Synonyms containing at all hours

We've found 36,567 synonyms:

All

All

awl, adj. the whole of: every one of: any whatever.—adv. wholly: completely: entirely: (Shak.) only, alone.—n. the whole: everything: the totality of things—the universe.—n. All′-Fath′er, God.—All (obs.), entirely, altogether, as in 'all to-brake' (Judges, ix. 53). The prefix to- originally belonged to the verb (tó brecan), but as verbs with this prefix were rarely used without all, the fact was forgotten, and the to was erroneously regarded as belonging to the all. Hence came into use all-to = wholly, utterly; All but, everything short of, almost; All in all, all things in all respects, all or everything together—(adverbially) altogether; All over, thoroughly, entirely; All over with, finished, done with (also coll., All up with); All right, a colloquial phrase expressing assent or approbation; All's one, it is just the same; All to one (obs.), altogether.—After all, when everything has been considered, nevertheless; And all, and everything else; And all that, and all the rest of it, et cetera; At all, in the least degree or to the least extent.—For all, notwithstanding; For good and all, finally.—Once for all, once only. [A.S. all, eal; Ger. all, Gael. uile, W. oll.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hour

Hour

owr, n. 60 min., or the 24th part of a day: the time indicated by a clock, &c.: an hour's journey, or three miles: a time or occasion; (pl., myth.) the goddesses of the seasons and the hours: set times of prayer, the canonical hours, the offices or services prescribed for these, or a book containing them.—ns. Hour′-cir′cle, a circle passing through the celestial poles and fixed relatively to the earth: the circle of an equatorial which shows the hour-angle of the point to which the telescope is directed; Hour′-glass, an instrument for measuring the hours by the running of sand from one glass vessel into another; Hour′-hand, the hand which shows the hour on a clock, &c.—adj. Hour′ly, happening or done every hour: frequent.—adv. every hour: frequently.—n. Hour′plate, the plate of a timepiece on which the hours are marked: the dial.—At the eleventh hour, at the last moment possible (Matt. xx. 6, 9); In a good, or evil, hour, acting under a fortunate, or an unfortunate, impulse—from the old belief in astrological influences; Keep good hours, to go to bed and to rise early: to lead a quiet and regular life; The hour is come, the destined day of fate has come (John, xiii. 1); The small hours, the early hours of the morning; Three hours service, a service held continuously on Good Friday, from noon to 3 P.M., in commemoration of the time of Christ's agony on the cross. [O. Fr. hore (Fr. heure)—L. hora—Gr. hōra.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Course credit

Course credit

A course credit is a unit that gives weighting to the value, level or time requirements of an academic course taken at a school or other educational institution. In high schools, where all courses are usually the same number of hours, often meeting every day, students earn one credit for a course that lasts all year, or a half credit per course per semester. This credit is formally known as a Carnegie Unit. After a typical four-year run, the student needs 24 to 28 credits to graduate. Some high schools have only three years of school because 9th grade is part of their middle schools, with 18 to 21 credits required. In a college or university, students typically receive credit hours based on the number of "contact hours" per week in class, for one term; formally, Semester Credit Hours. A contact hour includes any lecture or lab time when the professor is teaching the student or coaching the student while they apply the course information to an activity. Regardless of the duration of the course and depending on the state or jurisdiction, a semester credit hour is 15-16 contact hours per semester. Most college and university courses are 3 Semester Credit Hours SCH or 45-48 contact hours, so they typically meet for three hours per week over a 15 week semester. To provide students with the minimum 45-48 contact hours while accounting for holidays, college start dates, etc., many courses will have 50 or more contact hours. Otherwise, a Monday course may have only 42 contact hours, while a Tuesday course may have 48 contact hours. Faculty in community colleges typically teach 15 SCH or more per semester. Faculty in comprehensive or baccalaureate colleges and universities typically have a 12 SCH per semester. Faculty teaching significant graduate work or large classes may have "load lifts" or "course reductions." Faculty at research universities typically have an official teaching load of 12 SCH per semester, but their actual load is reduced because of the requirement for significant peer reviewed published research.

