Synonyms containing catch napping Page #7

We've found 1,106 synonyms:

Mole

Mole

mōl, n. a small animal, with very small eyes and soft fur, which burrows in the ground and casts up little heaps of mould.—v.t. to burrow or form holes in.—ns. Mole′cast; Mole′-catch′er, one whose business it is to catch moles; Mole′-crick′et, a burrowing insect like a cricket, with forelegs like those of a mole.—adj. Mole′-eyed, having eyes like those of a mole: seeing imperfectly.—ns. Mole′hill, a little hill or heap of earth cast up by a mole; Mole′rat, a rat-like animal, which burrows like a mole; Mole′skin, the skin of a mole: a superior kind of fustian, double-twilled, cropped before dyeing; Mole′-spade, a small spade used by mole-catchers; Mole′-track, the track made by a mole burrowing.—Make a mountain of a molehill, to magnify a trifling matter. [For mold-warp—A.S. molde, mould, weorpan, to warp.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sneck

Sneck

snek, n. (Scot.) the catch of a door or a lid.—v.t. to latch or shut a door.—n. Sneck′-draw′er, one who lifts the latch for thievish ends, a mean thief.—adjs. Sneck′-draw′ing, Sneck′-drawn, crafty, cunning.—interj. Sneck-up′ (Shak.), go hang! [Prob. snack, to catch.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Swoop

Swoop

swōōp, v.t. to sweep down upon: to take with a sweep: to catch while on the wing: to catch up.—v.i. to descend with a sweep.—n. the act of swooping: a seizing, as a bird on its prey. [A.S. swápan, to sweep; Ger. schweifen, to rove.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Take

Take

tāk, v.t. to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with.—v.i. to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:—pa.t. took; pa.p. tā′ken.n. quantity of fish taken or captured at one time.—ns. Take′-in, an imposition, fraud: that by which one is deceived; Take′-off, a burlesque representation of any one; Tā′ker; Tā′king, act of taking or gaining possession: a seizing: agitation, excitement: (Spens. sickness: (Shak.) witchery: malignant influence.—adj. captivating: alluring.—adv. Tā′kingly.—n. Tā′kingness, quality of being taking or attractive.—adj. Tā′ky, attractive.—Take advantage of, to employ to advantage: to make use of circumstances to the prejudice of; Take after, to follow in resemblance; Take air, to be disclosed or made public; Take breath, to stop in order to breathe, to be refreshed; Take care, care of (see Care); Take down, to reduce: to bring down from a higher place, to lower: to swallow: to pull down: to write down; Take for, to mistake; Take French leave (see French); Take from, to derogate or detract from; Take heed, to be careful; Take heed to, to attend to with care; Take in, to enclose, to embrace: to receive: to contract, to furl, as a sail: to comprehend: to accept as true: to cheat: (Shak.) to conquer; Take in hand, to undertake; Take into one's head, to be seized with a sudden notion; Take in vain, to use with unbecoming levity or profaneness; Take in with, to deceive by means of; Take it out of, to extort reparation from: to exhaust the strength or energy of; Take leave (see Leave); Taken in, deceived, cheated; Take notice, to observe: to show that observation is made: (with of) to remark upon; Take off, to remove: to swallow: to mimic or imitate; Take on, to take upon: to claim a character: (coll.) to grieve; Take orders, to receive ordination; Take order with (Bacon), to check; Take out, to remove from within: to deduct: (Shak.) to copy; Take part, to share; Take place, to happen: to prevail; Take root, to strike out roots, to live and grow, as a plant: to be established; Take the field, to begin military operations; Take the wall of, to pass on the side nearest the wall: to get the advantage of; Take to, to apply to: to resort to: to be fond of; Take to heart, to feel sensibly; Take up, to lift, to raise: (Shak.) to borrow money, to buy on credit, to make up a quarrel: to employ, occupy or fill: to arrest: to comprise; Take up arms, to commence to fight; Take upon, to assume; Take up with, to be pleased or contented with, to form a connection with, to fall in love with: to lodge; Take with, to be pleased with. [M. E. taken—Scand.; Ice. taka pa.t. tók, pa.p. tekinn); conn. with L. tangĕre, tetig-i, to touch, and with Eng. tack.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Trap

