Synonyms containing tight fit Page #5

We've found 2,604 synonyms:

Misfit

Misfit

mis-fit′, n. a bad fit, of clothes, &c.—v.t. to make of a wrong size: to supply with something that does not fit.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sabon

Sabon

Sabon is an old-style serif typeface designed by the German-born typographer and designer Jan Tschichold (1902–1974) in the period 1964–1967. It was released jointly by the Linotype, Monotype, and Stempel type foundries in 1967. The design of the roman is based on types by Claude Garamond (c. 1480–1561), particularly a specimen printed by the Frankfurt printer Konrad Berner. Berner had married the widow of a fellow printer Jacques Sabon, the source of the face's name, who had bought some of Garamond's type after his death. The italics are based on types designed by a contemporary of Garamond's, Robert Granjon. It is effectively a Garamond revival, though a different name was chosen as many other modern typefaces already carry this name. A classic typeface for body text, Sabon's longstanding popularity has transcended its origin as a commission to fit a tight set of business requirements. Tschichold was commissioned by a coalition of German printers to create a typeface that could be printed identically on Linotype, Monotype or letterpress equipment, simplifying the process of planning lines and pagination when printing a book. The italic and bold styles were to take up exactly as much space as the roman, a feature imposed by the duplexing system of Linotype hot metal typesetting machines of the period. Finally, the new font was to be five per cent narrower than their existing Monotype Garamond, in order to save space and money. Sabon's name was therefore considered appropriate: a Frenchman who had moved to Frankfurt, he had played a role in bringing Garamond's type into use in German printing four hundred years before.

— Wikipedia

Masonry trowel

Masonry trowel

The Masonry trowel is a hand trowel used in brickwork or stonework for leveling, spreading and shaping mortar or concrete. They come in several shapes and sizes depending on the task. The following is a list of the more common masonry trowels: Brick trowel: or mason's trowel is a point-nosed trowel for spreading mortar on bricks or concrete blocks with a technique called "buttering". The shape of the blade allows for very precise control of mortar placement. Bucket trowel: a wide-bladed tool for scooping mortar from a bucket; it is also good for buttering bricks and smoothing mortar. Concrete finishing trowel: is used to smooth a surface after the concrete has begun to set; it is held nearly level to the surface of the concrete, and moved with a sweeping arc across the surface. Corner trowels: used for shaping concrete around internal or external corners; the handle is located at the center of a 90-degree bend in the blade for balance and the ability to apply even pressure to both sides of a corner. Gauging trowel: a round-nosed trowel used for mixing mortar and applying small amounts in confined areas; it is also used to replace crumbled mortar and to patch concrete. Margin trowel: a flat-nosed trowel used to work mortar in tight spaces and corners where a larger pointed trowel will not fit. Pointing trowel: a smaller version of the brick trowel. Useful for filling in small cavities and repairing crumbling mortar joints. Pool trowel or round trowel: a variation of the concrete finishing trowel; rounded blade prevents it from digging into wet concrete. Step trowel: similar to the corner trowel, it is used for shaping inside angles on concrete steps; the center of the 90-degree bend in the blade allows for rounded edges. Tile setter: a brick trowel with an extra-wide blade to hold more mortar than a standard brick trowel. It is ideal for smoothing mortar on large bricks and blocks. Tuck pointer: used for neatly packing mortar between bricks and blocks when repointing and repairing crumbling mortar in masonry walls.

— Wikipedia

Residual sum of squares

Residual sum of squares

In statistics, the residual sum of squares (RSS), also known as the sum of squared residuals (SSR) or the sum of squared estimate of errors (SSE), is the sum of the squares of residuals (deviations predicted from actual empirical values of data). It is a measure of the discrepancy between the data and an estimation model. A small RSS indicates a tight fit of the model to the data. It is used as an optimality criterion in parameter selection and model selection. In general, total sum of squares = explained sum of squares + residual sum of squares. For a proof of this in the multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) case, see partitioning in the general OLS model.

— Wikipedia

Chelatase

Chelatase

In biochemistry, chelatases are enzymes that catalyze the insertion ("metalation") of naturally occurring tetrapyrroles. Many tetrapyrrole-based cofactors exist in nature including hemes, chlorophylls, and vitamin B12. These metallo cofactors are derived by the reaction of metal cations with tetrapyrroles, which are not ligands per se, but the conjugate acids thereof. In the case of ferrochelatases, the reaction that chelatases catalyze is: Fe2+ + H2P → FeP + 2 H+In the above equation H2P represents a sirohydrochlorin or a porphyrin, such as protoporphyrin IX. Chelatases are required because porphyrins and related macrocyclic ligands are extremely slow to metalate, despite favorable thermodynamics. These low rates are attributed to the tight fit of the metal into the rigid 18- or 17-membered tetrapyrrole macrocycle. Several families of chelatase are known including cobalt chelatase, magnesium chelatase, and ferrochelatase. Nickel insertion into a sirohydrochlorin also requires a chelatase as part of the biosynthesis of cofactor F430. Apparently that chelatase is identical to the cobalt chelatase.