— Freebase

All

All

the whole quantity, extent, duration, amount, quality, or degree of; the whole; the whole number of; any whatever; every; as, all the wheat; all the land; all the year; all the strength; all happiness; all abundance; loss of all power; beyond all doubt; you will see us all (or all of us)

— Webster Dictionary

Utilization rate

Utilization rate

In business, the utilization rate is an important number for firms that charge their time to clients and for those that need to maximize the productive time of their employees. It can reflect the billing efficiency or the overall productive use of an individual or a firm. Looked at simply, there are two methods to calculate the utilization rate. The first method calculates the number of billable hours divided by the number of hours recorded in a particular time period. For example, if 40 hours of time is recorded in a week but only 30 hours of that was billable, the utilization rate would then be 30 / 40 = 75%. With this method, however, it's easy to see how this utilization rate can be gamed: if a business stops recording non-billable time, its utilization rate will always be 100%. The second way to calculate the utilization rate is to take the number of billable hours and divide by a fixed number of hours per week. For example, if 32 hours of billable time are recorded in a fixed 40-hour week, the utilization rate would then be 32 / 40 = 80%. Note that with this second method it is possible to have a utilization rate that exceeds 100%. If 50 hours of billable time are recorded in a fixed 40-hour week, then the utilization rate would be 50 / 40 = 125%. Another consideration is the in-/exclusion of absent hours, e.g. leave or illness. Common practice is to exclude these from utilization calculations. Differences in how utilization is measured can also drive different behaviors, and some organizations may employ multiple utilization measures. For instance, an independent professional services or consulting firm may rely solely on billable utilization. An organization that sells products as well as implementation or support services may utilize the notion of "productive" utilization, which also measures and rewards time on activities like product development that are important, but which may not be billed directly to a client.

— Wikipedia

all

all

The total quantity; quite; wholly.--All aback, when all the sails are taken aback by the winds.--All ahoo, or all-a-ugh, confused; hanging over; crooked.--All-a-taunt-o, a ship fully rigged, with masts in and yards crossed.--All hands, the whole ship's company.--All hands ahoy, the boatswain's summons for the whole crew to repair on deck, in distinction from the watch.--All hands make sail! the cheering order when about to chase a strange vessel.--All hands to quarters! the call in armed merchantmen, answering to the Beat to quarters in a man-of-war.--All in the wind, when a vessel's head is too close to the wind, so that all her sails are shivering.--All over, resemblance to a particular object, as a ship in bad kelter: "she's a privateer all over."--All overish, the state of feeling when a man is neither ill nor well, restless in bed and indifferent to meals. In the tropics this is considered as the premonitory symptom of disease, and a warning which should be looked to.--All ready, the answer from the tops when the sails are cast loose, and ready to be dropped.--All standing, fully equipped, or with clothes on. To be brought up all standing, is to be suddenly checked or stopped, without any preparation.--Paid off all standing, without unrigging or waiting to return stores; perhaps recommissioned the next day or hour.--All's well, the sentry's call at each bell struck (or half hour) between the periods of broad daylight, or from 8 P.M. to 4 A.M.--All to pieces, a phrase used for out-and-out, extremely, or excessively; as, "we beat her in sailing all to pieces."--All weathers, any time or season; continually.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Working time

Working time

Working time is the period of time that an individual spends at paid occupational labor. Unpaid labors such as personal housework or caring for children/pets are not considered part of the working week. Many countries regulate the work week by law, such as stipulating minimum daily rest periods, annual holidays and a maximum number of working hours per week. Working time may vary from person to person often depending on location, culture, lifestyle choice, and the profitability of the individuals livelihood. For example someone who is supporting children and paying a large mortgage will need to work more hours to meet a basic cost of living than someone without children of the same earning power. As fewer people than ever are having children choosing part time is becoming more popular. Standard working hours refers to the legislation to limit the working hours per day, per week, per month or per year. If an employee needs to work overtime, the employer will need to pay overtime payments to employees as required in the law. Generally speaking, standard working hours of countries worldwide are around 40 to 44 hours per week, and the additional overtime payments are around 25% to 50% to the normal hourly payments. Maximum working hours refers to the maximum working hours of an employee. The employee cannot work more than the level specified in the maximum working hours law.

