Synonyms containing x-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

We've found 6,698 synonyms:

Survivin

Survivin

Survivin, also called baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing 5 or BIRC5, is a protein that, in humans, is encoded by the BIRC5 gene. NCBI Reference Sequence: NG_029069.1 Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family. The survivin protein functions to inhibit caspase activation, thereby leading to negative regulation of apoptosis or programmed cell death. This has been shown by disruption of survivin induction pathways leading to increase in apoptosis and decrease in tumour growth. The survivin protein is expressed highly in most human tumours and fetal tissue, but is completely absent in terminally differentiated cells. These data suggest survivin might provide a new target for cancer therapy that would discrimnate between transformed and normal cells. Survivin expression is also highly regulated by the cell cycle and is only expressed in the G2-M phase. It is known that survivin localizes to the mitotic spindle by interaction with tubulin during mitosis and may play a contributing role in regulating mitosis. The molecular mechanisms of survivin regulation are still not well understood, but regulation of survivin seems to be linked to the p53 protein. It also is a direct target gene of the Wnt pathway and is upregulated by beta-catenin.

— Freebase

Phage display

Phage display

Phage display is a laboratory technique for the study of proteinprotein, protein–peptide, and protein–DNA interactions that uses bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to connect proteins with the genetic information that encodes them. In this technique, a gene encoding a protein of interest is inserted into a phage coat protein gene, causing the phage to "display" the protein on its outside while containing the gene for the protein on its inside, resulting in a connection between genotype and phenotype. These displaying phages can then be screened against other proteins, peptides or DNA sequences, in order to detect interaction between the displayed protein and those other molecules. In this way, large libraries of proteins can be screened and amplified in a process called in vitro selection, which is analogous to natural selection. The most common bacteriophages used in phage display are M13 and fd filamentous phage, though T4, T7, and λ phage have also been used.

— Wikipedia

FANCE

FANCE

Fanconi anemia, complementation group E protein is a protein that in humans is encoded by the FANCE gene. The Fanconi anemia complementation group (FANC) currently includes FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1 (also called BRCA2), FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, and FANCL. Fanconi anemia is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder characterized by cytogenetic instability, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, increased chromosomal breakage, and defective DNA repair. The members of the Fanconi anemia complementation group do not share sequence similarity; they are related by their assembly into a common nuclear protein complex. This gene encodes the protein for complementation groufcrp E.A nuclear complex containing FANCE protein (as well as FANCC, FANCF and FANCG) is essential for the activation of the FANCD2 protein to the mono-ubiquitinated isoform. In normal, non-mutant cells, FANCD2 is mono-ubiquinated in response to DNA damage. FANCE together with FANCC acts as the substrate adapter for this reaction Activated FANCD2 protein co-localizes with BRCA1 (breast cancer susceptibility protein) at ionizing radiation-induced foci and in synaptonemal complexes of meiotic chromosomes. Activated FANCD2 protein may function prior to the initiation of meiotic recombination, perhaps to prepare chromosomes for synapses, or to regulate subsequent recombination events.

— Wikipedia

Apoptosis

Apoptosis

Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death that may occur in multicellular organisms. Biochemical events lead to characteristic cell changes and death. These changes include blebbing, cell shrinkage, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and chromosomal DNA fragmentation. In contrast to necrosis, which is a form of traumatic cell death that results from acute cellular injury, apoptosis generally confers advantages during an organism's life cycle. For example, the differentiation of fingers and toes in a developing human embryo occurs because cells between the fingers apoptose; the result is that the digits are separate. Unlike necrosis, apoptosis produces cell fragments called apoptotic bodies that phagocytic cells are able to engulf and quickly remove before the contents of the cell can spill out onto surrounding cells and cause damage. Between 50 and 70 billion cells die each day due to apoptosis in the average human adult. For an average child between the ages of 8 and 14, approximately 20 billion to 30 billion cells die a day. Research in and around apoptosis has increased substantially since the early 1990s. In addition to its importance as a biological phenomenon, defective apoptotic processes have been implicated in an extensive variety of diseases. Excessive apoptosis causes atrophy, whereas an insufficient amount results in uncontrolled cell proliferation, such as cancer.

— Freebase

Hsp90

Hsp90

Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) is a chaperone protein that assists other proteins to fold properly, stabilizes proteins against heat stress, and aids in protein degradation. It also stabilizes a number of proteins required for tumor growth, which is why Hsp90 inhibitors are investigated as anti-cancer drugs. Heat shock proteins, as a class, are among the most highly expressed cellular proteins across all species. As their name implies, heat shock proteins protect cells when stressed by elevated temperatures. They account for 1–2% of total protein in unstressed cells. However, when cells are heated, the fraction of heat shock proteins increases to 4–6% of cellular proteins.Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is one of the most common of the heat-related proteins. The "90" comes from the fact that it weighs roughly 90 kiloDaltons. A 90 kDa protein is considered fairly large for a non-fibrous protein. Hsp90 is found in bacteria and all branches of eukarya, but it is apparently absent in archaea. Whereas cytoplasmic Hsp90 is essential for viability under all conditions in eukaryotes, the bacterial homologue HtpG is dispensable under non-heat stress conditions.This protein was first isolated by extracting proteins from cells stressed by heating, dehydrating or by other means, all of which caused the cell’s proteins to begin to denature. However it was later discovered that Hsp90 also has essential functions in unstressed cells.

