Synonyms containing wear out ones welcome Page #11

We've found 23,680 synonyms:

Ballet shoe

Ballet shoe

A ballet shoe, or ballet slipper, is a lightweight shoe designed specifically for ballet dancing. It may be made from soft leather, canvas, or satin, and has flexible, thin soles. Traditionally, women wear pink shoes and men wear white or black shoes. Tan colored slippers—which are unobtrusive and thus give the appearance of dancing barefoot—are worn in modern ballets and sometimes modern dancing by both men and women. Most ballet dancers wear soft ballet slippers for the main part of the ballet class. More advanced female dancers may change into point shoes for centre work and performance. Ballet shoes must fit very closely to the foot, for safety and to retain maximum flexibility.

— Freebase

Uskoks

Uskoks

The Uskoks (Croatian: Uskoci, pronounced [ǔsko̞t͡si], singular: Uskok; names in other languages) were irregular soldiers in Habsburg Croatia that inhabited areas on the eastern Adriatic coast and surrounding territories during the Ottoman wars in Europe. Etymologically, the word uskoci itself means "the ones who jumped in" ("the ones who ambushed" or "the ones who lent a hand") in Croatian. Bands of Uskoks fought a guerrilla war against the Ottomans, and they formed small units and rowed swift boats. Since the uskoks were checked on land and were rarely paid their annual subsidy, they resorted to acts of piracy. The exploits of the Uskoks contributed to a renewal of war between Venice and the Ottoman Empire (1571–1573). An extremely curious picture of contemporary manners is presented by the Venetian agents, whose reports on this war resemble a knightly chronicle of the Middle Ages. These chronicles contain information pertaining to single combats, tournaments and other chivalrous adventures. Many of these troops served abroad. After a series of incidents that escalated into the Uskok War (1615–1618), the Uskok activity in their stronghold of Senj mostly ceased.

— Wikipedia

bullets

bullets

Are projectiles of lead to be discharged from various kinds of small-arms. The first bullets used were round, and were designated by the number weighing one pound. The sizes employed were very large. Until quite recently the round ball still held its place with rifles and smooth-bores. Various devices were used for making it take the grooves of the rifle,—a guard-patch being among the best. (See Small-arms.) It was with this that the early settlers of America won their reputation as marksmen. Robins, in 1742, showed the superiority of the conical form, but it was not till about 1840 that round balls were generally discarded. The conical bullet was often used in grooves with an increasing twist, and gave wonderfully accurate results at short range. For long ranges, long bullets are necessary, and these require uniform twists, which are now generally used in military arms. Various forms of the elongated bullets were used. Most of these bullets had an expansive base, either hollow or plugged with wood; the design being to force the soft lead outward, so as to cause it to fit the grooves of the rifle, and thus give the bullet a rotation around its long axis during the motion forward. (See Small-arms.) This rotation, as is well known, increases the range and precision. Bullets were formerly cast, but now they are more frequently stamped in steel dies, and, as in breech-loading arms, the bullet takes the grooves by compression; the exploding base is omitted. The form of bullet now used in military arms is the cylindrical conoidal. The tendency recently has been to reduce the caliber. (See Projectiles.) Copper bullets are used by the Circassians. Bullets of stone were used in 1514; iron ones are mentioned in the Fœdera, 1550, and leaden ones were made before the close of the 16th century.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

