Synonyms containing vital spark

We've found 1,061 synonyms:

Sparkle

Sparkle

spärk′l, n. a little spark: lustre, brilliance: the presence of carbon dioxide, as in a wine, causing effervescence: the emission of sparks.—v.i. to emit sparks: to shine, glitter: to effervesce with glittering bubbles, or to contain much carbon dioxide, as certain wines.—v.t. to throw out sparklingly.—n. Spark′ler, one who, or that which, sparkles.—adj. Spark′less, not giving out sparks.—adv. Spark′lessly.—n. Spark′let, a small spark.—adj. Spark′ling, giving out sparks: glittering: brilliant: lively.—adv. Spark′lingly, in a sparkling manner: with vivid and twinkling lustre.—n. Spark′lingness, the quality of being sparkling: vivid and twinkling lustre. [A freq. of spark.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spark plug

Spark plug

A spark plug is a device for delivering electric current from an ignition system to the combustion chamber of a spark-ignition engine to ignite the compressed fuel/air mixture by an electric spark, while containing combustion pressure within the engine. A spark plug has a metal threaded shell, electrically isolated from a central electrode by a porcelain insulator. The central electrode, which may contain a resistor, is connected by a heavily insulated wire to the output terminal of an ignition coil or magneto. The spark plug's metal shell is screwed into the engine's cylinder head and thus electrically grounded. The central electrode protrudes through the porcelain insulator into the combustion chamber, forming one or more spark gaps between the inner end of the central electrode and usually one or more protuberances or structures attached to the inner end of the threaded shell and designated the "side", "earth", or "ground" electrode. Spark plugs may also be used for other purposes; in Saab Direct Ignition when they are not firing, spark plugs are used to measure ionization in the cylinders - this ionic current measurement is used to replace the ordinary cam phase sensor, knock sensor and misfire measurement function. Spark plugs may also be used in other applications such as furnaces wherein a combustible fuel/air mixture must be ignited. In this case, they are sometimes referred to as flame igniters.

— Freebase

Civil registration

Civil registration

Civil registration is the system by which a government records the vital events (births, marriages, and deaths) of its citizens and residents. The resulting repository or database has different names in different countries and even in different US states. It can be called a civil registry, civil register (but this is also an official term for an individual file of a vital event), vital records, and other terms, and the office responsible for receiving the registrations can be called a bureau of vital statistics, registry of vital records and statistics, registrar, registry, register, registry office (officially register office), or population registry. The primary purpose of civil registration is to create a legal document that can be used to establish and protect the rights of individuals. A secondary purpose is to create a data source for the compilation of vital statistics. The United Nations General Assembly in 1979 adopted the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, Article 16 of which requires countries to establish compulsory civil registration of marriages. Most countries have a legal requirement for relevant authority to be notified of certain life events, such as births, marriages and deaths. The first country to establish a nationwide population register was France in 1539, using the registers of the Catholic Church. Sweden followed in 1631, on the basis of a register drawn up by the Church of Sweden on behalf of the Swedish king. The United Nations defines civil registration as "the continuous, permanent, compulsory and universal recording of the occurrence and characteristics of vital events pertaining to the population as provided through decree or regulation in accordance with the legal requirements of a country. Civil registration is carried out primarily for the purpose of establishing the legal documents required by law. These records are also a main source of vital statistics. Complete coverage, accuracy and timeliness of civil registration are essential to ensure the quality of vital statistics."Vital events that are typically recorded on the register include live birth, death, foetal death, name, change of name, marriage, divorce, annulment of marriage, judicial separation of marriage, adoption, legitimization and recognition. Among the legal documents that are derived from civil registration are birth certificates, death certificates, and marriage certificates. A family register is a type of civil register which is more concerned with events within the family unit and is common in Continental European and Asian countries, such as Germany (Familienbuch), France, Spain, China (Hukou), Japan (Koseki), and North and South Korea (Hoju). Additionally, in some countries, immigration, emigration, and any change of residence may require notification. A register of residents is a type of civil register primarily concerned with the current residence.

