Synonyms containing wear out ones welcome Page #6

We've found 23,671 synonyms:

CW complex

CW complex

A collection of balls of various dimensions, with higher-dimensional ones mapped along their respective boundaries to lower-dimensional ones.

— Wiktionary

Fintushel-Stern knot

Fintushel-Stern knot

The three-tangle pretzel knot with two right-handed twists in its first tangle, three left-handed ones in its second, and seven left-handed ones in its third.

— Wiktionary

adfix

adfix

A type of affix, which is attached to the outside of a stem (an existing word), to form a new word. The adfix category branches into prefixes (ones which appear before the stem) and suffixes (ones which appear after the stem).

— Wiktionary

spur

spur

An apparatus fastened to the heel of a horseman, for goading the horse. It is much less used than formerly. All cavalry soldiers wear spurs; but their use, except in the heat of an actual charge, is discouraged as much as possible. In the days of chivalry, the use of the spur was limited to knights, and it was among the emblems of knighthood. To win his spurs, was for a young man to earn knighthood by gallant conduct. The degradation of a knight involved the hacking off of his spurs; and the serving before a knight of a pair of spurs on a dish, was a strong hint by his host that he had outstayed his welcome.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Ex-

Ex-

a prefix from the latin preposition, ex, akin to Gr. 'ex or 'ek signifying out of, out, proceeding from. Hence, in composition, it signifies out of, as, in exhale, exclude; off, from, or out. as in exscind; beyond, as, in excess, exceed, excel; and sometimes has a privative sense of without, as in exalbuminuos, exsanguinous. In some words, it intensifies the meaning; in others, it has little affect on the signification. It becomes ef- before f, as in effuse. The form e- occurs instead of ex- before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, and v, as in ebullient, emanate, enormous, etc. In words from the French it often appears as es-, sometimes as s- or e-; as, escape, scape, elite. Ex-, prefixed to names implying office, station, condition, denotes that the person formerly held the office, or is out of the office or condition now; as, ex-president, ex-governor, ex-mayor, ex-convict. The Greek form 'ex becomes ex in English, as in exarch; 'ek becomes ec, as in eccentric

— Webster Dictionary

From

From

out of the neighborhood of; lessening or losing proximity to; leaving behind; by reason of; out of; by aid of; -- used whenever departure, setting out, commencement of action, being, state, occurrence, etc., or procedure, emanation, absence, separation, etc., are to be expressed. It is construed with, and indicates, the point of space or time at which the action, state, etc., are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out of which anything proceeds; -- the aritithesis and correlative of to; as, it, is one hundred miles from Boston to Springfield; he took his sword from his side; light proceeds from the sun; separate the coarse wool from the fine; men have all sprung from Adam, and often go from good to bad, and from bad to worse; the merit of an action depends on the principle from which it proceeds; men judge of facts from personal knowledge, or from testimony

— Webster Dictionary

exhaust

exhaust

To drain, metaphorically; to use or expend wholly, or till the supply comes to an end; to deprive wholly of strength; to use up; to weary or tire out; to wear out; as, to exhaust one's strength, patience, or resources.

— Wiktionary

knock up

knock up

To exhaust; wear out; weary; beat; tire out; to fatigue until unable to do more.

— Wiktionary

Mat

Mat

A mat is a generic term for a piece of fabric or flat material, generally placed on a floor or other flat surface, which serves a range of purposes including: ⁕providing a regular or flat surface, such as a mousepad. ⁕protecting that which is beneath the mat, such as a place mat or the matting used in archival framing and preservation of documents and paintings. ⁕protecting that which is above the mat, such as a wrestling or gymnastics mat, or an anti-vibration mat. ⁕changing the state of that which passes above it, such as a doormat attracting dirt from shoes. In domestic settings: ⁕A doormat, more frequently spelled door-mat, is a flat, usually rectangular object placed immediately outside or inside the entrance to a house or other building, to allow people to easily scrub or wipe the soles of their shoes before entering. Doormats are usually made from tough, long-lasting material such as coir, palmyra fibres and stalks, nylon, rubber, cloth, or aluminium and other metals. Doormats may also be known as welcome mats, as their location at an entrance constitutes a "welcome" to visitors, and may therefore also bear some word, message or sign of greeting. This in turn has given rise to a subculture of cartoons featuring characters returning home to find a humorous message on the doormat. The lowly purpose for which doormats exist has also led to informal use of the term as a reference to people who behave timidly or passively when exploited by others.

