Synonyms containing acquittance roll

We've found 1,412 synonyms:

Roll

Roll

rōl, v.i. to turn like a wheel: to turn on an axis: to be formed into a roll or cylinder: to move, as waves: to be tossed about: to move tumultuously: to be hurled: to rock, or move from side to side: to wallow: to spread under a roller: to sound as a drum beaten rapidly: to move onward.—v.t. to cause to roll: to turn on an axis: to wrap round on itself: to enwrap: to drive forward: to move upon wheels: to press or smooth with rollers: to beat rapidly, as a drum.—n. act of rolling: that which rolls: a revolving cylinder making sheets, plates, &c.: a roller: that which is rolled up—hence parchment, paper, &c. wound into a circular form: a document: a register: a kind of fancy bread: the continued sound of a drum, of thunder, &c.: a swagger or rolling gait.—adj. Roll′-about′, podgy.—ns. Roll′-call, the calling of the roll or list of names, as in the army; Roll′-cū′mūlus, a form of strato-cumulus cloud; Roll′er, that which rolls: a cylinder used for rolling, grinding, &c.: one of a family of Picarian birds: a long, broad bandage: (pl.) long heavy waves; Roll′er-skate, a skate mounted on wheels or rollers for use on asphalt or some other smooth surface.—adj. Roll′ing, modulating: moving on wheels: making a continuous sound.—ns. Roll′ing-mill, a place in which metal is made into sheets, bars, rails, or rods, by working it between pairs of rolls: a machine for rolling metal, &c., into any required form, or for crushing materials between rollers; Roll′ing-pin, a cylindrical piece of wood for rolling dough, paste, &c. to any required thickness; Roll′ing-press, a press of two cylinders for rolling or calendering cloth; Roll′ing-stock, the stock or store of locomotive-engines, carriages, &c. of a railway; Roll′way, an incline: a shoot.—Master of the Rolls, the head of the Record-office. [O. Fr. roler, roeler (Fr. rouler)—Low L. rotulāre—L. rotula, a little wheel—rota, a wheel.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Roll cage

Roll cage

A roll cage is a specially engineered and constructed frame built in the passenger compartment of a vehicle to protect its occupants from being injured in an accident, particularly in the event of a roll-over. There are many different roll cage designs depending on the application, hence different racing organizations have differing specifications and regulations. They also help to stiffen the chassis, which is desirable in racing applications. A roll bar is a single bar behind the driver that provides moderate roll-over protection. Due to the lack of a protective top, some modern convertibles utilize a strong windscreen frame acting as a roll bar. Also, a roll hoop may be placed behind both headrests, which is essentially a roll bar spanning the width of a passenger's shoulders. A newer form of rollover protection, pioneered on the Mercedes-Benz R129 in 1989, is deployable roll hoops that are normally hidden within the body of a car. When sensors detect an imminent rollover, the roll hoops quickly extend and lock in place. Cars that have a deployable rollover protection system include the Peugeot 307 CC, Volvo C70, Mercedes-Benz SL 500, and Jaguar XK.

— Freebase

Lobster roll

Lobster roll

A traditional lobster roll is a sandwich filled with lobster meat soaked in butter and served on a steamed hot dog bun or similar roll, so that the opening is on the top rather than on the side. There are variations of this sandwich made in other parts of New England, which may contain diced celery or scallion, and mayonnaise. The sandwich may also contain lettuce, lemon juice, salt and black pepper. Traditional New England restaurants serve lobster rolls with potato chips or french fries on the side. The lobster roll was first originated at a restaurant named Perry's, in Milford, Connecticut as early as 1929., according to John Mariani's, "Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink." Once Perry's put the new sandwich on its menu, its popularity spread up and down the Connecticut coast, but not far beyond. For those residing in Connecticut, a lobster roll served warm is simply called a "lobster roll" while the lobster roll served cold as it is throughout the rest of the northeast region and the world is called a "lobster salad roll" . The lobster salad roll took off on the Eastern End of Long Island, NY starting in 1965, pioneered by the Lobster Roll Restaurant The Lobster Roll.

