as well as their associate club The Renegades MC. Proceeds seized by Prince George RCMP from GTS member who was under investigation for possessing the proceeds of crime.

— Rap Dictionary

Packing

Packing

a yielding ring, as of metal, which surrounds a piston and maintains a tight fit, as inside a cylinder, etc

— Webster Dictionary

nest

nest

fit together or fit inside

— Princeton's WordNet

Wheelwright

Wheelwright

A wheelwright is a person who builds or repairs wooden wheels. The word is the combination of "wheel" and the archaic word "wright", which comes from the Old English word "wryhta", meaning a worker or maker. This occupational name eventually became the English surname Wheelwright. These tradesmen made wheels for carts and wagons by first constructing the hub, the spokes and the rim/fellows segments, and assembling them all into a unit working from the center of the wheel outwards. Most wheels were made from wood, but other materials have been used, such as bone and horn, for decorative or other purposes. Around the middle of the 19th century, iron strakes were replaced by a solid iron tyre custom made by a blacksmith, who first measured each wheel to ensure proper fit. Strakes were lengths of iron that were nailed to the outside of wheels to hold wooden wheels together. Strakes were replaced around the mid-19th century by more dependable iron tires that were fastened to the wooden wheel by both the tight fit of the tire/band as well as tire-bolts. Tire-bolts were less likely than tyre-nails to break off because they were flush with the wheel's outer surface. During the second half of the 19th century, the use of pre-manufactured iron hubs, and other factory-made wood, iron and rubber wheel parts became increasingly common.

— Freebase

Tights

Tights

Tights are a kind of cloth leg garment, most often sheathing the body from above the waist to the feet with a tight fit, hence the name. Wearing of tights has a history going back several centuries, when they were worn by men. Today, they are worn primarily by women and girls and some men and boys, as well as infants and toddlers of both sexes. In recent years, they have been sometimes offered as men's fashion. Athletic tights are already considered unisex. In American English, the difference between pantyhose and tights is determined in the weight of the yarn used and the thickness to which the garment is knitted. Generally, anything up to 40 denier is known as pantyhose and anything over can be classified as tights, as for example 'running tights' and 'cycling tights'. In the United Kingdom, the word "tights" is used in all cases when referring to pantyhose, and "leggings" for footless tights of heavier, normally opaque material. Tights can be sheer yet solid in colour, whereas leggings are almost or absolute opaque, not sheer. Thus the almost opaque tights are not suited as pants. There are many sub-classifications of tights or pantyhose that describe the precise construction. Although most tights are mainly nylon or cotton, lycra is normally included in modern blends to improve fit. Athletic tights are absolute opaque and often footless, although they may have a "stirrup" that goes under the foot to hold the cuff down near the ankle.

— Freebase

Fahnestock clip

Fahnestock clip

A Fahnestock clip is an early type of spring clamp electrical terminal for connections to bare wires. It is still used occasionally in educational electronic kits and teaching laboratories in schools. It is designed to grip a bare wire securely, yet release it with the push of a tab. The clip was patented February 26, 1907by John Schade Jr., assigned to Fahnestock Electric Co. Less than 2 weeks after the patent was issued they filed for reissue. It consists of a single flat piece of springy metal, bent over itself to form a clip. Pushing down on the end of the metal tab opens a hole through which a bare or stripped wire can be inserted. Releasing pressure allows the tab to spring back, closing the hole and gripping the wire to form an electrically sound mechanical connection. Pushing the tab again releases the grip on the wire so it can be withdrawn. Modern banana plugs will usually fit into a Fahnestock clip, although the fit is tight. Fahnestock clips were commonly made of phosphor bronze or spring steel and plated with tin or copper for good electrical conductivity and corrosion-resistance. Most Fahnestock clips seen today are nickel-plated. Fahnestock clips were seen on early radio receiver breadboard construction, model train power connections, and the like. Today, they have largely been supplanted by binding posts. However, they remain in use in elementary schools especially, where their ease of use and visible connections make them a popular way for science instructors to teach the creation of simple circuits, and most university physics departments still have them on apparatus.

— Freebase

Harsh voice

Harsh voice

Harsh voice, also called ventricular voice or (in some high-tone registers) pressed voice, is the production of speech sounds (typically vowels) with a constricted laryngeal cavity, which generally involves epiglottal co-articulation. Harsh voice includes the use of the ventricular folds (the false vocal cords) to damp the glottis in a way similar to what happens when a person talks while lifting a heavy load, or, if the sound is voiceless, like clearing one's throat. It contrasts with faucalized voice, which involves the expansion of the larynx. When the epiglottal co-articulation becomes a trill, the vowels are called strident. There is no symbol for harsh voice in the IPA. Diacritics seen in the literature include the under-tilde used for creaky voice, which may be appropriate when ambiguity is not a problem, the double under-tilde used as the ad hoc diacritic for strident vowels, which may be allophonic with harsh voice, and an ad hoc underline. In the VoQS, possibly relevant voice-quality symbols are {V!} ("harsh voice"), {V!!} ("ventricular phonation"), and {V͈} ("pressed phonation/tight voice"), but these are normally only placed on a capital vee for "voice". In VoQS usage, "harsh voice" does not involve vibration of the ventricular folds, while in "pressed" or "tight" voice the arytenoid cartilages adduct so that only the anterior ligamental vocal folds vibrate. The asterisk, IPA for articulations that do not have existing symbols, could also be used: ⟨◌͙⟩. The Bai language has both harsh ("pressed") and strident vowels as part of its register system, but they are not contrastive. The Bor dialect of Dinka has contrastive modal, breathy, faucalized, and harsh voice in its vowels, as well as three tones. (The ad hoc diacritics employed in the source are a subscript double quotation mark for faucalized voice, [a͈], and underlining for harsh voice, [a̱], a diacritic that indicates retraction in the IPA.) Examples are,

— Wikipedia

Wrestling singlet

Wrestling singlet

A wrestling singlet (or simply singlet) is a one-piece, tight-fitting, colored uniform, usually made of spandex/lycra, or nylon, used in amateur wrestling. The uniform is tight fitting so as not to get grasped accidentally by one's opponent, and allows the referee to see each wrestler's body clearly when awarding points or a pin. Unlike judo, it is illegal to grasp an opponent's clothing in all styles of amateur wrestling.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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A synonym for "drooping"
  • A. sagging
  • B. upright
  • C. erect
  • D. tense