— Freebase

Business hours

Business hours

Business hours are the hours during the day in which business is commonly conducted. Typical business hours vary widely by country. By observing common informal standards for business hours, workers may communicate with each other more easily and find a convenient divide between work life and home life. In the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, the hours between 9 am and 5 pm are typically considered to be standard business hours, although in the United States this varies by region due to local tradition and the need to conduct business by telephone with people in other time zones. For instance, business in Chicago is often conducted between 8 am and 4:30 pm, while in New York City, business hours tend to be later—for instance, from 10 am to 6 pm. On Saturdays businesses are usually open from 8 or 9 am to noon or 1 pm. In Mexico, the standard business hours are from 7 am to 2 pm and 4 pm to 6 pm. In Finland, government agencies and other institutions follow the hours 8:00–16:15. Banks are usually open to 16:30. Common business is done from Monday to Friday, but major shops are usually open on Saturdays 9:00-18:00 and on Sundays 12:00-21:00, with exceptions.

— Freebase

Utilization rate

Utilization rate

Utilization Rate is an important number for firms that charge their time to clients. It shows the billing efficiency of an individual or a firm. There are two methods to calculate utilization rate: 1. The first method calculates the number of billable hours divided by the number of hours recorded in a particular time period. For example, let's say that I recorded 40 hours of time this past week but only 30 hours of that was billable. My utilization rate would then be 30 / 40 = 75%. With this method, however, it's easy to see how this utilization rate can be gamed: if I stop recording non-billable time, my utilization rate will always be 100%. 2. The second way to calculate utilization rate is to take the number of billable hours and divide by a fixed number of hours per week. For example, let's say that I recorded 32 hours of billable time in a 40 hour week. My utilization rate would then be 32 / 40 = 80%. Note that with this second method it's possible to have a utilization rate that exceeds 100%. If I recorded 50 hours of billable time last week then I'd have a utilization rate of 50 / 40 = 125%.

— Freebase

Liturgy of the Hours

Liturgy of the Hours

The Liturgy of the Hours or Divine Office or canonical hours, often referred to as the Breviary, is the official set of daily prayers prescribed by the Catholic Church to be recited by clergy, religious institutes, and the laity. It consists primarily of psalms supplemented by hymns, readings and other prayers. Together with the Mass, it constitutes the official public prayer life of the Church. Daily recitation of the Liturgy of the Hours is a canonical obligation everywhere for priests and for deacons aspiring to the priesthood; the extent of the obligation for permanent deacons is determined by the relevant episcopal conference. The Liturgy of the Hours also forms the basis of prayer within Christian monasticism. The Liturgy of the Hours, along with the Eucharist, has formed part of the Church's public worship from the earliest times. Christians of both Eastern and Western traditions celebrate the Liturgy of the Hours under various names. Within Catholicism, the Liturgy of the Hours, once contained within what was called the Roman Breviary, is in its present form found in what in English editions is called either The Liturgy of the Hours or The Divine Office.

— Freebase

Omni-

Omni-

om′ni, from L. omnis, all, a combining form, as in adjs. Omnifā′rious, of all varieties or kinds; Omnif′erous, bearing or producing all kinds; Omnif′ic, all-creating; Om′niform, of, or capable of, every form.—n. Omniform′ity.—v.t. Om′nify (rare), to make universal.—adj. Omnig′enous, consisting of all kinds.—n. Omnipar′ity, general equality.—adjs. Omnip′arous, producing all things; Omnipā′tient, enduring all things.—ns. Omnip′otence, Omnip′otency, unlimited power—an attribute of God.—adj. Omnip′otent, all-powerful, possessing unlimited power.—adv. Omnip′otently.—n. Omnipres′ence, quality of being present everywhere at the same time—an attribute of God.—adj. Omnipres′ent, present everywhere at the same time.—n. Omnisc′ience, knowledge of all things—an attribute of God.—adj. Omnisc′ient, all-knowing: all-seeing: infinitely wise.—adv. Omnisc′iently.—adj. Omniv′orous, all-devouring: (zool.) feeding on both animal and vegetable food.—The Omnipotent, God.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Book of hours

Book of hours

A book of hours is an illuminated, Christian devotional book that was popular among the Christians of Northern Europe during the Middle Ages. A typical book of hours contains: ⁕A calendar of the liturgical year ⁕An excerpt from each of the four canonical gospels ⁕The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary ⁕The fifteen Psalms of Degrees ⁕The seven Penitential Psalms ⁕A Litany of Saints ⁕An Office for the Dead ⁕The Hours of the Cross ⁕Various other Christian prayers Sometimes included are the Marian prayers Obsecro te and O Intemerata, as well as devotions for use at Mass, meditations on the Passion of Christ, and other works. This book format is an abridgement of the breviary, a liturgical book that contains the Liturgy of the Hours recited in monasteries. The book of hours was developed for lay people who wished to incorporate elements of monasticism into their devotional life. In spiritual practice, a person might read or recite from the prayers or excerpts from Psalms. Tens of thousands of books of hours survive to the present day. Indeed, most of the extant medieval illuminated manuscripts are books of hours, although many of these have minimal decoration, and no illustrations at all. Some of the books made for wealthy patrons, however, were extremely lavish, boasting brightly coloured, full-page miniatures.

