Synonyms containing battalion landing team

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Battalion chief

Battalion chief

A battalion chief is the rank and title of a subordinate fire chief or commanding officer in the firefighting command structure. The title of battalion chief is usually synonymous with firefighting in the United States and Canada. A battalion chief is the lowest chief officer in a fire department's rank structure, above rank-and-file fire station and fire company officers. A battalion chief commands a firefighting battalion, similar to a military battalion. A battalion consists of several fire stations and multiple fire companies. A battalion chief has command over each fire station's officers and each company or unit's officers, as well as the uniformed firefighters. A battalion chief is usually under the command of a division chief, deputy chief, or assistant chief, who in turn reports to a chief of department, chief engineer, or a fire commissioner. Several Fire Departments, including The Detroit Fire Department, The New York City Fire Department, The Chicago Fire Department, The Sacramento Fire Department, CAL FIRE, Philadelphia Fire Department and the Los Angeles County Fire Department all have battalion chiefs in their rank structure. In the Boston Fire Department and the Toronto Fire Services, however, the title of district chief is used in place of battalion chief.

— Wikipedia

Battalion

Battalion

A battalion is a military unit with 300 to 1,200 soldiers that usually conists of two to seven companies and is commanded by either a lieutenant colonel or a colonel. Several battalions form a regiment or brigade. The nomenclature varies by nationality and by branch of arms, for instance, some armies organize their infantry into battalions, but call battalion-sized cavalry, reconnaissance, or tank units a squadron or a regiment instead. There may even be subtle distinctions within a nation's branches of arms, such as a distinction between a tank battalion and an armored squadron, depending on how the unit's operational role is perceived to fit into the army's historical organization. A battalion is generally the smallest military unit capable of independent operations, although many armies have smaller units that are self-sustaining. The battalion is usually part of a regiment, brigade, or group, depending on the organizational model used by that service. The bulk of a battalion will ordinarily be homogeneous with respect to type, although there are many exceptions. Every battalion will also include some sort of combat service support, typically organized within a combat support company.

— Freebase

Team

Team

tēm, n. a number of animals moving together or in order: two or more oxen or other animals harnessed to the same vehicle; a number of persons associated for doing anything conjointly, playing a game, &c.—v.t. to join together in a team: to give work to a gang under a sub-contractor.—adj. Teamed (Spens.), arranged in a team.—n. Team′ster, one who drives a team.—adv. Team′wise, like a team, harnessed together. [A.S. teám, offspring; prob. teón, to draw.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Belly landing

Belly landing

A belly landing or gear-up landing occurs when an aircraft lands without its landing gear fully extended and uses its underside, or belly, as its primary landing device. Normally the term gear-up landing refers to incidents in which the pilot forgets to extend the landing gear, while belly landing refers to incidents where a mechanical malfunction prevents the pilot from extending the landing gear. During a belly landing, there is normally extensive damage to the airplane. Belly landings carry the risk that the aircraft may flip over, disintegrate, or catch fire if it lands too fast or too hard. Extreme precision is needed to ensure that the plane lands as straight and level as possible while maintaining enough airspeed to maintain control. Strong crosswinds, low visibility, damage to the airplane, or unresponsive instruments or controls greatly increase the danger of performing a belly landing. Still, belly landings are one of the most common types of aircraft accidents, and are normally not fatal if executed carefully.

— Freebase

Team leader

Team leader

A team leader is someone who provides guidance, instruction, direction and leadership to a group of individuals (the team) for the purpose of achieving a key result or group of aligned results. The team leader monitors the quantitative and qualitative achievements of the team and reports results to a manager (a manager may oversee multiple teams). The leader often works within the team, as a member, carrying out the same roles but with the additional 'leader' responsibilities - as opposed to higher level management which often has a separate job role altogether. In order for a team to function successfully, the team leader must also motivate the team to "use their knowledge and skills to achieve the shared goals.". When a team leader motivates a team, group members can function in a goal oriented manner. A "team leader" is also someone who has the capability to drive performance within a group of people. Team leaders utilize their expertise, their peers, influence, and/or creativeness to formulate an effective team. Scouller (2011) defined the purpose of a leader (including a team leader) as follows: "The purpose of a leader is to make sure there is leadership … to ensure that all four dimensions of leadership are [being addressed].” The four dimensions being: (1) a shared, motivating team purpose or vision or goal (2) action, progress and results (3) collective unity or team spirit (4) attention to individuals. Leaders also contribute by leading through example. Team Leader Core Responsibilities: Assemble team members with a combination of skills required to accomplish goal Develop a strategy by which team members can use to reach the project goal Assign tasks to team members including those that he/she will manage Determine completion timeline and monitor progress to ensure project is on track Communicate progress to upper level management

— Wikipedia

Landing zone

Landing zone

In military terminology a landing zone is an area where aircraft can land. In the United States military, a landing zone is the actual point where aircraft land In commonwealth militaries, a landing zone is the cartographic zone in which the landing is going to take place. The landing area is the area in which the landing is going to take place. The landing point is the point on which aircraft are going to land. Each aircraft has a different landing point.