strategos

strategos

(invented by Lieut. C. A. L. Totten, 4th U. S. Artillery). The American “game of war,” which takes its name from the Greek word strategos, the title of an Athenian general officer, derived in turn from stratos, “an army,” and ago, “I lead;” the secondary meaning of this term being a board or council of ten Athenians chosen annually to conduct the war department at home. The game of strategos is divided into six separate ones, or studies, of gradually increasing importance, and is far more comprehensive than the foreign war games, which have little in common with the subaltern and the student, and are so complicated as to excite interest only among the most profound and advanced scholars of military science. The six parts of strategos are: (1) The “minor tactical game,” which embraces all the details of the tactics of each of the three arms. (2) “Grand tactics,” embracing the topographical and strategical game, for the general elucidation of the grand principles of this branch of military science. (3) The “historical game,” for the study of historical battles and campaigns. (4) “Text-book illustration.” (5) A “battle game,” based upon military principles and precepts, which is calculated to instruct as well as interest without fatiguing that large class of students whose patience would not stand the close application required in a more advanced game. (6) The “advanced game,” which affords to the professional military student every opportunity for pursuing studies commenced in more elementary fields to their legitimate termination. It is only in the “advanced game” that strategos solves the same problem attempted by the Germans in kriegspiel, and other military nations in various alterations and improvements upon the great original. War games are by no means of such modern invention as may at first appear; chess is a very ancient “battle game,” and checkers one in which decisive concentration plays a most important part. During the last century two games, the jeu de la guerre and the jeu de la fortification, appeared in France and were played with cards. These games differ, however, entirely from the modern ones. Kriegspiel, the father of modern war games, was the invention of a civilian, Herr von Reitwitz, the details of which his son, a Prussian artillery officer, carefully improved. It rapidly grew into military favor, and since 1824, when it was first mentioned by officers of note, has undergone many modifications except as to its underlying principles. Von Moltke himself some twenty years ago was the president of a society whose special object was to play this game, and the great skill of Prussian officers and their success in their late wars is in no small degree to be attributed to this game, familiarity with which has become a sort of necessary step in advancement in the Prussian army. The American game possesses all the valuable features of kriegspiel, and some noticeable improvements thereon as to method, men, tables, etc., while it possesses the peculiar advantages of having elementary games of special interest to all classes of military men. The cost of this game is about $50.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Psalms, The Book of

Psalms, The Book of

the name given in the Septuagint to a collection of sacred songs in the Hebrew Bible, which are all of a lyrical character, and appear to have been at first collected for liturgical purposes. Their range is co-extensive with nearly all divine truth, and there are tones in them in accord with the experience and feelings of devout men in all ages. Nay, "the Psalter alone," says Ruskin, "which practically was the service-book of the Church for many ages, contains, merely in the first half of it, the sum of personal and social wisdom,... while the 48th, 72nd, and 75th have in them the law and the prophecy of all righteous government, and every real triumph of natural science is anticipated in the 104th." The collection bears the name of David, but it is clear the great body of them are of later date as well as of divers authorship, although it is often difficult to determine by whom some of them were written, and when. The determination of this, however, is of the less consequence, as the question is more a speculative one than a spiritual one, and whatever may be the result of inquiry in this matter now going on, the spiritual value of the Psalms, which is their real value, is nowise affected thereby. It matters nothing who wrote them or when they were written; they are there, are conceived from situations such as are obvious enough and common to the lot of all good men, and they bear on spiritual interests, which are our primary ones, and these, still, as in every other time, the alone really pressing ones. They express the real experiences of living men, who lay under an inner necessity to utter such a song, relieving themselves by the effort and ministering a means of relief to others in a like situation of soul.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Dash

Dash

to erase by a stroke; to strike out; knock out; -- with out; as, to dash out a word

— Webster Dictionary

Ferret

Ferret

to drive or hunt out of a lurking place, as a ferret does the cony; to search out by patient and sagacious efforts; -- often used with out; as, to ferret out a secret

— Webster Dictionary

Map

Map

to represent by a map; -- often with out; as, to survey and map, or map out, a county. Hence, figuratively: To represent or indicate systematically and clearly; to sketch; to plan; as, to map, or map out, a journey; to map out business

— Webster Dictionary

Maenad

Maenad

In Greek mythology, maenads were the female followers of Dionysus, the most significant members of the Thiasus, the god's retinue. Their name literally translates as "raving ones". Often the maenads were portrayed as inspired by Dionysus into a state of ecstatic frenzy, through a combination of dancing and drunken intoxication. In this state, they would lose all self-control, begin shouting excitedly, engage in uncontrolled sexual behavior, and ritualistically hunt down and tear to pieces animals—and, at least in myth, sometimes men and children—devouring the raw flesh. During these rites, the maenads would dress in fawn skins and carry a thyrsus, a long stick wrapped in ivy or vine leaves and tipped by a cluster of leaves; they would weave ivy-wreaths around their heads or wear a bull helmet in honor of their god, and often handle or wear snakes. German philologist Walter Friedrich Otto writes that The maddened Hellenic women of real life were mythologized as the mad women who were nurses of Dionysus in Nysa: Lycurgus "chased the Nurses of the frenzied Dionysus through the holy hills of Nysa, and the sacred implements dropped to the ground from the hands of one and all, as the murderous Lycurgus struck them down with his ox-goad." They went into the mountains at night and practised strange rites.