— Freebase

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time employment is employment in which a person works a minimum number of hours defined as such by his/her employer. Full-time employment often comes with benefits that are not typically offered to part-time, temporary, or flexible workers, such as annual leave, sickleave, and health insurance. Full-time jobs are often considered careers. They generally pay more than part-time jobs, and usually carry more hours per week. The Fair Labor Standards Act does not define full-time employment or part-time employment. This is a matter generally to be determined by the employer. The definition by employer can vary and is generally published in a company's Employee Handbook. Companies commonly require from 30–35 or 40 hours per week to be defined as full-time and therefore eligible for benefits. Full-Time status varies between company and is often based on the shift the employee must work during each work week. The "standard" work week consists of five eight-hour days, commonly served between 9:00AM to 5:00PM totaling 40 hours. While a four-day week generally consists of four ten-hour days; it may also consist of as little as nine hours for a total of a 36 hour work week. Twelve-hour shifts are often three days per week, unless the company has the intention of paying out the employee overtime. Overtime is legally paid out anytime an employee works more than 40 hours per week. The legal minimum for overtime starts at Base Pay + One-Half. The increased payout is considered to compensate slightly for the increased fatigue which a person experiences on such long shifts. Shifts can also be very irregular, as in retail, but are still full-time if the required number of hours is reached. There are some situations where a person who needs full-time work is dropped to part-time, which is sometimes a form of constructive dismissal to avoid paying unemployment benefits to a laid-off worker.

— Freebase

Full-time job

Full-time job

A full-time job is employment in which a person works a minimum number of hours defined as such by their employer. Full-time employment often comes with benefits that are not typically offered to part-time, temporary, or flexible workers, such as annual leave, sickleave, and health insurance. Part-time jobs are mistakenly thought by some to not be careers. However, legislation exists to stop employers from discriminating against part-time workers so this should not be a factor when making decisions on career advancement. They generally pay more than part-time jobs per hour, and this is similarly discriminatory if the pay decision is based on part-time status as a primary factor. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not define full-time employment or part-time employment. This is a matter generally to be determined by the employer (US Department of Labor). The definition by employer can vary and is generally published in a company's Employee Handbook. Companies commonly require from 32 to 40 hours per week to be defined as full-time and therefore eligible for benefits. Full-time status varies between company and is often based on the shift the employee must work during each work week. The "standard" work week consists of five eight-hour days, commonly served between 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM or 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM totaling 40 hours. While a four-day week generally consists of four ten-hour days, it may also consist of as little as nine hours for a total of a 36-hour work week. Twelve-hour shifts are often three days per week, unless the company has the intention of paying out the employee overtime. Overtime is legally paid out anytime an employee works more than 40 hours per week. The legal minimum for overtime starts at Base Pay + One-Half. The increased payout is considered to compensate slightly for the increased fatigue which a person experiences on such long shifts. Shifts can also be very irregular, as in retail, but are still full-time if the required number of hours is reached. There are some situations where a person who needs full-time work is dropped to part-time, which is sometimes a form of constructive dismissal to avoid paying unemployment benefits to a laid-off worker.

— Wikipedia

Man-hour

Man-hour

A man-hour or person-hour is the amount of work performed by the average worker in one hour. It is used in written "estimates" for estimation of the total amount of uninterrupted labour required to perform a task. For example, researching and writing a college paper might require twenty man-hours. Preparing a family banquet from scratch might require ten man-hours. Man-hours do not take account of the breaks that people generally require from work, e.g. for rest, eating, and other bodily functions. They only count pure labour. Managers count the man-hours and add break time to estimate the amount of time a task will actually take to complete. Thus, while one college course's written paper might require twenty man-hours to carry out, it almost certainly will not get done in twenty consecutive hours. Its progress will be interrupted by work for other courses, meals, sleep, and other distractions.

— Freebase

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. perky
  • B. heavy
  • C. chirpy
  • D. floaty