Synonyms containing wisdom-tooth

We've found 1,471 synonyms:

Tooth

Tooth

tōōth, n. one of the hard bodies in the mouth, attached to the skeleton, but not forming part of it, developed from the dermis or true skin, their function primarily the mastication of the food: the taste or palate, relish: anything tooth-like: a prong: one of the projections on a saw or wheel:—pl. Teeth.—v.t. to furnish with teeth: to cut into teeth.—ns. Tooth′ache, an ache or pain in a tooth; Tooth′-brush, a brush for cleaning the teeth; Tooth′-draw′er (Shak.), one whose business is to extract teeth with instruments, a dentist; Tooth′-draw′ing, the act of extracting a tooth: the practice of extracting teeth.—adjs. Toothed, having teeth: (bot.) having tooth-like projections on the edge, as a leaf; Tooth′ful, full of teeth.—n. a small drink of spirits, &c.—adj. Tooth′less, having no teeth.—ns. Tooth′-ornament, a Romanesque and Early Pointed moulding, consisting of a square four-leaved flower pointed in the centre; Tooth′pick, an instrument for picking out anything in the teeth; Tooth′-pow′der, a powder used with a tooth-brush for cleaning the teeth.—adj. Tooth′some, pleasant to the taste.—ns. Tooth′someness; Tooth′-wash, a liquid preparation for cleansing the teeth; Tooth′wort, a name for Lathræa squamaria, one of the insectivorous plants, as well as for Dentaria bulbifera, one of the Cruciferæ, common in England, also known as 'coral-wort' and 'tooth-violet.'—adj. Tooth′y, having teeth: toothsome: biting.—Tooth and nail, with all possible vigour and fury.—A sweet tooth, a relish for sweet things; In spite of one's teeth, In the teeth of, in defiance of opposition; Show one's teeth, to threaten, to show one's anger and power to injure; Throw, Cast, in one's teeth, to fling at one, as a taunt, or in challenge; To the teeth (Shak.), in open opposition or defiance. [A.S. tóth (pl. téth, also tóthas); cog. with Goth. tunthus, L. dens, dent-is, Gr. o-dous, o-dont-os, Sans. danta.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wisdom literature

Wisdom literature

Wisdom literature is a genre of literature common in the Ancient Near East. This genre is characterized by sayings of wisdom intended to teach about divinity and about virtue. The key principle of wisdom literature is that while techniques of traditional story-telling are used, books also presume to offer insight and wisdom about nature and reality. The most famous examples of wisdom literature are found in the Bible. The following Biblical books are classified as wisdom literature: ⁕Book of Job ⁕Psalms ⁕Proverbs ⁕Ecclesiastes ⁕Song of Songs ⁕Wisdom ⁕Sirach The genre of mirror-of-princes writings, which has a long history in Islamic and Western Renaissance literature, represents a secular cognate of biblical wisdom literature. In Classical Antiquity, the advice poetry of Hesiod, particularly his Works and Days has been seen as a like-genre to Near Eastern wisdom literature.

— Freebase

Pericoronitis

Pericoronitis

Pericoronitis, is inflammation of the soft tissues surrounding the crown of a partially erupted tooth, including the gingiva and the dental follicle. Most commonly pericoronitis occurs with a partially erupted or partially erupted and impacted mandibular third molar. Periocoronitis is a common dental problem, often occurring in young adults, since this is roughly the age when the wisdom teeth are erupting into the mouth . The soft tissue covering a partially erupted molar tooth is known as an operculum. Pericoronitis may occur for several reasons, usually involving an inflammatory response in the soft tissues because bacteria, food debris and plaque have accumulated beneath the operculum, an area which can be difficult to access with normal oral hygiene methods. An upper tooth may also start to bite into the soft tissues over a lower tooth and cause inflammation. The signs and symptoms of pericoronitis are variable. Chronic inflammation may cause few if any symptoms, whereas an acute episode of pericoronitis, often associated with the formation of a pericoronal abscess, can cause significant pain and swelling. Sometimes the infection can spread to other parts of the face or neck, and rarely the swelling can start to threaten the airway and the individual is treated in hospital. Food impaction causing periodontal pain and pulpitis secondary to dental caries are also possible causes of pain associated with a third molar. The treatment of acute pericoronitis is normally addressed first by cleaning the area underneath the operculum with an antiseptic solution, and with painkillers, regular hot salt water mouthwashes/mouthbaths and improved oral hygiene in the affected area. Once the acute symptoms are controlled, the underlying cause is assessed and a decision is made as to whether to remove or retain the affected tooth. Often this is related to whether the tooth will continue to grow into the mouth and reach a normal position, or whether it is stuck against another tooth, and to other factors such as the presence of decay or periodontal disease in the area. If the tooth is retained, it usually requires improved oral hygiene in the area thereafter to prevent another episode of acute pericoronitis.

