Synonyms containing application configuration access protocol

We've found 9,402 synonyms:

NETCONF

NETCONF

The Network Configuration Protocol (NETCONF) is a network management protocol developed and standardized by the IETF. It was developed in the NETCONF working group and published in December 2006 as RFC 4741 and later revised in June 2011 and published as RFC 6241. The NETCONF protocol specification is an Internet Standards Track document. NETCONF provides mechanisms to install, manipulate, and delete the configuration of network devices. Its operations are realized on top of a simple Remote Procedure Call (RPC) layer. The NETCONF protocol uses an Extensible Markup Language (XML) based data encoding for the configuration data as well as the protocol messages. The protocol messages are exchanged on top of a secure transport protocol.

— Wikipedia

Session layer

Session layer

In the seven-layer OSI model of computer networking, the session layer is layer 5. The session layer provides the mechanism for opening, closing and managing a session between end-user application processes, i.e., a semi-permanent dialogue. Communication sessions consist of requests and responses that occur between applications. Session-layer services are commonly used in application environments that make use of remote procedure calls (RPCs). An example of a session-layer protocol is the OSI protocol suite session-layer protocol, also known as X.225 or ISO 8327. In case of a connection loss this protocol may try to recover the connection. If a connection is not used for a long period, the session-layer protocol may close it and re-open it. It provides for either full duplex or half-duplex operation and provides synchronization points in the stream of exchanged messages.Other examples of session layer implementations include Zone Information Protocol (ZIP) – the AppleTalk protocol that coordinates the name binding process, and Session Control Protocol (SCP) – the DECnet Phase IV session-layer protocol. Within the service layering semantics of the OSI network architecture, the session layer responds to service requests from the presentation layer and issues service requests to the transport layer.

— Wikipedia

Open access

Open access

Open access means unrestricted online access to research. Open access can be applied to all forms of published research output, including peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed academic journal articles, conference papers, theses, book chapters, and monographs. Open access comes in two degrees: gratis open access, which is online access free of charge, and libre open access, which is online access free of charge and with some additional usage rights. These additional usage rights are often granted through the use of various specific Creative Commons licenses. Only libre open access is fully compliant with definitions of open access such as the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. Two of the ways authors can provide open access are by self-archiving their journal articles in an open access repository, also known as 'green' open access, or by publishing in an open access journal, known as 'gold' open access. With green open access authors publish in any journal and then self-archive a version of the article for gratis public use in their institutional repository, in a central repository, or on some other open access website.

— Freebase

Application Configuration Access Protocol

Application Configuration Access Protocol

The Application Configuration Access Protocol is a protocol for storing and synchronizing general configuration and preference data. It was originally developed so that IMAP clients can easily access address books, user options, and other data on a central server and be kept in synch across all clients. Two International ACAP Conferences were held, one in Pittsburgh, PA, USA, in 1997, and the other at Qualcomm Incorporated, San Diego, CA, USA, in February, 1998. ACAP grew to encompass several other areas, including bookmark management for web browsers -- it's effectively a roaming protocol for Internet applications. ACAP is in use by at least four clients and three servers to varying degrees, but it has never achieved the popularity of Lightweight Directory Access Protocol or SyncML. It is a deceptively simple protocol, but the combination of three key features, hierarchical data, fine-grained access control, and "contexts" or saved searches with notification, has caused serious problems for server implementors. Unlike LDAP, ACAP was designed for frequent writes, disconnected mode access, and so on. It also handles data inheritance, sometimes known as stacking, which provides easy creation of defaults.

— Freebase

Bootstrap Protocol

Bootstrap Protocol

In computer networking, the Bootstrap Protocol, or BOOTP, is a network protocol used by a network client to obtain an IP address from a configuration server. The BOOTP protocol was originally defined in RFC 951. BOOTP is usually used during the bootstrap process when a computer is starting up. A BOOTP configuration server assigns an IP address to each client from a pool of addresses. BOOTP uses the User Datagram Protocol as a transport on IPv4 networks only. Historically, BOOTP has also been used for Unix-like diskless workstations to obtain the network location of their boot image in addition to an IP address, and also by enterprises to roll out a pre-configured client installation to newly installed PCs. Originally requiring the use of a boot floppy disk to establish the initial network connection, manufacturers of network cards later embedded the protocol in the BIOS of the interface cards as well as system boards with on-board network adapters, thus allowing direct network booting. The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol is a more advanced protocol for the same purpose and has superseded the use of BOOTP. Most DHCP servers also function as BOOTP servers.