— Wikipedia

Granzyme

Granzyme

Granzymes are serine proteases that are released by cytoplasmic granules within cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells. Their purpose is to induce apoptosis within virus-infected cells, thus destroying them. Cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells release a protein called perforin, which attacks the target cells. Researchers used to think that perforin creates pores within the cell membranes, through which the granzymes can enter, inducing apoptosis. However, new evidence indicates that a multimeric complex can enter a cell through the mannose 6-phosphate receptor and is enclosed in a vesicle. Not mentioned in reference Perforin then allows GrB to pass through the vesicle surface and into the cell, causing apoptosis by various pathways. They do so by cleaving caspases, which in turn activates caspase-activated DNase. This enzyme degrades DNA, thus inducing apoptotic cascades. Also, GrB cleaves the protein Bid, which recruits the protein Bax and Bak to change the membrane permeability of the mitochondria, causing the release of cytochrome c, Smac/Diablo and Omi/HtrA2, among other proteins. As well, GrB is shown to cleave many of the chemicals responsible for apoptosis without the aid of caspase, as proven by experiments on caspase knockout mice CTL cells incubated with other cells.

— Freebase

Cephalostatin

Cephalostatin

The cephalostatins comprise a family of more than 30 trisdecacyclic bissteroidal pyrazines with extreme cytotoxicity against human tumors, isolated from the African marine worm Cephalodiscus gilchristi. The mechanism of action of these compounds remains unknown. Beside a steroidal platform, critical features implicated in the pharmacophore include a set of covalently linked polar and nonpolar domains and the spiroketals. It was shown that cephalostatin 1 induces a novel pathway of receptor-independent apoptosis that selectively uses Smac/DIABLO (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases/direct inhibitor of apoptosis-binding protein with a low isoelectric point) as a mitochondrial signaling molecule. Apoptosis was found to be dependent on caspase activity because the pan-caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone blocks cephalostatin 1-mediated DNA fragmentation. (NCI)

— Freebase

Mixed inhibition

Mixed inhibition

Mixed inhibition is a type of enzyme inhibition in which the inhibitor may bind to the enzyme whether or not the enzyme has already bound the substrate but has a greater affinity for one state or the other. It is called "mixed" because it can be seen as a conceptual "mixture" of competitive inhibition, in which the inhibitor can only bind the enzyme if the substrate has not already bound, and uncompetitive inhibition, in which the inhibitor can only bind the enzyme if the substrate has already bound. If the ability of the inhibitor to bind the enzyme is exactly the same whether or not the enzyme has already bound the substrate, it is known as a non-competitive inhibitor. Non-competitive inhibition is sometimes thought of as a special case of mixed inhibition. In mixed inhibition, the inhibitor binds to an allosteric site, i.e. a site different from the active site where the substrate binds. However, not all inhibitors that bind at allosteric sites are mixed inhibitors. Mixed inhibition may result in either a decrease in the apparent affinity of the enzyme for the substrate in cases where the inhibitor favors binding the free enzyme, or in an increase in the apparent affinity when the inhibitor binds favorably to the enzyme-substrate complex. In either case the inhibition decreases the apparent maximum enzyme reaction rate.

— Freebase

Aurintricarboxylic acid

Aurintricarboxylic acid

Aurintricarboxylic acid is a chemical compound that readily polymerizes in aqueous solution, forming a stable free radical that inhibits protein-nucleic acid interactions. It is a potent inhibitor of ribonuclease and topoisomerase II by preventing the binding of the nucleic acid to the enzyme. It stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation processes including the Jak2/STAT5 pathway in NB2 lymphoma cells, ErbB4 in neuroblastoma cells, and MAP kinases, Shc proteins, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase and phospholipase Cγ in PC12 cells. It also inhibits apoptosis. It prevents down-regulation of Ca2+-impermeable GluR2 receptors and inhibits calpain, a Ca2+-activated protease that is activated during apoptosis. It is used to inhibit protein biosynthesis in its initial stages. Nominally, it is used in biological experiments as a protein inhibitor, and as an ammonium salt it is used as a reagent to estimate the aluminium in water, biological tissue, and foods. It was found that ATA is a strong inhibitor of topoisomerases and other nucleases. It might be useful for increasing efficiency of RNA isolation. It has been discovered that using aurintricarboxylic acid against influenza-A post-infection has a strong protective effect by inhibiting the virus' ability to reproduce. In cultured canine kidney cells, it was found to reduce viral reproduction and infection when applied post-infection, but not when used as a 'vaccine'. It has also been shown to block the binding of the HIV coat molecule gp120 to the CD4 co-receptor on T cells through which it invades.