— Freebase

Holy Wisdom

Holy Wisdom

Holy Wisdom (Greek: Ἁγία Σοφία, Latin: Sancta Sapientia, Russian: Святая София Премудрость Божия, romanized: Svyataya Sofiya Premudrost' Bozhiya "Holy Sophia, Divine Wisdom") is a concept in Christian theology. Christian theology received the Old Testament personification of Wisdom (Hebrew Chokhmah) as well as the concept of Wisdom (Sophia) from Greek philosophy, especially Platonism. In Christology, Christ the Logos as God the Son was identified with Divine Wisdom from earliest times. The identification of Holy Wisdom with God the Son remains particularly pronounced in Eastern Orthodoxy, while the Latin Rite has placed more emphasis of the identication of God the Son with the Logos. There has also been a minority position which identified Wisdom with the Holy Spirit instead. Furthermore, in mystical interpretations forwarded in Russian Orthodoxy, known as Sophiology, Holy Wisdom as a feminine principle came to be identified with the Theotokos (Mother of God) rather than with Christ himself. Similar interpretations were proposed in feminist theology as part of the "God and Gender" debate in the 1990s.

— Wikipedia

Tooth enamel

Tooth enamel

Tooth enamel, along with dentin, cementum, and dental pulp is one of the four major tissues that make up the tooth in lobe finned fish and tetrapods. It is the hardest and most highly mineralized substance in the human body. Tooth enamel is also found in the dermal denticles of sharks. It is the normally visible dental tissue of a tooth. It covers the anatomical crown and must be supported by underlying dentin. Enamel is 96% inorganic mineral, with water and organic material composing the rest. In humans, enamel varies in thickness over the surface of the tooth, often thickest at the cusp, up to 2.5 mm, and thinnest at its border with the cementum at the cementoenamel junction. The normal color of enamel varies from light yellow to grayish white. At the edges of teeth where there is no dentin underlying the enamel, the color sometimes has a slightly blue tone. Since enamel is semitranslucent, the color of dentin and any material underneath the enamel strongly affects the appearance of a tooth. The enamel on primary teeth has a more opaque crystalline form and thus appears whiter than on permanent teeth. Enamel's primary mineral is hydroxyapatite, which is a crystalline calcium phosphate. The large amount of mineral in enamel accounts not only for its strength but also for its brittleness. Tooth enamel ranks 5 on Mohs hardness scale and a Young's modulus of 83 GPa. Dentin, less mineralized and less brittle, 3–4 in hardness, compensates for enamel and is necessary as a support. On radiographs, the differences in the mineralization of different portions of the tooth and surrounding periodontium can be noted; enamel appears more radiopaque than either dentin and pulp since it is denser than both, both of which appear more radiolucent.

— Freebase

Sweet Tooth

Sweet Tooth

Sweet Tooth, real name Marcus "Needles" Kane, is a fictional character from the Twisted Metal video game series. Sweet Tooth is designed around the premise of a killer clown that drives a combat ice cream truck, and his face has been featured on the cover of every Twisted Metal game to date, making him the series mascot. While being in every title of the series, he has not always been immediately available, requiring to be unlocked in some. He is the only character, to drive more than one vehicle in any of the games, being the driver of Head-On's Dark Tooth, Tower Tooth, and as of Twisted Metal: Lost, Gold Tooth. Sweet Tooth has the most relationships to any group of characters in the entire series: his father Charlie Kane and Marcus Kane He is also Dark Tooth in the second game. Spectre's ending in the first game strongly hints that Sweet Tooth was the serial killer who killed the driver of Spectre five years before the competition.) He has an unnamed brother that only appeared in Twisted Metal: Black, who drove that game's Yellow Jacket vehicle.