— Freebase

Roll-off

Roll-off

Roll-off is the steepness of a transmission function with frequency, particularly in electrical network analysis, and most especially in connection with filter circuits in the transition between a passband and a stopband. It is most typically applied to the insertion loss of the network, but can, in principle, be applied to any relevant function of frequency, and any technology, not just electronics. It is usual to measure roll-off as a function of logarithmic frequency, consequently, the units of roll-off are either decibels per decade (dB/decade), where a decade is a 10-times increase in frequency, or decibels per octave (dB/8ve), where an octave is 2-times increase in frequency. The concept of roll-off stems from the fact that in many networks roll-off tends towards a constant gradient at frequencies well away from the cut-off point of the frequency curve. Roll-off enables the cut-off performance of such a filter network to be reduced to a single number. Note that roll-off can occur with decreasing frequency as well as increasing frequency, depending on the bandform of the filter being considered: for instance a low-pass filter will roll-off with increasing frequency, but a high-pass filter or the lower stopband of a band-pass filter will roll-off with decreasing frequency. For brevity, this article describes only low-pass filters. This is to be taken in the spirit of prototype filters; the same principles may be applied to high-pass filters by interchanging phrases such as "above cut-off frequency" and "below cut-off frequency".

— Wikipedia

Arctic roll

Arctic roll

An Arctic roll is a British dessert made of vanilla ice cream wrapped in a thin layer of sponge cake to form a roll, with a layer of raspberry flavoured sauce between the sponge and the ice cream. The dessert was invented in the 1950s by a Czech lawyer, Ernest Velden, who had emigrated to England in 1939. He set up a factory in Eastbourne producing Arctic Roll in 1958, and the dessert quickly became very popular. During the 1980s more than 25 miles of Birds Eye Arctic Roll were sold each month. However, sales slumped during the 1990s and eventually the manufacturer of Arctic Roll, Birds Eye, stopped producing the dessert. The 2008 economic downturn saw the reappearance of Arctic Roll as consumers increasingly looked for low-cost foods. While some consumers view the Arctic Roll as comfort food, others view it as old fashioned and the food writer Nigel Slater has even described it as tasting of "frozen carpet". Nonetheless, Birds Eye reported "overwhelming consumer demand" for the dessert. Indeed, from when Birds Eye started marketing Arctic Rolls again in December 2008 until April 2009, sales of the product were estimated at £3.5 million, or 3 million boxes. Commentators suggest that aside from Arctic Roll's low price, many consumers buy the dessert out of feelings of nostalgia. A number of UK supermarkets sell their own brand versions of Arctic Roll, both chocolate and raspberry variants, and did so even when Birds Eye were not marketing the product.

— Freebase

Dutch roll

Dutch roll

Dutch roll is a type of aircraft motion, consisting of an out-of-phase combination of "tail-wagging" and rocking from side to side. This yaw-roll coupling is one of the basic flight dynamic modes. This motion is normally well damped in most light aircraft, though some aircraft with well-damped Dutch roll modes can experience a degradation in damping, as airspeed decreases and altitude increases. Dutch roll stability can be artificially increased by the installation of a yaw damper. Wings placed well above the center of mass, sweepback and dihedral wings tend to increase the roll restoring force, and therefore increase the Dutch roll tendencies; this is why high-winged aircraft often are slightly anhedral, and transport-category swept-wing aircraft are equipped with yaw dampers. In aircraft design, Dutch roll results from relatively weaker positive directional stability as opposed to positive lateral stability. When an aircraft rolls around the longitudinal axis, a sideslip is introduced into the relative wind in the direction of the rolling motion. Strong lateral stability begins to restore the aircraft to level flight. At the same time, somewhat weaker directional stability attempts to correct the sideslip by aligning the aircraft with the perceived relative wind. Since directional stability is weaker than lateral stability for the particular aircraft, the restoring yaw motion lags significantly behind the restoring roll motion. As such, the aircraft passes through level flight as the yawing motion is continuing in the direction of the original roll. At that point, the sideslip is introduced in the opposite direction and the process is reversed.

