Synonyms containing tight junctions

We've found 877 synonyms:

Tight end

Tight end

The tight end is a position in American football on the offense. The tight end is often seen as a hybrid position with the characteristics and roles of both an offensive lineman and a wide receiver. Like offensive linemen, they are usually lined up on the offensive line and are large enough to be effective blockers. On the other hand, they are eligible receivers adept enough to warrant a defense's attention when running pass patterns. Because of the hybrid nature of the position, the tight end's role in any given offense depends on the tactical preferences and philosophy of the head coach. In some systems, the tight end will merely act as a sixth offensive lineman rarely going out for passes. Other systems utilize the tight end primarily as a receiver, frequently taking advantage of the tight end's size to create mismatches in the defensive secondary. Many coaches will often have one tight end who specializes in blocking in running situations while utilizing a better pass catching tight end in obvious passing situations. Offensive formations may have between zero and two tight ends at one time. If a wide receiver is present in a formation, but outside the tight end, the wide receiver must be positioned behind the line of scrimmage. If two tight ends are on the same side of the line of scrimmage, one must be behind the line of scrimmage.

— Freebase

Tight oil

Tight oil

For another use of the term "shale oil", meaning synthetic crude oil derived from oil shale, see shale oil.Tight oil (also known as shale oil, shale-hosted oil or light tight oil, abbreviated LTO) is light crude oil contained in petroleum-bearing formations of low permeability, often shale or tight sandstone. Economic production from tight oil formations requires the same hydraulic fracturing and often uses the same horizontal well technology used in the production of shale gas. While sometimes called "shale oil", tight oil should not be confused with oil shale, which is shale rich in kerogen, or shale oil, which is oil produced from oil shales. Therefore, the International Energy Agency recommends using the term "light tight oil" for oil produced from shales or other very low permeability formations, while the World Energy Resources 2013 report by the World Energy Council uses the terms "tight oil" and "shale-hosted oil". In May 2013 the International Energy Agency in its Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) said that the North American oil production surge led by unconventional oils - US light tight oil (LTO) and Canadian oil sands - had produced a global supply shock that would reshape the way oil is transported, stored, refined and marketed.

— Wikipedia

Cell junction

Cell junction

Cell junctions (or intercellular bridges) are a class of cellular structures consisting of multiprotein complexes that provide contact or adhesion between neighboring cells or between a cell and the extracellular matrix in animals. They also maintain the paracellular barrier of epithelia and control paracellular transport. Cell junctions are especially abundant in epithelial tissues. Combined with cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix, cell junctions help hold animal cells together. Cell junctions are also especially important in enabling communication between neighboring cells via specialized protein complexes called communicating (gap) junctions. Cell junctions are also important in reducing stress placed upon cells. In plants, similar communication channels are known as plasmodesmata, and in fungi they are called septal pores.

— Wikipedia

Tight

Tight

close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; -- often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight

— Webster Dictionary

Tight

Tight

tīt, adj. close: compact: rigid: hampered from want of money: snug, trim: not leaky: fitting closely, also too closely: scarce, not easily obtainable: (coll.) unwilling to part with money: tipsy: not loose or free in treatment.—v.t. Tight′en, to make tight or tighter: to straiten.—v.i. to grow tight or tighter.—n. Tight′ener, one who, or that which, tightens: (anat.) a tensor: (slang) a heavy meal.—adv. Tight′ly.—ns. Tight′ness; Tight′rope, a tightly-stretched rope on which rope-dancers perform.—n.pl. Tights, a garment often of silk, closely fitting the body, or at least the legs, worn by acrobats, dancers, &c. [Scand., Ice. þéitr; cf. Dan. tæt, Dut. digt, Ger. dicht.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Innexin

Innexin

An innexin is a member of a family of proteins that create gap junctions in invertebrates. The innexin proteins have four transmembrane spanning units and, like the vertebrate connexin gap junction protein, six innexin subunits together form a channel, an "innexon", in the plasma membrane between the inside and outside of the cell. Two innexons in apposed plasma membranes can form a gap junction. Innexin genes have homologues in vertebrates called pannexins. However, increasing evidence suggests that pannexons do not form gap junctions unless overexpressed in tissue. Thus, pannexins and innexins differ functionality and should be treated as separate families. These proteins have been named innexins. Gap junctions are composed of membrane proteins that form a channel permeable to ions and small molecules connecting the cytoplasm of adjacent cells. Although gap junctions provide similar functions in all multicellular organisms, until the late 1990s it was not known what proteins invertebrates used for this purpose. While the connexin family of gap junction proteins was well-characterised in vertebrates, no homologs were found in non-chordates. Gap junction molecules with no sequence homology to connexins were initially identified in fruit flies. It was suggested that these proteins are specific invertebrate gap junctions, and they were thus named "innexins". They were later identified in diverse invertebrates. Once the human genome was sequenced, innexin homologs were identified in humans and then in other vertebrates, indicating their ubiquitous distribution in the animal kingdom. They were called "pannexins".

