Synonyms containing wear out ones welcome Page #1,567

We've found 23,691 synonyms:

bogue out

bogue out

To become bogus, suddenly and unexpectedly. “His talk was relatively sane until somebody asked him a trick question; then he bogued out and did nothing but flame afterwards.” See also bogosity, bogus.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

bottom up implementation

bottom up implementation

Hackish opposite of the techspeak term top-down design. It has been received wisdom in most programming cultures that it is best to design from higher levels of abstraction down to lower, specifying sequences of action in increasing detail until you get to actual code. Hackers often find (especially in exploratory designs that cannot be closely specified in advance) that it works best to build things in the opposite order, by writing and testing a clean set of primitive operations and then knitting them together. Naively applied, this leads to hacked-together bottom-up implementations; a more sophisticated response is middle-out implementation, in which scratch code within primitives at the mid-level of the system is gradually replaced with a more polished version of the lowest level at the same time the structure above the midlevel is being built.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

breath of life packet

breath of life packet

[XEROX PARC] An Ethernet packet that contains bootstrap (see boot) code, periodically sent out from a working computer to infuse the ‘breath of life’ into any computer on the network that has happened to crash. Machines depending on such packets have sufficient hardware or firmware code to wait for (or request) such a packet during the reboot process. See also dickless workstation.The notional kiss-of-death packet, with a function complementary to that of a breath-of-life packet, is recommended for dealing with hosts that consume too many network resources. Though ‘kiss-of-death packet’ is usually used in jest, there is at least one documented instance of an Internet subnet with limited address-table slots in a gateway machine in which such packets were routinely used to compete for slots, rather like Christmas shoppers competing for scarce parking spaces.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

bug

bug

An unwanted and unintended property of a program or piece of hardware, esp. one that causes it to malfunction. Antonym of feature. Examples: “There's a bug in the editor: it writes things out backwards.” “The system crashed because of a hardware bug.” “Fred is a winner, but he has a few bugs” (i.e., Fred is a good guy, but he has a few personality problems).

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

burn a CD

burn a CD

To write a software or document distribution on a CDR. Coined from the fact that a laser is used to inscribe the information by burning small pits in the medium, and from the fact that disk comes out of the drive warm to the touch. Writable CDs can be done on a normal desk-top machine with a suitable drive (so there is no protracted release cycle associated with making them) but each one takes a long time to make, so they are not appropriate for volume production. Writable CDs are suitable for software backups and for short-turnaround-time low-volume software distribution, such as sending a beta release version to a few selected field test sites. Compare cut a tape.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

buzz

buzz

1. Of a program, to run with no indication of progress and perhaps without guarantee of ever finishing; esp. said of programs thought to be executing tight loops of code. A program that is buzzing appears to be catatonic, but never gets out of catatonia, while a buzzing loop may eventually end of its own accord. “The program buzzes for about 10 seconds trying to sort all the names into order.” See spin; see also grovel. 2. [ETA Systems] To test a wire or printed circuit trace for continuity, esp. by applying an AC rather than DC signal. Some wire faults will pass DC tests but fail an AC buzz test. 3. To process an array or list in sequence, doing the same thing to each element. “This loop buzzes through the tz array looking for a terminator type.”

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

can t happen

can t happen

The traditional program comment for code executed under a condition that should never be true, for example a file size computed as negative. Often, such a condition being true indicates data corruption or a faulty algorithm; it is almost always handled by emitting a fatal error message and terminating or crashing, since there is little else that can be done. Some case variant of “can't happen” is also often the text emitted if the ‘impossible’ error actually happens! Although “can't happen” events are genuinely infrequent in production code, programmers wise enough to check for them habitually are often surprised at how frequently they are triggered during development and how many headaches checking for them turns out to head off. See also firewall code (sense 2).