— Freebase

Hoagie roll

Hoagie roll

A hoagie roll or hero roll is a type of long flat roll used to prepare hoagie sandwiches. Some hoagie roll dough is fermented prior to baking. Hoagie rolls are sometimes toasted before being used to prepare a sandwich.Ingredients used in hoagie roll preparation may include flour, egg, milk, vegetable oil, salt, sugar and yeast. Some versions include sesame seeds atop the roll, which may add extra flavor and textural elements. Gluten-free and vegan hoagie roll recipes have been devised. The hoagie roll is used to prepare the Philadelphia cheesesteak sandwich and various other submarine sandwiches.

— Wikipedia

roll-on/roll-off discharge facility

roll-on/roll-off discharge facility

Provides a means of disembarking vehicles from a roll-on and roll-off ship to lighterage. The roll-on/roll-off discharge facility consists of six causeway sections, nonpowered assembled into a platform that is two sections long and three sections wide. When use of landing craft, utility, as lighters, is being considered, a seventh

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Roll Call

Roll Call

Roll Call is a newspaper published in Washington, D.C., United States, from Monday to Friday when the United States Congress is in session and on Mondays only during recess. Roll Call reports news of legislative and political maneuverings on Capitol Hill, as well as political coverage of congressional elections across the country. In addition to breaking news, the paper features analysts such as Morton M. Kondracke, Stuart Rothenberg and David Hawkings. RollCall.com, the online version of the newspaper, features breaking news stories and daily e-mail alerts and award winning photojournalism. David Rapp currently serves as editor-in-chief. Founded in 1955 by Sid Yudain, a former press secretary to Congressman Al Morano, Roll Call is the flagship publication of CQ Roll Call, which also operates: Congressional Quarterly, a publisher of print and online daily and weekly news about Congress and politics. Roll Call merged with CQ in 2009 after the latter company was purchased by The Economist Group, Roll Call's parent company. Other members of The Economist Group include The Economist, European Voice, and Capitol Advantage. Every issue, 11,500 copies of Roll Call are delivered to Congress and 400 copies are delivered to the White House free of charge. The publication's motto is "The Newspaper of Capitol Hill Since 1955."

— Freebase

Tempering, Electric

Tempering, Electric

A process of tempering metals by electrically produced heat. The article is made part of an electric circuit. The current passing through it heats it, thereby tempering it. For wire the process can be made continuous. The wire is fed from one roll to another, and if required one roll may be immersed in a liquid bath or the wire between the rolls may be led therein. The current is brought to one roll and goes through the wire to the other. As it does this the wire is constantly fed from one roll to another. The bath may be used as described to cool it after the heating. The amount of heating may be regulated by the rate of motion of the wire.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Roll

Roll

to press or level with a roller; to spread or form with a roll, roller, or rollers; as, to roll a field; to roll paste; to roll steel rails, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Bump steer

Bump steer

Bump steer or roll steer is the term for the tendency of the wheel of a car to steer itself as it moves through the suspension stroke. It is typically measured in degrees of steer per metre of upwards motion or degrees per foot. On modern cars the front suspension and steering links are designed so that during a turning manoeuvre, body roll and suspension motions will not influence the car to turn more sharply than the driver anticipates. On modern cars, the leading edge of the front tyres move outwards as the suspension is compressed, and inwards as the suspension droops (extends). This is known as "toe out" under bump and results in roll understeer. I.e. during a turn, body roll will cause the outside suspension (relative to the curve) to compress and the inside suspension to droop (extend). Rear suspension can be designed a number of ways. Many modern vehicles have rear suspension designs which are opposite of the front suspension: Toe in under bump, and out under droop. They can also be designed to have very little or no bump steer at all. Cars with rear live axles, also known as solid axles do not exhibit true bump steer, but can still cause some steering over one wheel bumps, see § difference between bump steer and roll steer. If both wheels on a live axle move upwards by the same amount, they tend not to steer. Bump steer causes a vehicle to turn itself when one wheel hits a bump or falls down into a hole or rut. Excessive bump steer increases tire wear and makes the vehicle more difficult to handle on rough roads. For example, if the front left wheel rolls over a bump it will compress the suspension on that corner and automatically rotate to the left (toe out), causing the car to turn itself left momentarily without any input from the steering wheel. Another example, is that when most vehicles become airborne their front wheels will noticeably toe in. Typical values are from two to ten degrees per metre, for the front wheels. The linearity of the bump steer curve is important and relies on the relationship of the control arms and tie rod pickup points, and the length of each part. As the suspension goes through bump and droop, each part follows an arc resulting in a change of effective length. Whichever parts are longest tend to have less change in effective length because their arc radius is longer. This is the determining factor in designed bump steer. Another factor that affects bump steer is bushing compliance and deflection and arm bending. During a turn, if some or all of the bushings deflect then their pickup points have changed If any of the arms and tie rods bend then their effective length will change resulting in a change of toe. Roll steer is an important part of the budget used to define a vehicle's understeer, known as a Bundorf analysis.