— Freebase

Wait

Wait

wāt, v.i. to stay in expectation (with for): to remain: to attend (with on): to follow: to lie in ambush.—v.t. to stay for: to await: (coll.) to defer: (obs.) to accompany.—n. ambush, now used only in such phrases as 'to lie in wait,' 'to lay wait:' the: act of waiting or expecting: delay: (pl.) itinerant musicians, originally watchmen, who welcome-in Christmas.—ns. Wait′er, one who waits: an attending servant: a salver or tray: a custom-house officer: (obs.) a watchman; Wait′erage, service; Wait′ering, the employment of a waiter; Wait′ing, act of waiting: attendance.—adv. Wait′ingly.—ns. Wait′ing-maid, -wom′an, a female attendant; Wait′ing-room, a room for the convenience of persons waiting; Wait′ing-vass′al (Shak.), an attendant; Wait′ress, a female waiter.—Wait attendance (Shak.), to remain in attendance; Wait upon, on, to call upon, visit: to accompany, to be in the service of: (B.) to look toward, to attend to, do the bidding of.—Lie in wait, to be in hiding ready for attack or surprise.—Lords, or Grooms, in waiting, certain officers in the Lord Chamberlain's department of the royal household; Minority waiter, a waiter out of employment, as a political minority is out of office. [O. Fr. waiter (Fr. guetter), to watch, attend—waite, a sentinel—Old High Ger. wahta (Ger. wacht), a watchman; cog. with A.S. wacan, to watch.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Watch

Watch

woch, n. act of looking out: close observation: guard: one who watches or those who watch: a sentry: a pocket timepiece: the place where a guard is kept: a division of the night: time of watching, esp. in a ship, a division of a ship's crew into two or three sections, so that one set of men may have charge of the vessel while the others rest. (The day and night are divided into watches of four hours each, except the period from 4 to 8 P.M., which is divided into two dog-watches of two hours' duration each).—v.i. to look with attention: to keep guard: to look out: to attend the sick by night: to inspect, keep guard over (with over).—v.t. to keep in view: to give heed to: to have in keeping: to guard: to wait for, detect by lying in wait: (Shak.) to keep from sleep.—ns. Watch′-bill, a list of the officers and crew of a ship, as divided into watches, with their several stations; Watch′-box, a sentry-box; Watch′case, the outer case of a watch: (Shak.) a sentry-box; Watch′-clock, a watchman's clock; Watch′-dog, a dog kept to guard premises and property; Watch′er, one who watches; Watch′-fire, a night-fire acting as a signal: a fire for the use of a watching-party, sentinels, scouts, &c.—adj. Watch′ful, careful to watch or observe: attentive: circumspect: cautious.—adv. Watch′fully.—ns. Watch′fulness; Watch′-glass, a sand-glass: the glass covering of the face of a watch; Watch′-guard, a watch-chain of any material; Watch′-gun, a gun fired at the changing of the watch, as on a ship; Watch′-house, a house in which a guard is placed: a lock-up, detaining office; Watch′-jew′el, a jewel used in the works of a watch for lessening friction; Watch′-key, a key for winding a watch; Watch′-light, a light used for watching or sitting up in the night; Watch′-māk′er, one who makes and repairs watches; Watch′-māk′ing; Watch′man, a man who watches or guards, esp. the streets of a city at night; Watch′-meet′ing, a religious meeting to welcome in the New Year, held on the night before, called the Watch′-night; Watch′-off′icer, the officer in charge of the ship during a watch, also called Officer of the watch; Watch′-pā′per, a round piece of paper, often decorated, put inside the outer case of a watch to prevent rubbing; Watch′-pock′et, a small pocket for holding a watch; Watch′-spring, the mainspring of a watch; Watch′-tow′er, a tower on which a sentinel is placed to watch or keep guard against the approach of an enemy; Watch′word, the password to be given to a watch or sentry: any signal: a maxim, rallying-cry.—Watch and ward, the old custom of watching by night and by day in towns and cities: uninterrupted vigilance.—The Black Watch, the 42d and 73d Regiments, now the 1st and 2d Battalions of the Black Watch or Royal Hig

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

spend

spend

to exhaust, to wear out

— Wiktionary

runner

runner

A person (from one or the other team) who runs out onto the field during the game to take verbal instructions from the coach to the players. A runner mustn't interfere with play, and may have to wear an identifying shirt to make clear his or her purpose on the field.

— Wiktionary

fray

fray

To cause exhaustion, wear out (a person's mental strength).

— Wiktionary

decrepit

decrepit

Weakened or worn out from age or wear

— Wiktionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. pernicious
  • B. deathly
  • C. lethal
  • D. deific