— Freebase

Structural genomics

Structural genomics

Structural genomics seeks to describe the 3-dimensional structure of every protein encoded by a given genome. This genome-based approach allows for a high-throughput method of structure determination by a combination of experimental and modeling approaches. The principal difference between structural genomics and traditional structural prediction is that structural genomics attempts to determine the structure of every protein encoded by the genome, rather than focusing on one particular protein. With full-genome sequences available, structure prediction can be done more quickly through a combination of experimental and modeling approaches, especially because the availability of large number of sequenced genomes and previously-solved protein structures allows scientists to model protein structure on the structures of previously solved homologs. Because protein structure is closely linked with protein function, the structural genomics has the potential to inform knowledge of protein function. In addition to elucidating protein functions, structural genomics can be used to identify novel protein folds and potential targets for drug discovery. Structural genomics involves taking a large number of approaches to structure determination, including experimental methods using genomic sequences or modeling-based approaches based on sequence or structural homology to a protein of known structure or based on chemical and physical principles for a protein with no homology to any known structure.

— Freebase

Apoptosis-inducing factor

Apoptosis-inducing factor

Apoptosis inducing factor is a flavoprotein. Apoptosis inducing factor is involved in initiating a caspase-independent pathway of apoptosis by causing DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. It also acts as an NADH oxidase. Another AIF function is to regulate the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane upon apoptosis. Normally it is found behind the outer membrane of the mitochondria and is therefore secluded from the nucleus. However, when the mitochondrion is damaged, it moves to the cytosol and to the nucleus. Inactivation of AIF leads to resistance of embryonic stem cells to death following the withdrawal of growth factors indicating that it is involved in apoptosis.

— Freebase

Canavalin

Canavalin

Canavalin is a plant protein found in the jack bean, sword bean, and related plants. It is the major storage protein found in these plants' seeds, and is one of four proteins readily isolated from the seeds; the others are concanavalin A, concanavalin B, and urease. Canavalin is a vicilin protein homologous to phaseolin.The crystallization of jack bean seed proteins has been studied extensively since the early 20th century and was of particular interest to 1946 Nobel Prize in Chemistry laureate James B. Sumner, though Sumner's group never fully characterized canavalin and it remained of little interest until its crystallization properties began to be studied in the 1970s. It was among the first reported examples of a protein whose tertiary structure contains two pseudo-symmetrical protein domains. Canavalin has since been used as a model system for studying protein crystallization, most notably in the study of protein crystal formation in space under microgravity conditions.

— Wikipedia

Caspase 7

Caspase 7

Caspase-7, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase, also known as CASP7, is a human protein encoded by the CASP7 gene. CASP7 orthologs have been identified in nearly all mammals for which complete genome data are available. Unique orthologs are also present in birds, lizards, lissamphibians, and teleosts. Caspase-7 is a member of the caspase family of proteins, and has been shown to be an executioner protein of apoptosis. Sequential activation of caspases plays a central role in the execution-phase of cell apoptosis. Caspases exist as inactive proenzymes that undergo proteolytic processing by upstream caspases at conserved aspartic residues to produce two subunits, large and small, that dimerize to form the active enzyme in the form of a heterotetramer. The precursor of this caspase is cleaved by caspase 3, caspase 10, and caspase 9. It is activated upon cell death stimuli and induces apoptosis. Alternative splicing results in four transcript variants, encoding three distinct isoforms.

— Freebase

Crystalloid

Crystalloid

one of the microscopic particles resembling crystals, consisting of protein matter, which occur in certain plant cells; -- called also protein crystal

— Webster Dictionary

Protein C

Protein C

Protein C, also known as autoprothrombin IIA and blood coagulation factor XIV, is a zymogenic protein, the activated form of which plays an important role in regulating blood clotting, inflammation, cell death, and maintaining the permeability of blood vessel walls in humans and other animals. Activated protein C performs these operations primarily by proteolytically inactivating proteins Factor Va and Factor VIIIa. APC is classified as a serine protease as it contains a residue of serine in its active site. In humans, protein C is encoded by the PROC gene, which is found on chromosome 2. The zymogenic form of protein C is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein that circulates in blood plasma. Its structure is that of a two-chain polypeptide consisting of a light chain and a heavy chain connected by a disulfide bond. The protein C zymogen is activated when it binds to thrombin, another protein heavily involved in coagulation, and protein C's activation is greatly promoted by the presence of thrombomodulin and endothelial protein C receptors. Because of EPCR's role, activated protein C is found primarily near endothelial cells, and it is these cells and leukocytes that APC affects. Because of the crucial role that protein C plays as an anticoagulant, those with deficiencies in protein C, or some kind of resistance to APC, suffer from a significantly increased risk of forming dangerous blood clots.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. deathly
  • B. pernicious
  • C. deific
  • D. lethal