Synonyms containing belle époque

We've found 172 synonyms:

Belle Époque

Belle Époque

The Belle Époque or La Belle Époque was a period in French and Belgian history that is conventionally dated as starting in 1871 and ending when World War I began in 1914. Occurring during the era of the Third French Republic, it was a period characterized by optimism, peace at home and in Europe, new technology and scientific discoveries. The peace and prosperity in Paris allowed the arts to flourish, and many masterpieces of literature, music, theater, and visual art gained recognition. The Belle Époque was named, in retrospect, when it began to be considered a "golden age" in contrast to the horrors of World War I. In the newly rich United States, emerging from the Panic of 1873, the comparable epoch was dubbed the Gilded Age. In the United Kingdom, the Belle Époque overlapped with the late Victorian era and the Edwardian era. In Germany, the Belle Époque coincided with the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II and in Russia with the reigns of Alexander III and Nicholas II.

— Freebase

Belle

Belle

Belle is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' thirtieth animated feature film Beauty and the Beast. She subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video midquels Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas and Belle's Magical World, direct-to-video spin-off Belle's Tales of Friendship, and television series Sing Me a Story with Belle. From 1991 to 2011, Belle was voiced by American actress and singer Paige O'Hara, who auditioned for the role after she read about it in The New York Times. Since 2011, Belle has been voiced by American actress Julie Nathanson. Created by screenwriter Linda Woolverton and animated by James Baxter and Mark Henn, Belle is the daughter of an infamous inventor named Maurice, with whom she lives in a small town in France. Though perceived by her fellow villagers as "the most beautiful girl in town," Belle is considered strange and an outcast because of her love of reading and non-conformity. Romantically pursued by a handsome but arrogant hunter named Gaston, in whom she shows no romantic interest because of his conceitedness and sexist mentality, Belle dreams of leaving her provincial village life in favor of adventure. When her father is taken prisoner by the Beast, Belle sacrifices her own freedom, taking his place in order to save his life and eventually learning to accept him for who he is despite his appearance. Intelligent, strong-willed, outspoken and brave, Belle is a young woman who refuses to succumb to her village's outdated view on the role of women in society.

— Freebase

Belle Epoque

Belle Epoque

Alternate spelling of Belle Époque.

— Wiktionary

Gaston

Gaston

Gaston is the main villain in the Disney animated movie "Beauty and the Beast". He is a sexist, chauvinistic hunter who wants to marry Belle just so he can brag about it and to give him sons that he can mold at his will. He looks down on her intelligence and culture, believing that a woman's place should be in the kitchen, cooking and cleaning for her husband, not be able to read books and learn about the world. It's for that reason that Belle hates Gaston with a passion, she sees him as nothing more than a rude, selfish, chauvinist, barbarian-brained lunkhead and sexist man who is unworthy of her time. When Belle falls in love with the Beast, Gaston gets insanely jealous. He rallies the town into a mob, saying that the Beast is an evil monster (when, in truth, he is a caring and compassionate being), and together they storm the Beast's castle. Beast's servants fight off the mob, while Gaston goes to confront Beast at the balcony. After a fight, Beast refuses to kill Gaston, not willing to sink to his level. However, Gaston charges the Beast in a blind rage, accidentally falling from the balcony towards his potential death in doing so. He appears as a guest in "House of Mouse", when he's always saying "No one (verb)s like Gaston!". He is one of the Disney villains featured in "House of Villains".

— Freebase

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude is a fictional character in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series of novels by Laurell K. Hamilton. Within the novels, Jean-Claude's role is as one of the primary love interests of the series heroine, Anita Blake. Jean-Claude is a French-born vampire who is over 400–600 years old. He was a favorite of Belle Morte for his eyes, and, like many vampires of Belle Morte's line, Jean-Claude was selected for his almost perfect mortal beauty. He arrived in St. Louis and, indeed, the United States itself to escape Belle Morte's court with the help of Augustine. Jean-Claude became the Master Vampire of St. Louis after Anita Blake killed Nikolaos. Together with Richard Zeeman, Jean-Claude is a member of Anita's first triumvirate. Jean-Claude's daytime lair is the sub-basement of the Circus of the Damned. As owner of the "JC Corporation," he also owns and runs Guilty Pleasures, The Laughing Corpse, and Danse Macabre, as well as other clubs.

— Freebase

Yamakasi

Yamakasi

The Yamakasi (Lingala: ya makási) are the original group of parkour practitioners from Lisses, France. The nine founding members were David Belle, Sébastien Foucan, Châu Belle Dinh, Williams Belle, Yann Hnautra, Laurent Piemontesi, Guylain N'Guba Boyeke, Malik Diouf, and Charles Perriére. Their philosophy was that parkour builds an individual who is physically, mentally, and ethically strong. The name has been used in popular references to parkour, including in French films about admirable lawbreakers who do their physically demanding deeds for charitable ends. Members of the original group have continued to appear in video reports on their history and the practice.