— Wikipedia

Vital

Vital

vī′tal, adj. belonging or contributing to life: containing or necessary to life: important as life: essential.—n. Vītalisā′tion.—v.t. Vī′talise, to make vital or alive: to give life to or furnish with the vital principle.—ns. V#x12B;′talism, the doctrine that there is a vital principle distinct from the organisation of living bodies, which directs all their actions and functions; Vī′talist, one who holds this doctrine.—adj. Vītalis′tic.—n. Vītal′ity, quality of being vital: principle or power of life: capacity to endure and flourish.—adv. Vī′tally.—n.pl. Vī′tals, the interior organs essential for life: the part of any whole necessary for its existence.—n. Vītā′tiveness (phrenol.), the love of life, a faculty assigned to a protuberance under the ear.—Vital force, the principle of life in animals and plants; Vital functions, power, ability to continue living; Vital principle, that principle on which the life of an organism is thought to depend; Vital statistics, a division of statistics dealing with the facts and problems concerning population. [L. vitalisvita, life—vivĕre, to live; cog. with Gr. bios, life.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ignition coil

Ignition coil

An ignition coil (also called a spark coil) is an induction coil in an automobile's ignition system that transforms the battery's low voltage to the thousands of volts needed to create an electric spark in the spark plugs to ignite the fuel. Some coils have an internal resistor, while others rely on a resistor wire or an external resistor to limit the current flowing into the coil from the car's 12-volt supply. The wire that goes from the ignition coil to the distributor and the high voltage wires that go from the distributor to each of the spark plugs are called spark plug wires or high tension leads. Originally, every ignition coil system required mechanical contact breaker points and a capacitor (condenser). More recent electronic ignition systems use a power transistor to provide pulses to the ignition coil. A modern passenger automobile may use one ignition coil for each engine cylinder (or pair of cylinders), eliminating fault-prone spark plug cables and a distributor to route the high voltage pulses. Ignition systems are not required for diesel engines which rely on compression to ignite the fuel/air mixture.

— Wikipedia

Spark gap

Spark gap

A spark gap consists of an arrangement of two conducting electrodes separated by a gap usually filled with a gas such as air, designed to allow an electric spark to pass between the conductors. When the voltage difference between the conductors exceeds the gap's breakdown voltage, a spark forms, ionizing the gas and drastically reducing its electrical resistance. An electric current then flows until the path of ionized gas is broken or the current reduces below a minimum value called the "holding current". This usually happens when the voltage drops, but in some cases occurs when the heated gas rises, stretching out and then breaking the filament of ionized gas. Usually, the action of ionizing the gas is violent and disruptive, often leading to sound, light and heat. Spark gaps were used historically in early electrical equipment, such as spark gap radio transmitters, electrostatic machines, and x-ray machines. Their most widespread use today is in spark plugs to ignite the fuel in internal combustion engines, but they are also used in lightning arrestors and other devices to protect electrical equipment from high-voltage transients.

— Freebase

Ignition coil

Ignition coil

An ignition coil is an induction coil in an automobile's ignition system which transforms the battery's low voltage to the thousands of volts needed to create an electric spark in the spark plugs to ignite the fuel. Some coils have an internal resistor while others rely on a resistor wire or an external resistor to limit the current flowing into the coil from the car's 12 volt supply. The wire that goes from the ignition coil to the distributor and the high voltage wires that go from the distributor to each of the spark plugs are called spark plug wires or high tension leads. Originally, every ignition coil system required mechanical contact breaker points, and a capacitor. More recent electronic ignition systems use a power transistor to provide pulses to the ignition coil. A modern passenger automobile may use one ignition coil for each engine cylinder, eliminating fault-prone spark plug cables and a distributor to route the high voltage pulses. Ignition systems are not required for diesel engines which rely on compression to ignite the fuel/air mixture.

— Freebase

diesel

diesel

For a spark-ignition internal combustion engine to continue running after the electrical current to the spark plugs has been turned off. This occurs when there's enough heat in the combustion chamber to ignite the air/fuel without a spark, the same way heat and pressure cause ignition in a diesel engine.

— Wiktionary

Vital statistics

Vital statistics

Vital statistics are statistics on live births, deaths, fetal deaths, marriages and divorces. The most common way of collecting information on these events is through civil registration, an administrative system used by governments to record vital events which occur in their populations. Efforts to improve the quality of vital statistics will therefore be closely related to the development of civil registration systems in countries. Box 1. United Nations Definitions of Vital Statistics and Civil Registration Systems A vital statistics system is defined by the United Nations “as the total process of collecting information by civil registration or enumeration on the frequency or occurrence of specified and defined vital events, as well as relevant characteristics of the events themselves and the person or persons concerned, and compiling, processing, analyzing, evaluating, presenting, and disseminating these data in statistical form”. Civil registration, as defined by the United Nations, is the” continuous, permanent, compulsory, and universal recording of the occurrence and characteristics of vital events and other civil status events pertaining to the population as provided by decree, law or regulation, in accordance with the legal requirements in each country.”

