What is another word for diffusion?

Synonyms for diffusion
dɪˈfyu ʒəndif·fu·sion

This thesaurus page includes all potential synonyms, words with the same meaning and similar terms for the word diffusion.

Princeton's WordNet0.0 / 0 votes

  1. diffusionnoun

    (physics) the process in which there is movement of a substance from an area of high concentration of that substance to an area of lower concentration

    Synonyms:
    dissemination, dispersal, dispersion

  2. diffusionnoun

    the spread of social institutions (and myths and skills) from one society to another

    Synonyms:
    dissemination, dispersal, dispersion

  3. dissemination, diffusionnoun

    the property of being diffused or dispersed

    Synonyms:
    airing, dissemination, public exposure, dispersal, dispersion, spreading

  4. dispersion, dispersal, dissemination, diffusionnoun

    the act of dispersing or diffusing something

    "the dispersion of the troops"; "the diffusion of knowledge"

    Synonyms:
    scattering, dispersion, dissemination, distribution, spreading, public exposure, airing, dispersal

Dictionary of English Synonymes0.0 / 0 votes

  1. diffusionnoun

    Synonyms:
    dispersion, spread, extension, propagation, circulation, distribution

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Words popularity by usage frequency

rankingword
#625release
#1219distribution
#1525mailing
#3125spread
#3856broadcast
#5890broadcasting
#6353outreach
#7142circulation
#8678spreading
#11203diffusion
#11266dissemination
#12605scattering
#14465dispersion
#20130disseminate
#23292disseminated
#27447airing
#28460dispersal
#30476disseminating

How to use diffusion in a sentence?

  1. Daniel J. Boorstin:

    Knowledge is not simply another commodity. On the contrary. Knowledge is never used up. It increases by diffusion and grows by dispersion.

  2. Jeff Navin:

    Some of the biggest national security questions facing the country run through Piketon and Kemmerer, a Post-Soviet dealAmerican reliance on foreign enriched uranium echoes its competitive disadvantages on microchips and the critical minerals used to make electric batteries — two essential components of the global energy transition.But in the case of uranium enrichment, United States once had an advantage and chose to give it up.In the 1950s, as the nuclear era began in earnest, Piketon became the site of one of two enormous enrichment facilities in the Ohio River Valley region, where a process called gaseous diffusion was used.Meanwhile, the Soviet Union developed centrifuges in a secret program, relying on a team of German physicists and engineers captured toward the end of World War II. Its centrifuges proved to be 20 times as energy efficient as gaseous diffusion. By the end of the Cold War, United States and Russia had roughly equal enrichment capacities, but huge differences in the cost of production.In 1993, Washington and Moscow signed an agreement, dubbed Megatons to Megawatts, in which United States purchased and imported much of Russia’s enormous glut of weapons-grade uranium, which United States then downgraded to use in power plants. This provided the U.S. with cheap fuel and Moscow with cash, and was seen as a de-escalatory gesture.But it also destroyed the profitability of America’s inefficient enrichment facilities, which were eventually shuttered. Then, instead of investing in upgraded centrifuges in United States, successive administrations kept buying from Russia.ImageA mural celebrates Piketon’s gaseous diffusion plant, long ago shuttered, and United States role in the local economy.Credit... Brian Kaiser for The New York TimesImageIn the lobby at Piketon plant, a miniature display of new centrifuges.Credit... Brian Kaiser for The New York TimesThe centrifuge plant in Piketon, operated by Centrus Energy, occupies a corner of the site of the old gaseous diffusion facility. Building United States to United States full potential would create thousands of jobs, according to Centrus Energy. And it could produce the kinds of enriched uranium needed in both current and new-age nuclear plants.Lacking Piketon’s output, plants like TerraPower’s would have to look to foreign producers, like France, that might be a more politically acceptable and reliable supplier than Russia, but would also be more expensive.TerraPower sees itself as integral to phasing out climate-warming fossil fuels in electricity. Its reactor would include a sodium-based battery that would allow the plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting fluctuations in wind or solar production elsewhere.It is part of the energy transition that coal-country senators like Mr. Manchin and John Barrasso, a Wyoming Republican, are keen to fix as they eye nuclear replacements for lost coal jobs and revenue. While Mr. Manchin in particular has complicated the Biden administration’s efforts to quicken the transition away from fossil fuels, he also pushed back against colleagues, mostly Democrats, who are skeptical of nuclear power’s role in that transition, partly because of the radioactive waste it creates.

  3. Sarah Fischer:

    People may not notice an assault taking place, or may not perceive it as an emergency, or may experience a diffusion of responsibility, since there are so many other people present.

  4. Khalid AbuLeif:

    With a concept like zero emissions and 'let's knock fossil fuels out of the picture', without clear technology diffusion and international cooperation program, you are really not helping the process.

  5. David Altman:

    There is a threat of contagion, of diffusion, of these authoritarian trends, it's a profound concern.


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"diffusion." Synonyms.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 17 May 2024. <https://www.synonyms.com/synonym/diffusion>.

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