Synonyms containing tight lips

We've found 1,237 synonyms:

Lip

Lip

lip, n. the muscular border in front of the teeth by which things are taken into the mouth; the edge of anything: (slang) impudent talk, insolence: (pl.) speech as passing through the lips.—v.t. to touch with the lips: to utter with the lips.—v.i. to apply the lips to the mouthpiece of an instrument.—adj. Lip′born, from the lips only: not genuine.—ns. Lip′-devō′tion, prayer of the lips without devotion in the heart; Lip′-hom′age, insincere homage; Lip′-lā′bour, empty speech; Lip′-lang′uage, oral or articulate language, communicated by motions of the lips, as opposed to the fingers, in teaching or conversing with the deaf and dumb; Lip′let, a little lip; Lip′-or′nament, an object inserted as an ornament in the lip, common among savage tribes.—adj. Lipped, having lips, or edges like lips, labiate.—ns. Lip′-read′ing, reading what a person says from the movement of the lips, in the instruction of the deaf and dumb; Lip′-serv′ice, service with the lips only: insincere devotion or worship; Lip′-wis′dom, wisdom in words only, not in deeds.—Bite the lip, to press the lips between the teeth to keep one's self from betraying vexation, anger, &c.; Curl of the lip, the causing the lip to curl as an indication of scorn; Hang the lip, to be sullen or sulky; Make a lip (Shak.), to pout in sullenness or contempt. [A.S. lippa; Dut. lip, Ger. lippe, L. labium, not conn. with L. lambĕre, Eng. lap.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tight end

Tight end

The tight end is a position in American football on the offense. The tight end is often seen as a hybrid position with the characteristics and roles of both an offensive lineman and a wide receiver. Like offensive linemen, they are usually lined up on the offensive line and are large enough to be effective blockers. On the other hand, they are eligible receivers adept enough to warrant a defense's attention when running pass patterns. Because of the hybrid nature of the position, the tight end's role in any given offense depends on the tactical preferences and philosophy of the head coach. In some systems, the tight end will merely act as a sixth offensive lineman rarely going out for passes. Other systems utilize the tight end primarily as a receiver, frequently taking advantage of the tight end's size to create mismatches in the defensive secondary. Many coaches will often have one tight end who specializes in blocking in running situations while utilizing a better pass catching tight end in obvious passing situations. Offensive formations may have between zero and two tight ends at one time. If a wide receiver is present in a formation, but outside the tight end, the wide receiver must be positioned behind the line of scrimmage. If two tight ends are on the same side of the line of scrimmage, one must be behind the line of scrimmage.

— Freebase

Tight oil

Tight oil

For another use of the term "shale oil", meaning synthetic crude oil derived from oil shale, see shale oil.Tight oil (also known as shale oil, shale-hosted oil or light tight oil, abbreviated LTO) is light crude oil contained in petroleum-bearing formations of low permeability, often shale or tight sandstone. Economic production from tight oil formations requires the same hydraulic fracturing and often uses the same horizontal well technology used in the production of shale gas. While sometimes called "shale oil", tight oil should not be confused with oil shale, which is shale rich in kerogen, or shale oil, which is oil produced from oil shales. Therefore, the International Energy Agency recommends using the term "light tight oil" for oil produced from shales or other very low permeability formations, while the World Energy Resources 2013 report by the World Energy Council uses the terms "tight oil" and "shale-hosted oil". In May 2013 the International Energy Agency in its Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) said that the North American oil production surge led by unconventional oils - US light tight oil (LTO) and Canadian oil sands - had produced a global supply shock that would reshape the way oil is transported, stored, refined and marketed.