— Freebase

Internet Protocol

Internet Protocol

The Internet Protocol is the principal communications protocol in the Internet protocol suite for relaying datagrams across network boundaries. Its routing function enables internetworking, and essentially establishes the Internet. IP, as the primary protocol in the Internet layer of the Internet protocol suite, has the task of delivering packets from the source host to the destination host solely based on the IP addresses. For this purpose, IP defines datagram structures that encapsulate the data to be delivered. It also defines addressing methods that are used to label the datagram with source and destination information. Historically, IP was the connectionless datagram service in the original Transmission Control Program introduced by Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn in 1974; the other being the connection-oriented Transmission Control Protocol. The Internet protocol suite is therefore often referred to as TCP/IP. The first major version of IP, Internet Protocol Version 4, is the dominant protocol of the internet. Its successor is Internet Protocol Version 6.

— Freebase

Stimulus protocol

Stimulus protocol

In telephony, a stimulus protocol is a type of protocol that is used to carry event notifications between end points. Such a protocol is used to control the operation of devices at each end of the link. However a stimulus protocol is not sensitive to the system state. In a typical application such a protocol will carry keystroke information from a telephone set to a central call control. It may also carry control information for simple types of text displays. MiNET from Mitel is a typical protocol of this sort. Stimulus protocols are most suited to networks with dumb peripherals and intelligent centralized applications (see intelligent network). This is in contrast to functional protocols which are best suited to a network with an intelligent periphery and a dumb core (see dumb network). Because these architectures share core hardware over large numbers of peripherals, large and expensive computing capabilities in terms of both hardware and software may be supplied. These centralized architectures excel in solving the problems of complexity for large scale applications since the investment in hardware and software may be amortized across a great many users. However the same virtue of large scale sharing prevents these architectures from providing any significant degree of customization to the preferences of the individual user. The most that can be supplied is a degree of parameterization of service operation. With their suitability tied to the virtues of centralized network architectures, stimulus protocols are being deprecated in favor of functional protocols with the rise of the Internet. A functional protocol such as Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) from the IETF is more suited for Internet applications.

— Wikipedia

.htaccess

.htaccess

An .htaccess (hypertext access) file is a directory-level configuration file supported by several web servers, used for configuration of website-access issues, such as URL redirection, URL shortening, access control (for different web pages and files), and more. The 'dot' (period or full stop) before the file name makes it a hidden file in Unix-based environments. A site could have more than one .htaccess file, and the files are placed inside the web tree (i.e. inside directories and their sub-directories), and hence their other name distributed configuration files..htaccess files act as a subset of the server's global configuration file (like httpd.conf) for the directory that they are in, or all sub-directories.The original purpose of .htaccess—reflected in its name—was to allow per-directory access control by, for example, requiring a password to access World Wide Web content. More commonly, however, the .htaccess files define or override many other configuration settings such as content type, character set, Common Gateway Interface handlers, etc.

— Wikipedia

Point-to-point protocol

Point-to-point protocol

In networking, the Point-to-Point Protocol is a data link protocol commonly used in establishing a direct connection between two networking nodes. It can provide connection authentication, transmission encryption, and compression. PPP is used over many types of physical networks including serial cable, phone line, trunk line, cellular telephone, specialized radio links, and fiber optic links such as SONET. PPP is also used over Internet access connections. Internet service providers have used PPP for customer dial-up access to the Internet, since IP packets cannot be transmitted over a modem line on their own, without some data link protocol. Two derivatives of PPP, Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet and Point-to-Point Protocol over ATM, are used most commonly by Internet Service Providers to establish a Digital Subscriber Line Internet service connection with customers. PPP is commonly used as a data link layer protocol for connection over synchronous and asynchronous circuits, where it has largely superseded the older Serial Line Internet Protocol and telephone company mandated standards. PPP was designed to work with numerous network layer protocols, including Internet Protocol, TRILL, Novell's Internetwork Packet Exchange, NBF and AppleTalk.

— Freebase

User Datagram Protocol

User Datagram Protocol

The User Datagram Protocol is one of the core members of the Internet protocol suite. With UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagrams, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol network without prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths. The protocol was designed by David P. Reed in 1980 and formally defined in RFC 768. UDP uses a simple transmission model with a minimum of protocol mechanism. It has no handshaking dialogues, and thus exposes any unreliability of the underlying network protocol to the user's program. As this is normally IP over unreliable media, there is no guarantee of delivery, ordering or duplicate protection. UDP provides checksums for data integrity, and port numbers for addressing different functions at the source and destination of the datagram. UDP is suitable for purposes where error checking and correction is either not necessary or performed in the application, avoiding the overhead of such processing at the network interface level. Time-sensitive applications often use UDP because dropping packets is preferable to waiting for delayed packets, which may not be an option in a real-time system. If error correction facilities are needed at the network interface level, an application may use the Transmission Control Protocol or Stream Control Transmission Protocol which are designed for this purpose.