— Freebase

Blood–testis barrier

Blood–testis barrier

The blood–testis barrier is a physical barrier between the blood vessels and the seminiferous tubules of the animal testes. The name "blood-testis barrier" is misleading in that it is not a blood-organ barrier in a strict sense, but is formed between Sertoli cells of the seminiferous tubule and as such isolates the further developed stages of germ cells from the blood. A more correct term is the "Sertoli cell barrier". The barrier is formed by tight junctions, adherens junctions and gap junctions between the Sertoli cells, which are sustentacular cells of the seminiferous tubules, and divides the seminiferous tubule in a basal compartment and an adluminal compartment. The presence of the SCB allows Sertoli cells to control the adluminal environment in which germ cells develop by influencing the chemical composition of the luminal fluid. The barrier also prevents passage of cytotoxic agents into the seminiferous tubules.

— Freebase

Adherens junction

Adherens junction

Adherens junctions are protein complexes that occur at cell–cell junctions in epithelial tissues, usually more basal than tight junctions. An adherens junction is defined as a cell junction whose cytoplasmic face is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. They can appear as bands encircling the cell or as spots of attachment to the extracellular matrix. A similar cell junction in non-epithelial cells is the fascia adherens. It is structurally the same, but appears in ribbonlike patterns that do not completely encircle the cells. One example is in cardiomyocytes.

— Freebase

Tight junction

Tight junction

Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, are the closely associated areas of two cells whose membranes join together forming a virtually impermeable barrier to fluid. It is a type of junctional complex present only in vertebrates. The corresponding junctions that occur in invertebrates are septate junctions.

— Freebase

Endothelial Cells

Endothelial Cells

Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Joskid Chizcheese

Joskid Chizcheese

A submission from Nigeria says the name Chizzy means "Gift of God/God's Gift" and is of African origin. So chiZ from Joskid Chizcheese also means "Gift of God/ God's Gift" due to the same pronunciation. CHEESE from chiZcheese means an uncountable slang for money. Joskid Chizcheese is a constructive name with three different junctions that led to the meaning. The three different junctions are; Joskid, ChiZ and Cheese. Joskid Chizcheese is a person that is Inventive, Intelligent, Devoted to whatever he or she does, Musicial, Social, God fearing and an entity that device means to make the impossibles possible.

— Editors Contribution

Occludin

Occludin

Occludin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the OCLN gene. Occludin is a 65-kDa integral plasma-membrane protein located at the tight junctions, described for the first time in 1993 by Shoichiro Tsukita. Together with the Claudin group of proteins, it is the main component of the tight junctions.

— Freebase

occludin

occludin

Any of a family of plasma-membrane protein located at tight junctions

— Wiktionary

Air

Air

ār, n. the fluid we breathe: the atmosphere: any special condition of atmosphere, as in 'the night-air,' 'to take the air:' a light breeze: publicity: the bearing of a person: outward appearance, manner, look: an assumed or affected manner: (mus.) a rhythmical melody: a song, also specially a sprightly song: the soprano part in a harmonised composition, being that which gives it its character: (pl.) affectation.—v.t. to expose to the air: to dry: to expose to warm air: (obs.) to take an airing.—ns. Air′-bath, an arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature; Air′-bed, a bed for the sick, inflated with air; Air′-blad′der, in some fishes, an organ containing air, by which they maintain their equilibrium in the water; Air′-brake, a railway brake worked by compressed air.—adj. Air′-built, built in air: having no solid foundation.—ns. Air′-cell, a cavity containing air; Air′-cush′ion, an air-tight cushion, which can be inflated; Air′-drain, an ample space at the foot of foundation walls, for the sake of dryness.—adj. Air′drawn, drawn in air: visionary: (Shak.) imaginary.—ns. Air′-en′gine, an engine put in motion by air expanded by heat; Air′-gas, illuminating gas made by charging atmospheric air with vapour of petroleum or other hydrocarbon; Air′-gun, a gun which discharges bullets by means of compressed air.—adv. Air′ily, gaily.—ns. Air′iness, state of being airy; openness: liveliness; Air′ing, exposure to the air or fire: a short excursion in the open air; Air′-jack′et, a jacket with air-tight cavities, which being inflated renders a person buoyant in water.—adj. Air′less, void of air: not having free communication with the open air.—ns. Air′-lock, a small chamber for the entrance and exit of men and materials, at the top of the caisson or hollow cylinder used for founding the piers of bridges under water; Air′-pump, an instrument for pumping the air out of a vessel; Air′-sac, an air-cell or air-space, esp. in the bones of birds; Air′-shaft, a passage for air into a mine; Air′-ship, a navigable balloon; Air′-space, the cubic content of a room, hospital-ward, or the like, with reference to the respirable air contained in it.—adj. Air′-tight, so tight as not to admit air.—n. Air′-ves′sel, a vessel or tube containing air.—adv. Air′wards, up in the air.—adj. Air′y, consisting of or relating to air: open to the air: like air: unsubstantial: light of heart: sprightly.—To take air, to get wind, to become publicly known. [Fr.—L. aër—Gr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tight binding

Tight binding

In solid-state physics, the tight-binding model is an approach to the calculation of electronic band structure using an approximate set of wave functions based upon superposition of wave functions for isolated atoms located at each atomic site. The method is closely related to the LCAO method used in chemistry. Tight-binding models are applied to a wide variety of solids. The model gives good qualitative results in many cases and can be combined with other models that give better results where the tight-binding model fails. Though the tight-binding model is a one-electron model, the model also provides a basis for more advanced calculations like the calculation of surface states and application to various kinds of many-body problem and quasiparticle calculations.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. perky
  • B. floaty
  • C. heavy
  • D. chirpy