— Wikipedia

Grisette

Grisette

The word grisette has referred to a French working-class woman from the late 17th century and remained in common use through the Belle Époque era, albeit with some modifications to its meaning. It derives from gris, and refers to the cheap grey fabric of the dresses these women originally wore. The 1694 edition of the Dictionnaire de l'Académie française described a grisette as simply "a woman of lowly condition". By the 1835 edition of the dictionary, her status had risen somewhat. She was described as: "a young working woman who is coquettish and flirtatious." This usage can be seen in one of Oliver Wendell Holmes' early poems 'Our Yankee Girls': "the gay grisette, whose fingers touch love's thousand chords so well...". In practice, "young working woman" referred primarily to those employed in the garment and millinery trades as seamstresses or shop assistants, the few occupations open to them in 19th century urban France, apart from domestic service. The sexual connotations which had long accompanied the word are made explicit in Webster's Third New International Dictionary which lists one of its meanings as a young woman who combines part-time prostitution with another occupation. Webster's quotes an example from Henry Seidel Canby's 1943 biography of Walt Whitman:

— Freebase

Mangas

Mangas

Manges is the name of a social group in the Belle Époque era's counterculture of Greece. The nearest English equivalent to the term mangas is wide boy, or spiv. Mangas was a label for men belonging to the working class, behaving in a particularly arrogant/presumptuous way, and dressing with a very typical vesture composed of a woolen hat, a jacket, a tight belt, stripe pants, and pointy shoes. Other features of their appearance were their long moustache, their bead chaplets, and their idiosyncratic manneristic limp-walking. A related social group were the Koutsavakides; the two terms are occasionally used interchangeably. Manges are also notable for being closely associated to the history of Rebetiko.

— Freebase

Victorian era

Victorian era

The Victorian era of British history was the period of Queen Victoria's reign from 20 June 1837, until her death on 22 January 1901. It was a long period of peace, prosperity, refined sensibilities and national self-confidence for Britain. Some scholars date the beginning of the period in terms of sensibilities and political concerns to the passage of the Reform Act 1832. The era was preceded by the Georgian period and followed by the Edwardian period. The later half of the Victorian age roughly coincided with the first portion of the Belle Époque era of continental Europe and the Gilded Age of the United States. Culturally there was a transition away from the rationalism of the Georgian period and toward romanticism and mysticism with regard to religion, social values, and the arts. In international relations the era was a long period of peace, known as the Pax Britannica, and economic, colonial, and industrial consolidation, temporarily disrupted by the Crimean War in 1854. The end of the period saw the Boer War. Domestically, the agenda was increasingly liberal with a number of shifts in the direction of gradual political reform, industrial reform and the widening of the voting franchise.

— Freebase

Manon

Manon

Manon is an opéra comique in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Henri Meilhac and Philippe Gille, based on the 1731 novel L’histoire du chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut by the Abbé Prévost. It was first performed at the Opéra-Comique in Paris on January 19, 1884. Prior to Massenet's work, Halévy and Auber had used the subject for musical stage works. Massenet also wrote a one-act sequel to Manon, Le portrait de Manon, involving the Chevalier des Grieux as an older man. The composer worked at the score of Manon at his country home outside Paris and also at a house at The Hague once occupied by Prévost himself. Manon is Massenet's most popular and enduring opera and, having "quickly conquered the world's stages", it has maintained an important place in the repertory since its creation. It is the quintessential example of the charm and vitality of the music and culture of the Parisian Belle Époque.

— Freebase

belle-cousine

belle-cousine

Belle-fille d'oncle ou belle-fille de la tante ou nièce de la belle-mère ou nièce du beau-père.

— Editors Contribution

belle-grand-cousine

belle-grand-cousine

Belle-fille du grand-oncle ou belle-fille de la grand-tante ou nièce de la belle-grand-mère ou nièce du beau-grand-père.

— Editors Contribution

belle-petite-cousine

belle-petite-cousine

Belle-petite-fille d'oncle ou belle-petite-fille de la tante ou petite-nièce de la belle-mère ou petite-nièce du beau-père.

— Editors Contribution

belle-cousine deuxième

belle-cousine deuxième

Belle-petite-fille du grand-oncle ou belle-petite-fille de la grand-tante ou petite-nièce de la belle-grand-mère ou petite-nièce du beau-grand-père.

— Editors Contribution

Café-chantant

Café-chantant

Café chantant (French: lit. "singing café"), café-concert or caf’conc, is a type of musical establishment associated with the belle époque in France. Although there is much overlap of definition with cabaret, music hall, vaudeville, etc. the café chantant was originally an outdoor café where small groups of performers performed popular music for the public. The music was generally lighthearted, sometimes risqué, even bawdy but, as opposed to the cabaret tradition, not particularly political or confrontational.

— Wikipedia

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