— Wikipedia

Tight

Tight

close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; -- often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight

— Webster Dictionary

Tight

Tight

tīt, adj. close: compact: rigid: hampered from want of money: snug, trim: not leaky: fitting closely, also too closely: scarce, not easily obtainable: (coll.) unwilling to part with money: tipsy: not loose or free in treatment.—v.t. Tight′en, to make tight or tighter: to straiten.—v.i. to grow tight or tighter.—n. Tight′ener, one who, or that which, tightens: (anat.) a tensor: (slang) a heavy meal.—adv. Tight′ly.—ns. Tight′ness; Tight′rope, a tightly-stretched rope on which rope-dancers perform.—n.pl. Tights, a garment often of silk, closely fitting the body, or at least the legs, worn by acrobats, dancers, &c. [Scand., Ice. þéitr; cf. Dan. tæt, Dut. digt, Ger. dicht.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Labia minora

Labia minora

The labia minora, also known as the inner labia, inner lips, vaginal lips, or nymphae, are two flaps of skin on either side of the human vaginal opening, situated between the labia majora. Inner lips vary widely in size, colour, and shape from woman to woman. The inner lips extend from the clitoris obliquely downward, laterally, and backward on either side of the vulval vestibule, ending between the bottom of the vulval vestibule and the outer lips. The posterior ends of the inner lips are usually joined across the middle line by a fold of skin, named the frenulum labiorum pudendi or fourchette. On the front, each lip divides into two portions. The upper part of each lip passes above the clitoris to meet the upper part of the other lip—which will often be a little larger or smaller—forming a fold which overhangs the glans clitoridis; this fold is named the preputium clitoridis. The lower part passes beneath the glans clitoridis and becomes united to its under surface, forming, with the inner lip of the opposite side, the frenulum clitoridis. On the opposed surfaces of the labia minora are numerous sebaceous glands not associated with hair follicles.

— Freebase

Labial

Labial

lā′bi-al, adj. pertaining to the lips: formed by the lips.—n. a sound formed by the lips: a letter representing a sound formed either by both the lips, or by the upper lip and under teeth—p, b, m, f, v.—v.t. Lā′bialise.—adv. Lā′bially.—n.pl. Labiā′tæ, a natural order of gamopetalous plants, the mint family having four-cornered stems and opposite branches.—adjs. Lā′biate, -d (bot.), having two unequal divisions, as in the monopetalous corolla of the mints.—adj. and n. Labioden′tal, of a sound pronounced both by the lips and teeth: a letter representing such (f, v.).—n. Lā′bium, a lip or lip-like part:—pl. Lā′bia. [Fr.,—L. labium, labrum, a lip.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lip balm

Lip balm

Lip balm or lip salve is a wax-like substance applied topically to the lips of the mouth to relieve chapped or dry lips, angular cheilitis, stomatitis, or cold sores. Lip balm often contains beeswax or carnauba wax, camphor, cetyl alcohol, lanolin, paraffin, and petrolatum, among other ingredients. Some varieties contain dyes, flavor, fragrance, menthol, phenol, salicylic acid, and sunscreens. The primary purpose of lip balm is to provide an occlusive layer on the lip surface to seal moisture in lips and protect them from external exposure. Dry air, cold temperatures, and wind all have a drying effect on skin by drawing moisture away from the body. Lips are particularly vulnerable because the skin is so thin, and thus they are often the first to present signs of dryness. Occlusive materials like waxes and petroleum jelly prevent moisture loss and maintain lip comfort while flavorants, colorants, sunscreens, and various medicaments can provide additional, specific benefits. Lip balm can be applied where a finger is used to apply it to the lips, or in a lipstick-style tube from which it can be applied directly. Lip balm was first marketed in the 1880s by the creator of ChapStick, Charles Browne Fleet, though its origins are commonly traced to earwax, which was used as lip balm prior to that.

— Freebase

Lip liner

Lip liner

Lip liner, also known as a lip pencil, is a cosmetic product. It is intended to fill in uneven areas on the outer edges of the lips before applying lipstick to give a smoother shape. It is also used to outline the lips, keeping lipstick inside the lip area and preventing it from "bleeding", creating a bigger contrast and making the lips stand out more. Alternatively, lip liner can be used to fill in the entire lip before the application of lipstick, and in some cases is worn as a lipstick on its own. The product is usually sold in a retractable tube or pencil form which can be sharpened. Lip liner is usually available in the same range of colors as lipsticks: e.g., reds, pinks, browns, plums, etc. Lip liner also comes in invisible, for giving the illusion of smooth lips without adding or affecting color.

