Synonyms containing wear out ones welcome

We've found 23,500 synonyms:

Wear

Wear

wār, v.t. to carry on the body: to have the appearance of: to consume by use, time, or exposure: to waste by rubbing: to do by degrees: to exhaust, efface: (naut.) to veer.—v.i. to be wasted by use or time: to be spent tediously: to consume slowly: to last under use: (Shak.) to be in fashion, to become accustomed: (naut.) to come round away from the wind: (obs.) to become:—pa.t. wōre; pa.p. wōrn.—n. act of wearing: lessening or injury by use or friction: article worn.—adj. Wear′able, fit to be worn.—n. Wear′er.—p.adj. Wear′ing, made or designed for wear: consuming, exhausting.—n. the process of wasting by attrition or time: that which is worn, clothes.—ns. Wear′ing-appar′el, dress; Wear′-ī′ron, a friction-guard.—Wear and tear, loss by wear or use; Wear away, to impair, consume; Wear off, to rub off by friction: to diminish by decay: to pass away by degrees; Wear out, to impair by use: to render useless by decay: to consume tediously: to harass. [A.S. werian, to wear; Ice. verja, to cover, Goth. wasjan.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Welcome Wagon

Welcome Wagon

Welcome Wagon is a business in the United States that contacts new homeowners after relocation, providing them with coupons and advertisements from local businesses. The company's full name is Welcome Wagon International, Inc. The company was founded in 1928, by Thomas Briggs in Memphis, Tennessee. Briggs later established the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation in 1957. When the company was founded, Welcome Wagon "hostesses" would visit new homeowners with a gift basket containing samples, coupons, and advertising from contributing businesses. These home visits continued for over 50 years until 1998, when then-owner Cendant laid off the "hostesses", saying that changing demographics meant few homeowners would be at home when representatives called. Welcome Wagon Canada, a separate company, continues to offer home visits. It also operates events for people planning a wedding or expecting a baby. Welcome Wagon in Canada was founded in 1930 and was run for many years by Pauline Hill, who first became a Hostess in 1953 and advanced to be head of the company as CEO. Welcome Wagon Ltd. became a wholly Canadian-owned entity in 1979 when a group of Canadian managers purchased it outright from the US owners. Currently, Welcome Wagon Ltd. is being led by its CEO, Pat Neuman and its head office is situated in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Hostesses are now known as representatives.

— Freebase

Who What Wear

Who What Wear

Who What Wear is the definitive authority for trend-setting fashionistas and their followers between the ages of 18-34 - this multi-media brand has quickly become the essential resource among tastemakers everywhere and is beloved by numerous stylish celebrities appealing to all young women with its approachable take on fashion, celebrity and style.Who What Wear reaches its audience through its online magazine and a daily email newsletter covering the latest in celebrity fashion, runway trends and beauty secrets. The WWW content also includes online video and books - Who What Wear TV was the #1 downloaded podcast on iTunes within the fashion vertical during its entire 4 season run, and the books, Who What Wear: Celebrity and Runway Style for Real Life, and What to Wear, Where, have received rave reviews. Who What Wear has expanded its business by launching Who What Wear Beauty, covering the latest beauty products, newest hair and makeup trends and tips.WhoWhatWear.com is published by Clique Media, Inc., which was co-founded by two former ELLE magazine editors Katherine Power and Hillary Kerr in 2006. They have written two books: Who What Wear: Celebrity and Runway Style for Real Life (2009) and What to Wear, Where: The How-to Handbook for Any Style Situation (2011).