— Wikipedia

Roll On

Roll On

Roll On is the second album by Australian rock band The Living End, released in Australia and New Zealand on EMI in 2000, and internationally on Reprise/Warner Brothers in 2001. Musically, the album marked a change from the sound of their debut album, The Living End. Roll On had a notably more polished sound. Horn sections featured on numerous songs, such as Uncle Harry and Killing The Right. Whereas the previous album had displayed punk and rockabilly influences, Roll On showed more Australian rock influences, particularly artists of the 80s Pub Rock era. The album even garnered comparison, by a few critics, to seminal punk band The Clash's creative breakthrough, London Calling. The album was recorded with producer Nick Launay, who had previously worked with artists such as Silverchair and Midnight Oil. It also marked the last major work featuring drummer Travis Demsey. In the downtime following the album's release and subsequent tour, he would leave the band, to be replaced by Andy Strachan. ARIA publicised that Roll On had officially achieved 2x Platinum status in Australia in November 2007. This was a great achievement as all of their other album releases were simultaneously awarded a higher accreditation. These new figures, however, indicated that sales of Roll On had been topped by the band's fourth studio release, State Of Emergency. This now means that the Roll On album now takes the position as the band's third most successful release.

— Freebase

Roll film

Roll film

Rollfilm or roll film is any type of spool-wound photographic film protected from white light exposure by a paper backing, as opposed to film which is protected from exposure and wound forward in a cartridge. Confusingly, roll film was originally often referred to as "cartridge" film because of its resemblance to a shotgun cartridge. The opaque backing paper allows roll film to be loaded in daylight. It is typically printed with frame number markings which can be viewed through a small red window at the rear of the camera. A spool of roll film is usually loaded on one side of the camera and pulled across to an identical take up spool on the other side of the shutter as exposures are made. When the roll is fully exposed, the take up spool is removed for processing and the empty spool on which the film was originally wound is moved to the other side, becoming the take up spool for the next roll of film.

— Freebase

Crosspicking

Crosspicking

Crosspicking is a technique for playing the mandolin or guitar using a plectrum or flatpick in a rolling, syncopated style across three strings. This style is probably best known as one element of the flatpicking style in bluegrass music, and it closely resembles a banjo roll, the main difference being that the banjo roll is fingerpicked rather than flatpicked. A typical element of the technique is the use of three pitches played repeatedly within a four-pulse rhythm. This results in a continual shifting of the pitches vis-a-vis the accented pulse. The three pitches are usually played on three adjacent strings—one per string. The pick direction can vary, depending on the required emphasis and the melody. Crosspicking is a guitar style that uses a flatpick to imitate the sound of fingerpicking. It is used both as a lead style and as accompaniment. Using repeating patterns involving two or three strings, crosspicking is particularly effective at slow to mid-tempos...The basic [patterns are] forward and reverse "roll[s]"...played in the standard alternating picking pattern (dudududu) or in specialized patterns (dduddudd) or (uuduuduu). Using "D" for down" and "U" for "up" (and slashes to indicate groups of three), mandolin player Jesse McReynolds used a crosspicking roll of D - U - U / D - U - U / D - U . . .creating a repeating pattern of notes that expresses the melody. Guitarist George Shuffler used a pick pattern of D - D - U / D - D - U / D - D . . . .The traditional banjo roll form is D - D - U / D - D - U / D - D . . .this helps to accentuate the "threes" nature of the pattern against the "four" rhythm. The other way is using strict alternate picking:

— Wikipedia

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