Trap

trap, n. an instrument for snaring animals: an ambush: a stratagem: a contrivance for hindering the passage of foul air from a waste-pipe, &c.: a trap-door: any rickety structure: a carriage, a vehicle: (slang) a policeman.—v.t. to catch in a trap:—pr.p. trap′ping; pa.t. and pa.p. trapped.—ns. Trap′-ball, an old game played with a ball or bat and trap; Trap′-door, a door in a floor shutting like the catch of a trap; Trap′-fall, a trap-door which gives way beneath the feet; Trap′per, one who traps animals for their fur, &c.; Trap′piness, the state of being trappy or unsafe; Trap′ping; Trap′-stair, a stair or kind of ladder surmounted by a trap-door.—adj. Trap′py, treacherous. [A.S. træppe; cog. with Old High Ger. trapa, a snare (whence Fr. trappe, by which the Eng. word has been modified).]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Trigger

Trigger

trig′ėr, n. a catch which when pulled looses the hammer of a gun in firing: a catch to hold a wheel when driving on steep ground. [Dut. trekkertrekken, to pull.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Troll

Troll

trōl, v.t. to move circularly: to sing the parts of in succession, as of a catch or round: to angle or fish for in a certain way: to fish for.—v.i. to roll: to move or run about: to sing a catch: to stroll, ramble: to fish, esp. for pike, with rod and line, using revolving lure, artificial or natural, such as spoon-bait, minnow, &c.—n. a moving round, repetition: a round song.—ns. Troll′er; Troll′ey, Troll′y, a costermonger's cart: a metallic roller or pulley used in many electric street-railways in connection with an overhead electric conductor: a small truck running in a furnace, or in mines: lace whose pattern is outlined with a thicker thread or a flat border made up of several such threads; Troll′ing; Troll′ing-bait, -spoon, a metallic revolving lure used in trolling. [O. Fr. troller, trauler (Fr. trôler), to stroll; Old High Ger. trollen, to run.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

stoop talons

stoop talons

when falcon curl up and dive down to catch prey

— Editors Contribution

trawl

trawl

A type of net used to haul or catch a large amount of fish.

— Editors Contribution

trawl

trawl

The act and processing of using a specific type of net attached to a fishing boat to catch or haul a large amount of fish.

— Editors Contribution

translusive

translusive

Hard to Catch; Beyond Grasp

— Editors Contribution

Ultra Omega Burn

Ultra Omega Burn

Ultra Omega Burn exercise is a key part of a weight loss program. You must combine diet and physical activity to experience the weight loss you desire. Many people out there will not stay with a weight loss program because the exercise is too hard and too fast. If that is you, ignore those gym gurus and do it a little on your own. Then once you have made physical activity a part of your everyday routine, then you might be able to start a strenuous exercise routine at the gym. Now to do it yourself To do easy exercise for your personal weight loss regime, here is some suggestion. The first one is the easiest; get the required amount of rest you need, and the catch is to not eat before you go to sleep. That one is very easy and you will find that by not eating at least three hours before you go to bed will make an easy gain on your weight loss goals.

— Editors Contribution

Donkeyman

Donkeyman

This story was narrated to me by a friend of mine. We had both been to sea in the Merchant Navy many years ago. How the Donkeyman went to sea. In the days of sail, cargo was worked in port by rigging the lower yards in much the same way as derricks were rigged once yards became a thing of the past. The runner was led through blocks onto the dockside and attached to team of donkeys which were walked up or walked back, by the Donkeyman to hoist the sling or lower it. With the advent of steam power the donkeys were quickly replaced with the steam engine harness to a donkey boiler, but the chap who tended he boiler was still referred as a donkeyman. It didn't take overly long for some bright individual to suggest that the boiler would be of more use if it was on the deck of the ship instead of the dockside. This was especially advantageous yet to catch up with this new technology. An added advantage for the ship owner was that the steam power generated could be used for sail, handling winches and for heaving up the anchor etc; thus saving money by cutting the number of hands required for the ship at sea. The only downside was the cargo carrying capacity lost to the coal needed to feed the boiler. Eventually the boiler and steam engine replaced sail as the main means of propulsion on all ships. Ships which were crewed only by sailors now had a black gang down below to feed the hungry boilers and their boss was the donkeyman. Steam gave way to the Diesel engine and engine room manning was greatly reduced. No longer was their any need for gangs of firemen and trimmers, only a handful of greasers, wipers, or motormen inhabitated the engine room to assist, the engineers but the senior engine room rating was still called the Donkeyman. It is still the case? One wonders.

— Editors Contribution

Glasse, Mrs.

Glasse, Mrs.

authoress, real or fictitious, of a cookery book, once in wide-spread repute; credited with the sage prescription, "First catch your hare."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Lasso

Lasso

a well-plaited strip of hide, with a noose, to catch wild horses or cattle with.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

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An antonym of "besotted"
  • A. stringent
  • B. sober
  • C. affluent
  • D. flush