— CrunchBase

Formal wear

Formal wear

Formal wear, formal attire or full dress is the traditional Western dress code category applicable for the most formal occasions, such as weddings, christenings, confirmations, funerals, Easter and Christmas traditions, in addition to certain state dinners, audiences, balls, and horse racing events. Formal wear is traditionally divided into formal day and evening wear; implying morning dress (morning coat) before 6 p.m., and white tie (dress coat) after 6 p.m. Generally permitted other alternatives, though, are the most formal versions of ceremonial dresses (including court dresses, diplomatic uniforms and academic dresses), full dress uniforms, religious clothing, national costumes, and most rarely frock coats (which preceded morning coat as default formal day wear 1820s-1920s). In addition, formal wear is often instructed to be worn with official full size orders and medals. The protocol indicating particularly men's traditional formal wear has remained virtually unchanged since the early 20th century. Despite decline following the counterculture of the 1960s, it remains observed in formal settings influenced by Western culture: notably around Europe, the Americas, South Africa, Australia, as well as Japan. For women, although fundamental customs for formal ball gowns (and wedding gowns) likewise apply, changes in fashion have been more dynamic. Traditional formal headgear for men is the top hat, and for women picture hats etc. of a range of interpretations. Shoes for men are dress shoes, dress boots or pumps and for women heeled dress pumps. Other accessories such as gloves for men and evening gloves for women may be worn. Formal wear being the most formal dress code, it is followed by semi-formal wear, equivalently based around daytime black lounge suit, and evening black tie (dinner suit/tuxedo), and evening gown for women. The male lounge suit and female cocktail dress in turn only comes after this level, traditionally associated with informal attire. Notably, if a level of flexibility is indicated (for example "uniform, morning coat or lounge suit", such as seen to the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in 2018), the hosts tend to wear the most formal interpretation of that dress code in order to save guests the inconvenience of out-dressing. Since the most formal versions of national costumes are typically permitted as supplementary alternatives to the uniformity of Western formal dress codes, conversely, since most cultures have at least intuitively applied some equivalent level of formality, the versatile framework of Western formal dress codes open to amalgation of international and local customs have influenced its competitiveness as international standard. From these social conventions derive in turn also the variants worn on related occasions of varying solemnity, such as formal political, diplomatic, and academic events, in addition to certain parties including award ceremonies, balls, fraternal orders, high school proms, etc.

— Wikipedia

Out

Out

owt, adv. without, not within: gone forth: abroad: to the full stretch or extent: in a state of discovery, development, &c.: in a state of exhaustion, extinction, &c.: away from the mark: completely: at or to an end: to others, as to hire out: freely: forcibly: at a loss: unsheltered: uncovered.—prep. forth from: outside of: exterior: outlying, remote.—n. one who is out, esp. of office—opp. to In: leave to go out, an outing.—v.i. to go or come out.—interj. away! begone!—n. Out′-and-out′er, a thoroughgoer, a first-rate fellow.—adjs. Out′-of-door, open-air; Out-of-the-way′, uncommon: singular: secluded.—Out and away, by far; Out and out, thoroughly: completely—also as adj. thorough, complete; Out-at-elbows, worn-out, threadbare; Out of character, unbecoming: improper; Out of course, out of order; Out of date, unfashionable: not now in use; Out of favour, disliked; Out of hand, instantly; Out of joint, not in proper connection: disjointed; Out of one's mind, mad; Out of pocket, having spent more than one has received; Out of print, not to be had for sale, said of books, &c.; Out of sorts, or temper, unhappy: cross-tempered; Out of the common, unusual, pre-eminent; Out of the question, that cannot be at all considered; Out of time, too soon or too late: not keeping time in music; Out with, away with: (Scot.) outside of: say, do, &c., at once. [A.S. úte, út; Goth. ut, Ger. aus, Sans. ud.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wear

Wear

In materials science, wear is erosion or sideways displacement of material from its "derivative" and original position on a solid surface performed by the action of another surface. Wear is related to interactions between surfaces and more specifically the removal and deformation of material on a surface as a result of mechanical action of the opposite surface. The need for relative motion between two surfaces and initial mechanical contact between asperities is an important distinction between mechanical wear compared to other processes with similar outcomes. The definition of wear may include loss of dimension from plastic deformation if it is originated at the interface between two sliding surfaces. However, plastic deformation such as yield stress is excluded from the wear definition if it doesn't incorporates a relative sliding motion and contact against another surface despite the possibility for material removal, because it then lacks the relative sliding action of another surface. Impact wear is in reality a short sliding motion where two solid bodies interact at an exceptional short time interval. Previously due to the fast execution, the contact found in impact wear was referred to as an impulse contact by the nomenclature. Impulse can be described as a mathematical model of a synthesised average on the energy transport between two travelling solids in opposite converging contact. Cavitation wear is a form of wear where the erosive medium or counter-body is a fluid. Corrosion may be included in wear phenomenons, but the damage is amplified and performed by chemical reactions rather than mechanical action.