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

cascade

cascade

1. A huge volume of spurious error-message output produced by a compiler with poor error recovery. Too frequently, one trivial syntax error (such as a missing ‘)’ or ‘}’) throws the parser out of synch so that much of the remaining program text is interpreted as garbaged or ill-formed. 2. A chain of Usenet followups, each adding some trivial variation or riposte to the text of the previous one, all of which is reproduced in the new message; an include war in which the object is to create a sort of communal graffito.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

channel op

channel op

[IRC] Someone who is endowed with privileges on a particular IRC channel; commonly abbreviated chanop or CHOP or just op (as of 2000 these short forms have almost crowded out the parent usage). These privileges include the right to kick users, to change various status bits, and to make others into CHOPs.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

chemist

chemist

[Cambridge] Someone who wastes computer time on number-crunching when you'd far rather the machine were doing something more productive, such as working out anagrams of your name or printing Snoopy calendars or running life patterns. May or may not refer to someone who actually studies chemistry.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Cinderella Book

Cinderella Book

[CMU] Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation, by John Hopcroft and Jeffrey Ullman, (Addison-Wesley, 1979). So called because the cover depicts a girl (putatively Cinderella) sitting in front of a Rube Goldberg device and holding a rope coming out of it. On the back cover, the device is in shambles after she has (inevitably) pulled on the rope. See also book titles.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

click of death

click of death

A syndrome of certain Iomega ZIP drives, named for the clicking noise that is caused by the malady. An affected drive will, after accepting a disk, will start making a clicking noise and refuse to eject the disk. A common solution for retrieving the disk is to insert the bent end of a paper clip into a small hole adjacent to the slot. “Clicked” disks are generally unusable after being retrieved from the drive.The clicking noise is caused by the drive's read/write head bumping against its movement stops when it fails to find track 0 on the disk, causing the head to become misaligned. This can happen when the drive has been subjected to a physical shock, or when the disk is exposed to an electromagnetic field, such as that of the CRT. Another common cause is when a package of disks is armed with an anti-theft strip at a store. When the clerk scans the product to disarm the strip, it can demagnetize the disks, wiping out track 0.There is evidence that the click of death is a communicable disease; a “clicked” disk can cause the read/write head of a "clean" drive to become misaligned. Iomega at first denied the existence of the click of death, but eventually offered to replace free of charge any drives affected by the condition.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

clone

clone

1. An exact duplicate: “Our product is a clone of their product.” Implies a legal reimplementation from documentation or by reverse-engineering. Also connotes lower price. 2. A shoddy, spurious copy: “Their product is a clone of our product.” 3. A blatant ripoff, most likely violating copyright, patent, or trade secret protections: “Your product is a clone of my product.” This use implies legal action is pending. 4. [obs] PC clone: a PC-BUS/ISA/EISA/PCI-compatible 80x86-based microcomputer (this use is sometimes spelled klone or PClone). These invariably have much more bang for the buck than the IBM archetypes they resemble. This term fell out of use in the 1990s; the class of machines it describes are now simply PCs or Intel machines. 5. [obs.] In the construction Unix clone: An OS designed to deliver a Unix-lookalike environment without Unix license fees, or with additional ‘mission-critical’ features such as support for real-time programming. Linux and the free BSDs killed off this product category and the term with it. 6. v. To make an exact copy of something. “Let me clone that” might mean “I want to borrow that paper so I can make a photocopy” or “Let me get a copy of that file before you mung it”.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

code monkey

code monkey

1. A person only capable of grinding out code, but unable to perform the higher-primate tasks of software architecture, analysis, and design. Mildly insulting. Often applied to the most junior people on a programming team. 2. Anyone who writes code for a living; a programmer. 3. A self-deprecating way of denying responsibility for a management decision, or of complaining about having to live with such decisions. As in “Don't ask me why we need to write a compiler in COBOL, I'm just a code monkey.”

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

code police

code police

[by analogy with George Orwell's ‘thought police’] A mythical team of Gestapo-like storm troopers that might burst into one's office and arrest one for violating programming style rules. May be used either seriously, to underline a claim that a particular style violation is dangerous, or ironically, to suggest that the practice under discussion is condemned mainly by anal-retentive weenies. “Dike out that goto or the code police will get you!” The ironic usage is perhaps more common.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. threadlike
  • B. thick
  • C. fibrous
  • D. thready