— Freebase

Deadstick landing

Deadstick landing

A deadstick landing, also called a dead-stick landing, is a type of forced landing when an aircraft loses all of its propulsive power and is forced to land. The "stick" does not refer to the flight controls, which in most aircraft are either fully or partially functional without engine power, but to the traditional wooden propeller, which without power would just be a "dead stick". All fixed-wing aircraft have some capability to glide with no engine power; that is, they do not sink straight down like a stone, but rather continue to glide horizontally while descending. For example, with a glide ratio of 15:1, a Boeing 747-200 can glide for 150 kilometers from a cruising altitude of 10,000 meters. After a loss of power, the pilot’s goal is to fly the descending aircraft to the most suitable landing spot within gliding distance, and then land with the least amount of damage possible. The area open for potential landing sites depends on the original altitude, local terrain, the engine-out gliding capabilities of the aircraft, original airspeed and winds at various altitudes. The success of the deadstick landing largely depends on the availability of suitable landing areas. A competent pilot gliding a relatively light, slow plane to a flat field or runway should result in an otherwise normal landing. A heavier, faster aircraft or a plane gliding into mountains and/or trees could result in substantial damage.

— Freebase

Follow-on

Follow-on

Follow-on is a term used in the sport of cricket to describe a situation where the team that bats second is forced to take its second batting innings immediately after its first, because the team was not able to get close enough to the score achieved by the first team batting in the first innings. If the second team to bat scores substantially fewer runs than the first team, the first team can enforce the follow-on, instructing the second team to bat again immediately. In this case the sequence of batting innings will be first team, second team, second team and then, if needed, the first team again. This is in contrast to the normal progression of batting innings which is first team, second team, first team, second team. This rules governing the circumstances in which the follow-on may be enforced are found in Law 13 of the Laws of cricket.

— Freebase

Soft landing

Soft landing

A soft landing in the business cycle is the process of an economy shifting from growth to slow-growth to potentially flat, as it approaches but avoids a recession. It is usually caused by government attempts to slow down inflation. The criteria for distinguishing between a hard and soft landing are numerous and subjective. The term was adapted to economics from its origins in the early days of flight, when it historically was the method of the landing of hot air balloons, by gradually reducing their buoyancy. It later also applied to aviation, gliders and spacecraft, as in the Lunar lander. In the United States, modern recessions and hard and soft landings follow from Federal Reserve tightening cycles, in which the Federal funds rate is increased over several consecutive moves. In modern times, the most notable, and possibly the only true soft landing in the most recent 16 business cycles occurred in the soft landing of 1994, engineered by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan through fine tuning of interest rates and the money supply. In addition to being a certain type of business cycle, a soft landing may also refer to a market segment or industry sector that is expected to slow down, but to not crash, while the wider economy may not experience such a slow down at that time. For example, a contemporary newspaper headline read: "Soft landing forecast for house prices as rate hikes stem growth".

— Freebase

Abteilung

Abteilung

Abteilung is a German word that is often used for German or Swiss military formations, and depending on its usage could mean detachment, department, or battalion. It is not uncommon for it to be used in Germans in a more civilian fashion to mean "office department". During the Second World War, the term abteilung generally meant "battalion" and was used for battalion-size formations in the armoured, cavalry, reconnaissance and artillery arms of the Wehrmacht and Waffen SS. For example schwere panzerabteilung translates to "heavy tank battalion". But when the term was used for large military formations, it generally meant "detachment". For example armee abteilung translates to "army detachment" and korps abteilung to "corps detachment".

— Freebase

Mariposa Battalion

Mariposa Battalion

Mariposa Battalion was a California State Militia unit formed in 1851 to fight the Yosemites and Chowchillas in the Mariposa War.After a force under Mariposa County Sheriff James Burney was found unequal to the task of defeating the Natives, Burney made an appeal to Governor John McDougal for help. This led to authorizing an organization of two hundred men into the Mariposa Battalion.The Mariposa Battalion was mustered 12 February 1851. Sheriff Burney was the first choice for the major to command the unit, but Burney declined due to his other responsibilities in Mariposa. James D. Savage was then chosen as major, primarily due to his scouting abilities. The battalion was divided into three companies: Company A commanded by John J. Kuykendall, with seventy men; Company B under John Boling, with seventy-two men; and Company C, under William Dill, with fifty-five men. Other officers elected included M. B. Lewis as Adjutant, A. Brunson as surgeon and Vincent Hailor as guide.A camp was established two and one-half miles from the town of Mariposa near Savage's Agua Fria trading post.

— Wikipedia

Water landing

Water landing

A water landing is, in the broadest sense, any landing on a body of water. All waterfowl, those seabirds capable of flight, and some human-built vehicles are capable of landing in water as a matter of course. The phrase "water landing" is also used as a euphemism for crash-landing into water in an aircraft not designed for the purpose. The National Transportation Safety Board of the United States government defines "ditching" in its aviation accident coding manual as "a planned event in which a flight crew knowingly makes a controlled emergency landing in water." Such water landings are extremely rare for commercial passenger airlines.