— Freebase

Collective wisdom

Collective wisdom

Collective wisdom, also called group wisdom and co-intelligence, is shared knowledge arrived at by individuals and groups. Collective intelligence, which is sometimes used synonymously with collective wisdom, is more of a shared decision process than collective wisdom. Unlike collective wisdom, collective intelligence is not uniquely human, and has been associated with animal and plant life. Collective intelligence is basically consensus-driven decision making, whereas collective wisdom is not necessarily focused on the decision process. Collective wisdom is a more amorphous phenomenon which can be characterized by collective learning over time.

— Wikipedia

John Minor Wisdom

John Minor Wisdom

John Minor Wisdom, one of the "Fifth Circuit Four", and a liberal Republican from Louisiana, was a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit during the 1950s and 1960s, when that court became known for a series of decisions crucial in advancing the civil rights of African-Americans. At that time, the Fifth Circuit included not only Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas, but also Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and the Panama Canal Zone. Wisdom was born in New Orleans and graduated from the prestigious Isidore Newman School. In 1925, he received an A.B. degree from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. In 1929, he received an LL.B. from Tulane Law School. He was in the United States Army Lieutenant Colonel from 1942 to 1946. He was in private practice of law in New Orleans, Louisiana from 1929 to 1957. He was an Adjunct professor of law, Tulane University from 1938 to 1957. As a young man, Wisdom was a Democrat, but he left that party in reaction to what he perceived as the corrupt administration of Governor Huey Pierce Long, Jr. As the Republican National Committeeman from Louisiana, Wisdom was instrumental in securing the nomination of Dwight D. Eisenhower at the 1952 Republican National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. Wisdom was also credited for helping Eisenhower to win Louisiana in the 1956 general election, the first time Louisiana had voted Republican in 80 years. Eisenhower appointed Wisdom to the Fifth Circuit bench in 1957 in what was seen as a reward for his services. Wisdom was nominated by President Eisenhower on March 14, 1957, to a seat vacated by Wayne G. Borah. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 26, 1957, and received his commission on June 27, 1957.

— Freebase

Tooth fairy

Tooth fairy

The tooth fairy is a fantasy figure of early childhood. The folklore states that when a child loses a baby tooth, if he or she places it beneath the bed pillow, the tooth fairy will visit while the child sleeps, replacing the lost tooth with a small payment. The tradition of leaving a tooth under a pillow for the tooth fairy to collect is practiced in various countries in the Anglosphere. For an example of how some families in the United States observe tooth fairy customs, see this transcript of an episode of the radio show, This American Life.

— Freebase

Wisdom

Wisdom

wiz′dum, n. quality of being wise: judgment: right use of knowledge: learning: (B.) skilfulness, speculation, spiritual perception: the apocryphal Book of the Wisdom of Solomon (see Apocrypha).—n. Wis′dom-tooth, a large double back-tooth, so called because it appears late, when people are supposed to have arrived at the age of wisdom. [A.S. wísdóm, wisdom. Cf. Wise.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dog-tooth

Dog-tooth

In architecture, a dog-tooth or dogtooth pattern is an ornament found in the mouldings of medieval work of the commencement of the 12th century, which is thought to have been introduced by the Crusaders. The earliest example is found in the hall at Rabbath Ammon in Moab in Jordan (c. 614) built by the Sassanians, where it decorates the arch moulding of the blind arcades and the string courses. The pattern consists of four flower petals forming a square or diamond shape with central elements. The petals have the form of the pointed conical canine tooth, eye tooth or cuspid. In the apse of a church at Murano, near Venice, it is similarly employed. In the 12th and 13th centuries it was further elaborated with carving, losing therefore its primitive form, but constituting a most beautiful decorative feature. In Elgin Cathedral in Scotland, the dogtooth ornament in the archivolt becomes a four-lobed leaf, and in Stone church in Kent, a much more enriched type of flower. The term has been supposed to originate in a resemblance to the dog tooth violet, but the original idea of a projecting tooth is a sufficient explanation.