— Freebase

Kalimavkion

Kalimavkion

A Kalimavkion, or kalymmavchi, or kamilavka, is an item of clerical clothing worn by Orthodox Christian and Eastern Catholic monks or awarded to clergy. The kalimavkion is a stiff cylindrical head covering, similar to a stovepipe hat but without a brim. The kalimavkion is worn during services; at other times, the softer skufia is worn in its place. The specific shape and colouring will differ between the various ethnic traditions: ⁕In the Greek tradition, monks wear a simple black kalimavkion, covered by a black veil, but ordained clergy wear a kalimavkion with a flattened conical brim at the top. Hierodeacons remove the veil when they vest for services, but hieromonks do not. In the Greek tradition, nuns do not normally wear a kalimavkion, but rather just the veil. ⁕In the Russian tradition, priests and deacons, if awarded it, wear a kamilavka that is normally taller than the Greek style, widens as it rises, and is flat at the top. Monks wear a black kamilavka with black veil. Russian nuns also wear the kamilavka with veil. Hieromonks and hierodeacons wear the same black kamilavka and veil as non-ordained monastics. Again, hierodeacons remove the veil when they are serving, but hieromonks do not. Protodeacons are awarded a purple or red kamilavka, but Archdeacons continue to wear the black kamilavka. Archpriests are also awarded a purple or red kamilavka. Bishops, who are always monks, wear a black kamilavka with a black veil. Archbishops are distinguished by a jewelled cross on the front of their veil. Metropolitans wear a white veil over their kamilavka, with the same cross as an archbishop. The Patriarch of Moscow instead of the kamilavka wears a white koukoulion, a conical head covering with a monastic veil.

— Freebase

EVICTED

EVICTED

If someone is evicted from the place where they are living, they are forced to leave it, usually because they have broken a law or contract. to legally force someone to leave the house they are living in, usually because they have not paid their rent; evict someone from something: expel or eject without recourse to legal process; to expel (a person, especially a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent.to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title.To put out by force:bump, dismiss, eject, expel, oust, throw out.Informal: chuck.Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear. expel, remove, turn out, put out, throw out, oust, kick out (informal), eject, dislodge, boot out (informal), force to leave, dispossess, chuck out (informal), show the door (to), turf out (informal), throw on to the streets; to force someone to leave somewhere; drive out, banish, send away.

— Editors Contribution

Casual

Casual

In the European tradition, casual is the dress code that emphasizes comfort and personal expression over presentation and uniformity. It is popular amongst casuals and hipsters. It includes a very wide variety of costume, so it is perhaps better defined by what it is not than what it is. The following are not considered casual wear: ⁕Ceremonial dress such as royal robes and full dress military costume ⁕Formal wear such as white tie and black tie ⁕Business professional wear such as suits and ties. Blue jeans and a T-shirt have been described as the "casual uniform". With the popularity of spectator sports in the late 20th century, a good deal of athletic gear has influenced casual wear. Clothing worn for manual labor also falls into casual wear. While utilitarian costume comes to mind first for casual dress, however, there is also a wide range of flamboyance and theatricality. Punk costume is a striking example. Madonna introduced a great deal of lace, jewelry, and cosmetics into casual wear during the 1980s. More recently, hip hop fashion has played up elaborate jewelry and luxurious materials worn in conjunction with athletic gear and the clothing of manual labor. Casual wear is typically the dress code in which new forms of gender expression are attempted before being accepted into semi-casual or semi-formal situations. An obvious example is masculine jewelry, which was once considered shocking or titillating even in casual circles, and is now hardly noteworthy in semi-formal situations. Amelia Bloomer introduced trousers for women as a casual alternative to formal hoops and skirts. In a recent mirror image, sarongs and other skirts have been embraced by a few men of the European tradition as a casual alternative to formal trousers. Both of these innovations caused great embarrassment in formal circles.