— Freebase

Spark

Spark

spärk, n. a small ignited particle shot off from a burning body: any small shining body or light: a small portion of anything active or vivid: a gay sprightly person, a lover, a beau.—v.i. to emit sparks: to play the gallant.—adj. Spark′ish, gay, jaunty, showy. [A.S. spearca, a spark; Dut. spark.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vitalism

Vitalism

Vitalism is the doctrine, often advocated in the past but now rejected by mainstream science, that "living organisms are fundamentally different from non-living entities because they contain some non-physical element or are governed by different principles than are inanimate things". Where vitalism explicitly invokes a vital principle, that element is often referred to as the "vital spark", "energy" or "élan vital", which some equate with the soul. Vitalism has a long history in medical philosophies: most traditional healing practices posited that disease results from some imbalance in vital forces. In the Western tradition founded by Hippocrates, these vital forces were associated with the four temperaments and humours; Eastern traditions posited an imbalance or blocking of qi.

— Freebase

Engine knocking

Engine knocking

Knocking (also knock, detonation, spark knock, pinging or pinking) in spark ignition internal combustion engines occurs when combustion of some of the air/fuel mixture in the cylinder does not result from propagation of the flame front ignited by the spark plug, but one or more pockets of air/fuel mixture explode outside the envelope of the normal combustion front. The fuel-air charge is meant to be ignited by the spark plug only, and at a precise point in the piston's stroke. Knock occurs when the peak of the combustion process no longer occurs at the optimum moment for the four-stroke cycle. The shock wave creates the characteristic metallic "pinging" sound, and cylinder pressure increases dramatically. Effects of engine knocking range from inconsequential to completely destructive. Knocking should not be confused with pre-ignition—they are two separate events. However, pre-ignition can be followed by knocking. The phenomenon of detonation was first observed and described by Harry Ricardo during experiments carried out between 1916 and 1919 to discover the reason for failures in aircraft engines.

— Wikipedia

Dieseling

Dieseling

Dieseling or engine run-on is a condition that can occur in spark plug, gasoline powered internal combustion engines, whereby the engine keeps running for a short period after being turned off, due to fuel igniting without a spark. Dieseling is so-named because it is similar in appearance to how diesel engines operate: by firing without a spark. The ignition source in a diesel is the compression of the fuel in the cylinder, rather than a spark as in gasoline engines. The dieseling phenomenon occurs not because the compression ratio is sufficient to cause auto-ignition of the fuel, but a hot spot inside the cylinder starts combustion. An automobile engine that is dieseling will typically sputter, then gradually stop. Dieseling is not nearly as common as it once was, because it most commonly occurs in engines equipped with carburetors. The vast majority of vehicles manufactured after 1990 are fuel-injected: The injectors and high-pressure fuel pump immediately cease supplying fuel to the cylinders when the ignition is switched off. If the injector is damaged or malfunctioning, a small amount of fuel can enter the chamber and be ignited, causing a sputter or two after the engine is switched off.

— Freebase

Élan vital

Élan vital

Élan vital was coined by French philosopher Henri Bergson in his 1907 book Creative Evolution, in which he addresses the question of self-organisation and spontaneous morphogenesis of things in an increasingly complex manner. Elan vital was translated in the English edition as "vital impetus", but is usually translated by his detractors as "vital force". It is a hypothetical explanation for evolution and development of organisms, which Bergson linked closely with consciousness. It was believed by others that this essence could be harvested and embedded into an inanimate substance and activated with electricity, perhaps taking literally another of Bergson's metaphorical descriptions, the "current of life". The British biologist Julian Huxley remarked that Bergson’s élan vital is no better an explanation of life than is explaining the operation of a railway engine by its élan locomotif. The same epistemological fallacy is parodied in Molière's Le Malade imaginaire, where a quack "answers" the question of "Why does opium cause sleep?" with "Because of its soporific power." Huxley happily used the term élan vital in a more metaphorical sense, as may be seen from the following excerpt:

— Freebase

Vital capacity

Vital capacity

Vital capacity is the maximum amount of air a person can expel from the lungs after a maximum inhalation. It is equal to the sum of inspiratory reserve volume, tidal volume, and expiratory reserve volume. A person's vital capacity can be measured by a wet or regular spirometer. In combination with other physiological measurements, the vital capacity can help make a diagnosis of underlying lung disease. A normal adult has a vital capacity between 3 and 5 litres. A human's vital capacity depends on age, sex, height, weight, and ethnicity. Lung volumes and lung capacities refer to the volume of air associated with different phases of the respiratory cycle. Lung volumes are directly measured, whereas lung capacities are inferred from volumes.

— Freebase

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "grievous"?
  • A. baleful
  • B. afflictive
  • C. deplorable
  • D. trifling