— Wikipedia

Cheiloplasty

Cheiloplasty

Cheiloplasty or lip reduction is the technical term for surgery of the lip. It includes lip reduction, the process of surgically reducing the size of the lip or lips in order to reduce the appearance of abnormally large or protruding lips, as well as the process of forming an artificial tip or part of the lips by using a piece of healthy tissue from some neighboring part. The procedure can also be performed to enhance the upper and lower lip for those who wish to make their lips permanently larger.

— Freebase

jug

jug

The jug as a musical instrument reached its height of popularity in the 1920s, when jug bands, such as Cannon's Jug Stompers were popular. The jug is an empty jug played with the mouth. With an embouchure like that used for a brass instrument, the musician holds the mouth of the jug about an inch from his or her mouth and emits a blast of sound, made by a buzzing of the lips, directly into it. The jug does not touch the musician's mouth, but serves as a resonating chamber to amplify and enrich the sound made by the musician's lips. Changes in pitch are controlled by loosening or tightening the lips. An accomplished jug player might have a two-octave range. Some players augment this sound with vocalizations, didgeridoo style, and even circular breathing. In performance, the jug sound is enhanced if the player stands with his back to a wall, which will reflect the sound towards the audience. The stovepipe is played in much the same manner, with the open-ended pipe being the resonating chamber. There is some similarity to the didgeridoo, but there is no contact between the stovepipe and the player's lips.

— Freebase

Air

Air

ār, n. the fluid we breathe: the atmosphere: any special condition of atmosphere, as in 'the night-air,' 'to take the air:' a light breeze: publicity: the bearing of a person: outward appearance, manner, look: an assumed or affected manner: (mus.) a rhythmical melody: a song, also specially a sprightly song: the soprano part in a harmonised composition, being that which gives it its character: (pl.) affectation.—v.t. to expose to the air: to dry: to expose to warm air: (obs.) to take an airing.—ns. Air′-bath, an arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature; Air′-bed, a bed for the sick, inflated with air; Air′-blad′der, in some fishes, an organ containing air, by which they maintain their equilibrium in the water; Air′-brake, a railway brake worked by compressed air.—adj. Air′-built, built in air: having no solid foundation.—ns. Air′-cell, a cavity containing air; Air′-cush′ion, an air-tight cushion, which can be inflated; Air′-drain, an ample space at the foot of foundation walls, for the sake of dryness.—adj. Air′drawn, drawn in air: visionary: (Shak.) imaginary.—ns. Air′-en′gine, an engine put in motion by air expanded by heat; Air′-gas, illuminating gas made by charging atmospheric air with vapour of petroleum or other hydrocarbon; Air′-gun, a gun which discharges bullets by means of compressed air.—adv. Air′ily, gaily.—ns. Air′iness, state of being airy; openness: liveliness; Air′ing, exposure to the air or fire: a short excursion in the open air; Air′-jack′et, a jacket with air-tight cavities, which being inflated renders a person buoyant in water.—adj. Air′less, void of air: not having free communication with the open air.—ns. Air′-lock, a small chamber for the entrance and exit of men and materials, at the top of the caisson or hollow cylinder used for founding the piers of bridges under water; Air′-pump, an instrument for pumping the air out of a vessel; Air′-sac, an air-cell or air-space, esp. in the bones of birds; Air′-shaft, a passage for air into a mine; Air′-ship, a navigable balloon; Air′-space, the cubic content of a room, hospital-ward, or the like, with reference to the respirable air contained in it.—adj. Air′-tight, so tight as not to admit air.—n. Air′-ves′sel, a vessel or tube containing air.—adv. Air′wards, up in the air.—adj. Air′y, consisting of or relating to air: open to the air: like air: unsubstantial: light of heart: sprightly.—To take air, to get wind, to become publicly known. [Fr.—L. aër—Gr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cardinal vowels