— Freebase

Team building

Team building

Team building is a philosophy of job design in which employees are viewed as members of interdependent teams instead of as individual workers. Team building refers to a wide range of activities, presented to businesses, schools, sports teams, religious or nonprofit organizations designed for improving team performance. Team building is pursued via a variety of practices, and can range from simple bonding exercises to complex simulations and multi-day team building retreats designed to develop a team, usually falling somewhere in between. It generally sits within the theory and practice of organizational development, but can also be applied to sports teams, school groups, and other contexts. Team building is not to be confused with "team recreation" that consists of activities for teams that are strictly recreational. Team building can also be seen in day-to-day operations of an organization and team dynamic can be improved through successful leadership. Team building is said to have benefits of self-development, positive communication, leadership skills and the ability to work closely together as a team to solve problems.

— Freebase

Land

Land

land, n. earth, the solid portion of the surface of the globe: a country: a district: soil: real estate: a nation or people: (Scot.) a group of dwellings or tenements under one roof and having a common entry.—v.t. to set on land or on shore.—v.i. to come on land or on shore.—ns. Land′-ā′gent, a person employed by the owner of an estate to let farms, collect rents, &c.; Land′-breeze, a breeze setting from the land towards the sea; Land′-crab, a family of crabs which live much or chiefly on land.—v.t. Land′damn (Shak.), to banish from the land.—adj. Land′ed, possessing land or estates: consisting in land or real estate.—ns. Land′er, one who lands; Land′fall, a landslip: an approach to land after a voyage, also the land so approached; Land′-fish (Shak.), a fish on land, any one acting contrary to his usual character; Land′-flood, a flooding or overflowing of land by water: inundation; Land′force, a military force serving on land, as distinguished from a naval force; Land′-grab′ber, one who acquires land by harsh and grasping means: one who is eager to occupy land from which others have been evicted; Land′-grab′bing, the act of the land-grabber; Land′-herd, a herd of animals which feed on land; Land′-hold′er, a holder or proprietor of land; Land′-hung′er, greed for the acquisition of land; Land′ing, act of going on land from a vessel: a place for getting on shore: the level part of a staircase between the flights of steps.—adj. relating to the unloading of a vessel's cargo.—ns. Land′ing-net, a kind of scoop-net for landing a fish that has been caught; Land′ing-place, a place for landing, as from a vessel; Land′ing-stage, a platform for landing passengers or goods carried by water, often rising and falling with the tide; Land′-job′ber, a speculator in land; Land′-job′bing; Land′lady, a woman who has property in land or houses: the mistress of an inn or lodging-house.—adj. Land′less (Shak.), without land or property.—v.t. Land′lock, to enclose by land.—-adj. Land′-locked, almost shut in by land, protected by surrounding masses of land from the force of wind and waves.—ns. Land′lord, the owner of land or houses: the master of an inn or lodging-house; Land′lordism, the authority or united action of the landholding class; Land′-lubb′er, a landsman (a term used by sailors); Land′mark, anything serving to mark the boundaries of land: any object on land that serves as a guide to seamen: any distinguishing characteristic; Land′-meas′ure, a system of square measure used in the measurement of land;

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pittsburgh Steelers

Pittsburgh Steelers

The Pittsburgh Steelers are a professional American football team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Steelers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) North division. Founded in 1933, the Steelers are the oldest franchise in the AFC. In contrast with their status as perennial also-rans in the pre-merger NFL, where they were the oldest team never to have won a league championship, the Steelers of the post-merger (modern) era are among the most successful NFL franchises. Pittsburgh is tied with the New England Patriots for the most Super Bowl titles at six, and the team has both played in (16 times) and hosted (11 times) more conference championship games than has any other NFL team. The Steelers have won eight AFC championships, tied with the Denver Broncos, but behind the Patriots' record 11 AFC championships. The team is tied with the Broncos and Dallas Cowboys for the second-most Super Bowl appearances with eight. The Steelers lost their most recent championship appearance, Super Bowl XLV, on February 6, 2011. The Steelers, whose history may be traced to a regional pro team that was established in the early 1920s, joined the NFL as the Pittsburgh Pirates on July 8, 1933. The team was owned by Art Rooney and took its original name from the baseball team of the same name, as was common practice for NFL teams at the time. To distinguish them from the baseball team, local media took to calling the football team the Rooneymen, an unofficial nickname that persisted for decades after the team had adopted its current nickname. The ownership of the Steelers has remained within the Rooney family since the organization's founding. Art Rooney's son, Dan Rooney, owned the team from 1988 until his death in 2017. Much control of the franchise has been given to Dan Rooney's son, Art Rooney II. The Steelers enjoy a large, widespread fanbase nicknamed Steeler Nation. They currently play their home games at Heinz Field on Pittsburgh's North Side in the North Shore neighborhood, which also hosts the University of Pittsburgh Panthers. Built in 2001, the stadium replaced Three Rivers Stadium, which had hosted the Steelers for 31 seasons. Prior to Three Rivers, the Steelers had played their games in Pitt Stadium and at Forbes Field.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. chirpy
  • B. perky
  • C. floaty
  • D. heavy