— Freebase

Wear and tear

Wear and tear

Wear and tear is damage that naturally and inevitably occurs as a result of normal wear or aging. It is used in a legal context for such areas as warranty contracts from manufacturers, which usually stipulate that damage due to wear and tear will not be covered. Wear and tear is a form of depreciation which is assumed to occur even when an item is used competently and with care and proper maintenance. For example, repeated impacts may cause stress to a hammer's head. In the normal use of a hammer for its designed task, this stress is impossible to prevent, and any attempt to eliminate it would make the hammer useless. At the same time, it is expected that the normal use of a hammer will not break it beyond repair until it has gone through a certain amount of use. The phenomenon of tear and wear is a good demonstration of the Second Law of Thermodynamics in action—roughly speaking, objects will get messier and more worn down over time, unless energy from the outside world is used to fix them. A company which supports a warranty on a product with the possibility of tear and wear will usually limit the warranty to a period of time where its tear and wear will probably not be enough to impede the use of the product significantly. Other factors such as the willingness of a customer to replace a product through warranty will affect how long the company offers it.

— Freebase

Yukata

Yukata

A yukata is a Japanese garment, a casual summer kimono usually made of cotton or synthetic fabric, and unlined. Yukata are worn by both men and women. Like other forms of traditional Japanese clothing, yukata are made with straight seams and wide sleeves. Men's yukata are distinguished by the shorter sleeve extension of approximately 10cm from the armpit seam, compared to the longer 20cm sleeve extension in women's yukata. A standard yukata ensemble consists of a cotton undergarment, yukata, obi, bare feet, sandals, a foldable or fixed hand fan, and a carry bag. Kinchaku are used by both men and women to carry cellphones, sunglasses, wallets and tissue. For men, an optional hat or derby may also be worn to protect the head from the sun. Yukata literally means bath clothes, although their use is not limited to after-bath wear. Yukata are a common sight in Japan during the hot summer months. Traditionally yukata were mostly made of indigo-dyed cotton but today a wide variety of colors and designs are available. As with kimono, the general rule with yukata is that younger people wear bright, vivid colors and bold patterns, while older people wear dark, matured colors and dull patterns. A child may wear a multicolored print and a young woman may wear a floral print, while an older woman would confine herself to a traditional dark blue with geometric patterns. Men in general may wear solid dark colors. Since the late 1990s, yukata have experienced a revival.

— Freebase

Taqiyah

Taqiyah

The taqiyah is a short, rounded cap. Some people do wear them for religious purposes but over the years Topi evolved into various variants and now many people including some women wear Topi for traditional purpose only especially in Pakistan. In Punjab topi is common with Pagri without any religious significance. When worn by itself, the taqiyah can be any color. When worn under the keffiyah scarf, it is always white. Some Muslims wrap the turban around the cap. The turban is called an imama in Arabic. In the United States and Britain, many Muslim merchants sell the prayer cap under the name kufi. Muslims wear the taqiyah to emulate Muhammad. The companions of Muhammad were never seen without their heads being covered. In order to emulate their actions, some Muslims throughout the world wear a variety of taqiyat, fez hats, and other headgear. The taqiyah is also called a 'prayer cap' in English. Some Muslims wear the taqiyah during Jumu'ah prayers at the mosque, and during daily salat at home. For men, it is mustahabb, which means 'commendable' or 'seeking the love of God', to cover the head during prayer. Some Muslims use a prayer mat during praying. Muslim men might wear a taqiyah during weddings.