— Freebase

Steven

Steven

Steven is a fictional character invented by the rock artist Alice Cooper. He appears on the albums Welcome to My Nightmare, Alice Cooper Goes to Hell, DaDa, Hey Stoopid, The Last Temptation, Dragontown, Along Came a Spider, and Welcome 2 My Nightmare.

— Freebase

Transition

Transition

Transition is an album of music by jazz saxophonist John Coltrane, recorded in 1965 but released posthumously only in 1970. As its title indicates, Transition was a bridge between classic quartet recordings like A Love Supreme and the more experimental works of Coltrane's last years. For some reason, Impulse! decided to alter the track listing of the original album on the CD edition, removing "Dear Lord" and replacing it with two pieces originally released on Kulu Sé Mama, both recorded on June 10: "Welcome" and "Vigil". However, the 2001 Japanese edition restored the original track listing. Coltrane's playing alternates between blues idioms and the free jazz that would dominate his final work. Of the four musicians on this album, pianist McCoy Tyner was still the most grounded in traditional jazz. Bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer Elvin Jones were finding new ways to approach their instruments, while Coltrane took the lead with a newfound musical freedom. Transition's title track is a fifteen-minute modified blues, whilst "Dear Lord" is a ballad featuring Roy Haynes substituting for Jones on drums. "Welcome," which replaces "Dear Lord" on the album's compact disc release, is a five-minute ballad with a theme pitched high in the tenor saxophone's altissimo register and making extensive use of multiphonics. The closing "Suite" is a twenty-minute performance, covering a variety of moods. Ultimately, "Vigil", which concludes the CD release of the album, is a fiery duet between Coltrane and Jones.

— Freebase

New Year's Eve

New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve, the last day of the year, is on December 31. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening social gatherings, where many people dance, eat, drink alcoholic beverages, and watch or light fireworks to mark the new year. Some people attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into January 1. The island nations of Kiribati and Samoa are the first to welcome the New Year while Honolulu, Hawaii is among the last places to welcome the New Year.

— Freebase

Candor

Candor

Candor is a town in Montgomery County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 840 at the 2010 census. Candor is the home of the North Carolina Peach Festival, which is held every year on the third Saturday of July. The town's welcome sign reads: Welcome to Candor. Peach Capital.

— Freebase

Welcome to Hell

Welcome to Hell

Welcome to Hell is the debut studio album by English heavy metal band Venom. It was released in December 1981, through Neat Records, at the culmination of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. The music of Welcome to Hell is often described as speed metal, but it had a great influence on the then-emerging thrash metal style, and crystallized the elements of what later became known as death metal and black metal. The sound of the album is very noisy and rough, perhaps in part because the band thought they were recording a demo when they recorded the album over a period of only three days.

— Freebase

The Harvest (2)

The Harvest (2)

"The Harvest" is the second episode of season one of the WB Television Network television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. It was written by executive producer Joss Whedon and directed by John T. Kretchmer. The episode originally aired in feature-length format alongside part one, "Welcome to the Hellmouth", on March 10, 1997, and attracted 3.4 million viewers. As such, and even though it is typically shown as two separate episodes in reruns, the action continues directly from the cliffhanger ending of "Welcome to the Hellmouth", as Buffy Summers struggles to save Jesse McNally's life.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following terms is an antonym of the term "pathologic"?
  • A. ghoulish
  • B. diseased
  • C. morbid
  • D. healthy