— Freebase

Internet Protocol

Internet Protocol

The Internet Protocol (IP) is the principal communications protocol in the Internet protocol suite for relaying datagrams across network boundaries. Its routing function enables internetworking, and essentially establishes the Internet. IP has the task of delivering packets from the source host to the destination host solely based on the IP addresses in the packet headers. For this purpose, IP defines packet structures that encapsulate the data to be delivered. It also defines addressing methods that are used to label the datagram with source and destination information. Historically, IP was the connectionless datagram service in the original Transmission Control Program introduced by Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn in 1974, which was complemented by a connection-oriented service that became the basis for the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). The Internet protocol suite is therefore often referred to as TCP/IP. The first major version of IP, Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4), is the dominant protocol of the Internet. Its successor is Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), which has been in increasing deployment on the public Internet since c. 2006.

— Wikipedia

Media Gateway Control Protocol

Media Gateway Control Protocol

The Media Gateway Control Protocol is an implementation of the Media Gateway Control Protocol architecture for controlling media gateways on Internet Protocol networks connected to the public switched telephone network. The general architecture and programming interface is described in RFC 2805 and the current specific MGCP definition is RFC 3435 which obsoleted RFC 2705. It is a successor to the Simple Gateway Control Protocol which was developed by Bellcore and Cisco. In November 1998, the Simple Gateway Control Protocol was combined with Level 3 Communications Internet Protocol Device Control to form the Media Gateway Control Protocol. MGCP is a signalling and call control communications protocol used in Voice over IP systems that typically inter-operate with the public switched telephone network. As such it implements a PSTN-over-IP model with the power of the network residing in a call control center softswitch which is similar to the central office of the PSTN. The endpoints are low-intelligence devices, mostly executing control commands. The protocol represents a decomposition of other VoIP models, such as H.323, in which the media gateways, e.g., H.323's gatekeeper, have higher levels of signalling intelligence.

— Freebase

Rogue access point

Rogue access point

A rogue access point is a wireless access point that has either been installed on a secure company network without explicit authorization from a local network administrator, or has been created to allow a hacker to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack. Rogue access points of the first kind can pose a security threat to large organizations with many employees, because anyone with access to the premises can install an inexpensive wireless router that can potentially allow access to a secure network to unauthorized parties. Rogue access points of the second kind target networks that do not employ mutual authentication and may be used in conjunction with a rogue RADIUS server, depending on security configuration of the target network. To prevent the installation of rogue access points, organizations can install wireless intrusion prevention systems to monitor the radio spectrum for unauthorized access points. Presence of a large number of wireless access points can be sensed in airspace of a typical enterprise facility. These include managed access points in the secure network plus access points in the neighborhood. A wireless intrusion prevention system facilitates the job of auditing these access points on a continuous basis to learn whether there are any rogue access points among them.

— Freebase

EPAS

EPAS

EPAS is a non-commercial cooperation initiative launched in Europe which aims at developing a series of data protocols to be applied in a point of interaction environment. The project intends to address the three following protocols : a terminal management protocol; a retailer application protocol; an acquirer protocol. The main objectives common to the three protocols are: protocol interoperability : each protocol is designed in such a way as to be independent of the external device and the POI; independence of the system architecture and the integration level of the POI within the retailer application protocol; independence of the communication support and low level protocols : each protocol is independent of the network connection and will address both wire and wireless connections.

— Freebase

RADIUS

RADIUS

Remote Authentication Dial In User Service is a networking protocol that provides centralized Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting management for computers that connect and use a network service. RADIUS was developed by Livingston Enterprises, Inc. in 1991 as an access server authentication and accounting protocol and later brought into the Internet Engineering Task Force standards. Because of the broad support and the ubiquitous nature of the RADIUS protocol, it is often used by ISPs and enterprises to manage access to the Internet or internal networks, wireless networks, and integrated e-mail services. These networks may incorporate modems, DSL, access points, VPNs, network ports, web servers, etc. RADIUS is a client/server protocol that runs in the application layer, using UDP as transport. The Remote Access Server, the Virtual Private Network server, the Network switch with port-based authentication, and the Network Access Server, are all gateways that control access to the network, and all have a RADIUS client component that communicates with the RADIUS server. The RADIUS server is usually a background process running on a UNIX or Microsoft Windows server. RADIUS serves three functions:

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "spread out"?
  • A. circularise
  • B. unfold
  • C. concentrated
  • D. dissipate