— Freebase

Oil burner

Oil burner

An oil burner is a heating device which burns #1, #2 and #6 heating oils, diesel fuel or other similar fuels. In the United States ultra low #2 diesel is the common fuel used. It is dyed red to show that it is road-tax exempt. In most markets of the United States heating oil is the same specification of fuel as on-road un-dyed diesel. An oil burner is a part attached to an oil furnace, water heater, or boiler. It provides the ignition of heating oil/biodiesel fuel used to heat either air or water via a heat exchanger. The fuel is atomized into a fine spray usually by forcing it under pressure through a nozzle which gives the resulting flame a specific flow rate, angle of spray and pattern (variations of a cone shape). This spray is usually ignited by an electric spark with the air being forced through around it at the end of a blast tube, by a fan driven by the oil burner motor. The fuel pump is typically driven via a coupling connecting its shaft to that of the motor's. Oil burners also include combustion-proving devices to prevent out-of-control combustion - Primary Control; Safety Control; Cad Cell Control; Master Control; Fire-Eye Control are all common names for the 'combustion safety control'. In the United States residential home heating oil market the "vaporizing gun burner" is the most common mechanical device used to heat a home or small commercial forced air space with. Depending on the manufacturer these simple burners will see a lifespan if regularly maintained for decades. Currently, old installations from the 1950s and 1960s are still in operation today if they received regular maintenance. The maintenance involved in a gun burner usually is a replacement of the nozzle used to atomize the fuel, replacing the filter located at the air handler, replacing the fuel filter on the heating oil system from the tank, cleaning out any soot or deposits in the heat exchanger of the furnace, and ensuring the system is in good working order, and also involves checking and adjusting the fuel-air mixture for efficiency with a combustion analyzer. If a heating oil burner runs out of oil it often must be primed to be restarted. Priming involves purging any air from the fuel lines so that a steady flow of oil can find its way to the burner. If an oil burner wears out it can usually be upgraded and replaced with a more efficient modern burner. If the heat exchanger wears out that requires a new furnace. Oil furnaces will last nearly forever if maintained regularly ensuring the heat exchanger is vacuumed out and cleaned. Oil burners deposit soot in the heat exchanger which is an un-even insulator. The heat distribution in the heat exchanger is un-even, causing wear on this critical steel part causing an eventual cracking. Annual or every other year tune-ups guarantee this wear is far reduced. Oil furnace lifespans of fifty to seventy-five years with regular service are not uncommon compared to an average wear out of natural gas furnaces every twenty years.

— Wikipedia

to veer

to veer

To let out, to pay out, to turn or change. Also, to veer or wear, in contradistinction from tacking. In tacking it is a necessary condition that the ship be brought up to the wind as close-hauled, and put round against the wind on the opposite tack. But in veering or wearing, especially when strong gales render it dangerous, unseamanlike, or impossible, the head of the vessel is put away from the wind, and turned round 20 points of the compass instead of 12, and, without strain or danger, is brought to the wind on the opposite tack. Many deep-thinking seamen, and Lords St. Vincent, Exmouth, and Sir E. Owen, issued orders to wear instead of tacking, when not inconvenient, deeming the accidents and wear and tear of tacking, detrimental to the sails, spars, and rigging.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Oxinium

Oxinium

Oxinium is the brand name of a material used for replacement joints manufactured by the reconstructive orthopedic surgery division of medical devices company Smith & Nephew. It consists of a zirconium alloy metal substrate that transitions into a ceramic zirconium oxide outer surface. The ceramic surface is extremely abrasion resistant compared to traditional metal implant materials such as cobalt chromium. It also has a lower coefficient of friction against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), the typical counterface material used in total joint replacements. These two factors likely contribute to the significantly lower UHMWPE wear rates observed in simulator testing. Reducing UHMWPE wear is thought to decrease the risk of implant failure due to osteolysis. All-ceramic materials can have a similar effect on reducing wear, but are brittle and difficult to manufacture. The metal substrate of Oxinium implants makes components easier to manufacture and gives them greater toughness (a combination of strength and ductility). In essence, this technology combines the abrasion resistance and low friction of a ceramic with the workability and toughness of a metal.This combination of properties led to Oxinium technology being the first ever implant-related technology to win the prestigious ASM International Engineering Materials Achievement Award (EMAA) in 2005.Current competitive reduced-wear options in total hip arthroplasty (THA) are ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and metal-on-cross-linked polyethylene. The only competitive reduced-wear option for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is metal-on-cross-linked polyethylene. In September 2003, Smith & Nephew recalled its Macrotextured Oxinium Profix and Genesis II knee implants because of reports that 30 people receiving the implants without bone cement had to undergo a replacement surgery after they became loose.

— Wikipedia

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!