— Wikipedia

jigger

jigger

A device used by fishermen to set their nets under the ice of frozen lakes. It consists of a plank of wood with an arm on it with a sharp metal tooth on the end of the arm. A rope is tied to the arm which, when pulled, propels the plank along the underside of the ice because the tooth catches the ice. Releasing the rope allows the tooth to sink away from the ice, and when the rope is tightened again, the tooth grabs the ice farther along, allowing the jigger to crawl along the underside of the ice.

— Wiktionary

House of Wisdom

House of Wisdom

The House of Wisdom was a library, translation institute and research center established in Abbasid-era Baghdad, Iraq. It was a key institution in the Translation Movement and is considered to have been a major intellectual hub during the Islamic Golden Age. The House of Wisdom was founded by Caliph Harun al-Rashid and culminated under his son al-Ma'mun, who reigned from 813 to 833 and is credited with its institution. Al-Ma'mun is also credited with bringing many well-known scholars to share information ideas and culture in the House of Wisdom. Based in Baghdad from the 9th to 13th centuries, many of the most learned scholars, primarily of Persian or Christian background, were part of this research and educational institute. Besides translating books to Arabic and preserving them, scholars associated with the House of Wisdom also made many remarkable original contributions to diverse fields. During the reign of al-Ma'mun, observatories were set up, and the House was an unrivaled center for the study of humanities and for science in medieval Islam, including mathematics, astronomy, medicine, alchemy and chemistry, zoology and geography and cartography. Drawing on Indian, Greek, and Persian texts, the scholars accumulated a great collection of world knowledge, and built on it through their own discoveries. By the middle of the ninth century, the House of Wisdom was the largest repository of books in the world.

— Freebase

Wisdom tooth

Wisdom tooth

A wisdom tooth, in humans, is any of the usual four third molars. Wisdom teeth usually appear between the ages of 16 and 25. Most adults have four wisdom teeth, but it is possible to have fewer or more, in which case the extras are called supernumerary teeth. Wisdom teeth commonly affect other teeth as they develop, becoming impacted or "coming in sideways." They are often extracted when this occurs.

— Freebase

Gary Wright

Gary Wright

Gary Malcolm Wright (born April 26, 1943) is an American singer, songwriter, musician, and composer best known for his 1976 hit songs "Dream Weaver" and "Love Is Alive", and for his role in helping establish the synthesizer as a leading instrument in rock and pop music. Wright's breakthrough album, The Dream Weaver (1975), came after he had spent seven years in London as, alternately, a member of the British heavy rock band Spooky Tooth and a solo artist on A&M Records. While in England, he played keyboards on former Beatle George Harrison's triple album All Things Must Pass (1970), so beginning a friendship that inspired the Indian religious themes and spirituality inherent in Wright's subsequent songwriting. His work since the late 1980s has embraced world music and the new age genre, although none of his post-1976 releases has matched the popularity of The Dream Weaver. A former child actor, Wright performed on Broadway in the hit musical Fanny before studying medicine and then psychology in New York and Berlin. After meeting Chris Blackwell of Island Records in Europe, Wright moved to London, where he helped establish Spooky Tooth as a popular live act. He also served as the band's principal songwriter on their recordings – among them, the well-regarded albums Spooky Two (1969) and You Broke My Heart So I Busted Your Jaw (1973). His solo album Footprint (1971), recorded with contributions from Harrison, coincided with the formation of Wright's short-lived band Wonderwheel, which included guitarist Mick Jones. Also during the early 1970s, Wright played on notable recordings by B.B. King, Jerry Lee Lewis, Ringo Starr, Harry Nilsson and Ronnie Spector, while his musical association with Harrison endured until shortly before the latter's death in 2001. Wright turned to film soundtrack work in the early 1980s, which led to him re-recording his most popular song, "Dream Weaver", for the 1992 comedy Wayne's World. Following Spooky Tooth's reunion tour in 2004, Wright has performed live frequently, either as a member of Starr's All-Starr Band, with his own live band, or on subsequent Spooky Tooth reunions. Wright's most recent solo albums, including Waiting to Catch the Light (2008) and Connected (2010), have all been issued on his Larklio record label. In 2014, Jeremy P. Tarcher published his autobiography, titled Dream Weaver: Music, Meditation, and My Friendship with George Harrison.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. genetic
  • B. maladaptive
  • C. transmissible
  • D. hereditary