Cardinal vowels

Cardinal vowels are a set of reference vowels used by phoneticians in describing the sounds of languages. They are classified depending on the position of the tongue relative to the roof of the mouth, how far forward or back is the highest point of the tongue and the position of the lips, either rounded or unrounded. For instance, the vowel of the English word "feet" can be described with reference to cardinal vowel 1, [i], which is the cardinal vowel closest to it. It is often stated that to be able to use the cardinal vowel system effectively one must undergo training with an expert phonetician, working both on the recognition and the production of the vowels. Daniel Jones wrote "The values of cardinal vowels cannot be learnt from written descriptions; they should be learnt by oral instruction from a teacher who knows them".A cardinal vowel is a vowel sound produced when the tongue is in an extreme position, either front or back, high or low. The current system was systematised by Daniel Jones in the early 20th century, though the idea goes back to earlier phoneticians, notably Ellis and Bell.Cardinal vowels are not vowels of any particular language, but a measuring system. However, some languages contain vowel or vowels that are close to the cardinal vowel(s). An example of such language is Ngwe, which is spoken in Cameroon. It has been cited as a language with a vowel system that has 8 vowels which are rather similar to the 8 primary cardinal vowels (Ladefoged 1971:67). Three of the cardinal vowels—[i], [ɑ] and [u]—have articulatory definitions. The vowel [i] is produced with the tongue as far forward and as high in the mouth as is possible (without producing friction), with spread lips. The vowel [u] is produced with the tongue as far back and as high in the mouth as is possible, with protruded lips. This sound can be approximated by adopting the posture to whistle a very low note, or to blow out a candle. And [ɑ] is produced with the tongue as low and as far back in the mouth as possible. The other vowels are 'auditorily equidistant' between these three 'corner vowels', at four degrees of aperture or 'height': close (high tongue position), close-mid, open-mid, and open (low tongue position). These degrees of aperture plus the front-back distinction define 8 reference points on a mixture of articulatory and auditory criteria. These eight vowels are known as the eight 'primary cardinal vowels', and vowels like these are common in the world's languages. The lip positions can be reversed with the lip position for the corresponding vowel on the opposite side of the front-back dimension, so that e.g. Cardinal 1 can be produced with rounding somewhat similar to that of Cardinal 8 (though normally compressed rather than protruded); these are known as 'secondary cardinal vowels'. Sounds such as these are claimed to be less common in the world's languages. Other vowel sounds are also recognised on the vowel chart of the International Phonetic Alphabet.

— Wikipedia

Kiss

Kiss

kis, v.t. to press one's lips to in affection or reverence: to treat with fondness: to touch gently: to collide (of two billiard-balls).—v.i. to salute with the lips.—n. a salute with the lips.—ns. Kiss′-curl, a small curl at the side of the forehead; Kiss′er; Kiss′ing-com′fit, a perfumed comfit for sweetening the breath; Kiss′ing-crust, that part of the upper crust of the loaf which, while baking, overhangs the edge and touches another.—n.pl. Kiss′ing-strings, cap or bonnet strings tied under the chin.—n. Kiss′-me, the wild form of Viola tricolor, the pansy: a short veil: a small bonnet—also Kiss′-me-quick.—Kiss hands, to kiss the sovereign's hands on a minister's acceptance of office; Kiss of peace, a kiss of greeting exchanged between the members of the early Church, a shadow of which survives in the kissing of the pax at high mass; Kiss the book, to kiss a copy of the New Testament, in England, after taking a legal oath; Kiss the dust, to be felled to the ground, to be slain or vanquished; Kiss the gunner's daughter, to get a flogging, tied to the breech of a cannon; Kiss the rod, to submit to punishment. [A.S. cyssan, to kiss—coss, a kiss; Ger. küssen, Dan. kys; allied to choose and gust.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tight binding

Tight binding

In solid-state physics, the tight-binding model is an approach to the calculation of electronic band structure using an approximate set of wave functions based upon superposition of wave functions for isolated atoms located at each atomic site. The method is closely related to the LCAO method used in chemistry. Tight-binding models are applied to a wide variety of solids. The model gives good qualitative results in many cases and can be combined with other models that give better results where the tight-binding model fails. Though the tight-binding model is a one-electron model, the model also provides a basis for more advanced calculations like the calculation of surface states and application to various kinds of many-body problem and quasiparticle calculations.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. adversary
  • B. opposer
  • C. opponent
  • D. protagonist