— Wikipedia

Vacuum packing

Vacuum packing

Vacuum packing is a method of packaging that removes air from the package prior to sealing. This method involves (manually or automatically) placing items in a plastic film package, removing air from inside and sealing the package. Shrink film is sometimes used to have a tight fit to the contents. The intent of vacuum packing is usually to remove oxygen from the container to extend the shelf life of foods and, with flexible package forms, to reduce the volume of the contents and package.Vacuum packing reduces atmospheric oxygen, limiting the growth of aerobic bacteria or fungi, and preventing the evaporation of volatile components. It is also commonly used to store dry foods over a long period of time, such as cereals, nuts, cured meats, cheese, smoked fish, coffee, and potato chips (crisps). On a more short-term basis, vacuum packing can also be used to store fresh foods, such as vegetables, meats, and liquids, because it inhibits bacterial growth. Vacuum packing greatly reduces the bulk of non-food items. For example, clothing and bedding can be stored in bags evacuated with a domestic vacuum cleaner or a dedicated vacuum sealer. This technique is sometimes used to compact household waste, for example where a charge is made for each full bag collected. Vacuum packaging products, using plastic bags, canisters, bottles, or mason jars, are available for home use. For delicate food items that might be crushed by the vacuum packing process (such as potato chips), an alternative is to replace the interior gas with nitrogen. This has the same effect of inhibiting deterioration due to the removal of oxygen.

— Wikipedia

Chock

Chock

chok, v.t. to fasten as with a block or wedge.—n. a wedge to keep a cask from rolling: a log.—adjs. Chock′-full, Choke′-full, quite full; Chock′-tight, very tight. [See Choke.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Slack

Slack

slak, adj. lax or loose: not firmly extended or drawn out: not holding fast, weak: not eager or diligent, inattentive: not violent or rapid, slow.—adv. in a slack manner: partially: insufficiently.—n. that part of a rope, belt, &c. which is slack or loose: a period of inactivity: a slack-water haul of a net.—vs.i. Slack, Slack′en, to become loose or less tight: to be remiss: to abate: to become slower: to fail or flag.—v.t. to make less tight: to loosen: to relax: to remit: to abate: to withhold: to use less liberally: to check: (B.) to delay.—v.t. Slack′-bake, to half-bake.—adj.Slack′-hand′ed, remiss.—n. Slack′-jaw (slang), impudent talk.—adv. Slack′ly.—n. Slack′ness.—adj.Slack′-salt′ed, insufficiently salted.—n. Slack′-wa′ter, ebb-tide: slow-moving water, as that above a dam.—adj. pertaining to slack-water.—Slack away, to ease off freely; Slack-in-stays, slow in going about, of a ship; Slack off, to ease off; Slack up, to ease off: to slow. [A.S. sleac; Sw. slak, Ice. slakr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Strait

Strait

strāt, adj. difficult: distressful: (obs. strict, rigorous: narrow, so in B.).—n. a narrow pass in a mountain, or in the ocean between two portions of land: difficulty, distress.—v.t. to stretch, tighten: to distress.—v.t. Strait′en, to make strait or narrow: to confine: to draw tight: to distress: to put into difficulties.—adjs. Straight′-heart′ed, stingy; Strait′-laced, rigid or narrow in opinion.—adv. Strait′ly, narrowly: (B.) strictly.—ns. Strait′ness, state of being strait or narrow: strictness: (B.) distress or difficulty; Strait′-waist′coat, Strait′-jack′et, a dress made with long sleeves, which are tied behind, so that the arms are confined. [O. Fr. estreit, estrait (Fr. étroit)—L. strictus, pa.p. of stringĕre, to draw tight.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Stuff

Stuff

stuf, n. materials of which anything is made: that which fills anything: essence, elemental part: textile fabrics, cloth, esp. when woollen: something trifling, worthless, or contemptible: a melted mass of turpentine, tallow, &c. used for paying masts, planks, &c.: a medicinal mixture: boards for building: (slang) money: worthless matter: possessions generally, esp. household furniture, &c.—v.t. to fill by crowding: to fill very full: to press in: to crowd: to cram, as with nonsense or lies: to obstruct: to cause to bulge out by filling: to fill with seasoning, as a fowl: to fill the skin of a dead animal, so as to reproduce its living form.—v.i. to feed gluttonously: to practise taxidermy.—ns. Stuff′er, one who stuffs, esp. the skins of animals; Stuff′-gown, a gown of stuff, not silk, esp. that of a junior barrister; Stuff′ing, that which is used to stuff or fill anything—straw, sawdust, feathers, hair, &c.: relishing ingredients put into meat, poultry, &c. in cooking; Stuff′ing-box, a contrivance for keeping a piston-rod, &c., air-tight or water-tight by means of closely-fitting packing, while allowing it free motion. [O. Fr. estoffe (Fr. étoffe)—L. stuppa, tow.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Taut

Taut

Taught, tawt, adj. tightly drawn: in good condition.—v.t. Taut′en, to make tight.—n. Taut′ness. [A form of tight.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Twang

Twang

twang, n. a sharp, quick sound, as of a tight string when pulled and let go: a nasal tone of voice.—v.i. to sound as a tight string pulled and let go: to sound with a quick, sharp noise: to have a nasal sound.—v.t. to make to sound with a twang.—v.i. Twang′le, to twang frequently.—v.t. to cause to twangle. [Tang.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

grommet

grommet

Consists of a ring of rope-yarn, with two pieces of strong twine tied across at right angles to each other. Grommets are used as wads for cannon. The size of the ring is the full diameter of the bore of the piece, in order that it may fit tight, and stop the windage. They increase the accuracy of fire, and are to be preferred when the object of the wad is merely to retain the projectile in its place, as in firing at a depression. They stop the windage best when placed behind the projectile.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

-able

-able

an adjective suffix now usually in a passive sense; able to be; fit to be; expressing capacity or worthiness in a passive sense; as, movable, able to be moved; amendable, able to be amended; blamable, fit to be blamed; salable

— Webster Dictionary

Adapt

Adapt

to make suitable; to fit, or suit; to adjust; to alter so as to fit for a new use; -- sometimes followed by to or for

— Webster Dictionary

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An antonym of "besotted"
  • A. affluent
  • B. sober
  • C. flush
  • D. stringent