Synonyms containing catch ones drift

We've found 3,052 synonyms:

Drift

Drift

drift, n. a driving: a heap of matter driven together, as snow: the direction in which a thing is driven: a slow current in the sea caused by the wind: leeway: the object aimed at: the meaning of words used: (geol.) detritus, such as broken rock, sand, gravel: (mining) a horizontal excavation or passage.—v.t. to drive into heaps, as snow.—v.i. to be floated along: to be driven into heaps.—ns. Drift′age, that which is drifted: the amount of deviation from a ship's course due to leeway; Drift′-an′chor, an anchor for keeping the ship's head to the wind; Drift′-bolt, a steel bolt used to drive out other bolts; Drift′-ice, floating masses of ice drifting before the wind; Drift′land, an old tribute paid for the privilege of driving cattle through a manor.—adj. Drift′less, without drift or aim.—ns. Drift′-min′ing, gold-mining by means of drifts in the gravel and detritus of old river-beds; Drift′-net, a net kept upright in the water by floats above and weights below; Drift′-sail, a sail immersed in the water, used for lessening the drift of a vessel during a storm; Drift′-way, a road over which cattle were driven: (min.) drift; Drift′-weed, gulf-weed: tangle; Drift′-wood, wood drifted by water.—adj. Drift′y, full of or forming drifts. [See Drive.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Catch

Catch

kach, v.t. to take hold of: to apprehend or understand: to seize after pursuit: to trap or ensnare: to take a disease by infection: to take up anything by sympathy or imitation.—v.i. to be contagious: to be entangled or fastened in anything;—pa.t. and pa.p. caught (kawt).—n. seizure: anything that seizes or holds: that which is caught: anything worth catching: a sudden advantage taken: a specially English form of musical composition, written generally in three or four parts, and in the canon form—originally synonymous with the round.—adj. Catch′able, that may be caught.—ns. Catch′er, one who catches; Catch′fly, a popular name of several plants belonging to the genus Silene, and of Lychnis Viscaria, whose glutinous stems often retain insects settling on them; Catch′ing, the action of the verb 'to catch:' a nervous or spasmodic twitching.—adj. infectious: captivating, attractive.—ns. Catch′ment-bās′in, a term applied to all that part of a river-basin from which rain is collected, and from which, therefore, the river is fed; Catch′penny, any worthless thing, esp. a publication, intended merely to gain money—also adj.; Catch′word, among actors, the last word of the preceding speaker—the cue: the word at the head of the page in a dictionary or encyclopædia: the first word of a page given at the bottom of the preceding page: any word or phrase taken up and repeated as the watchword or symbol of a party.—adj. Catch′y, attractive, deceptive, readily caught up, as an air, &c., fitful.—Catch at, to snatch at; Catch fire, to become ignited, to be inspired by passion or zeal; Catch hold of, to seize; Catch it, to get a scolding or the like; Catch me! an emphatic colloquial phrase implying that there is not the remotest possibility of my doing something suggested; Catch on, to comprehend: to catch the popular fancy; Catch out, to put a batsman out at cricket by catching the ball he has batted; Catch sight of, suddenly to get a glimpse of; Catch up, to overtake; Catch up, or away, to lay hold of forcibly. [From O. Fr. cachier—Late L. captiāre for captāre, inten. of capĕre, to take. See Chase.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Drift netting

Drift netting

Drift netting is a fishing technique where nets, called drift nets, are allowed to float freely at the surface of a sea or lake. Usually a drift net is a gill net with floats attached to a rope along the top of the net, and weights attached to another rope along the foot of the net to keep it vertical in the water. Drift nets are placed by ships and are left free-floating until retrieved. These nets usually target schools of pelagic fish. Drift nets are a type of gill net because of the tendency for the fishes' gills to get caught in the net. Traditionally drift nets were made of organic materials, such as hemp, which were biodegradable. Prior to 1950, nets tended to have a larger mesh size. The larger mesh only caught the larger fish, allowing the smaller, younger ones to slip through. When drift net fishing grew in scale during the 1950s, the industry changed to synthetic materials with smaller mesh size. Synthetic nets last longer, are odorless and nearly invisible in the water, and do not biodegrade. Drift net fishing became a commercial fishing practice because it is cost effective. Nets can be placed by low-powered vessels making it fuel efficient. Drift nets are also effective at bringing in large amounts of fish in one catch.

— Freebase

Drift pin

Drift pin

In metalworking, a drift pin, drift pin punch, or simply drift, is the name for a tool used for enlarging holes, or aligning holes prior to bolting or riveting metal parts together. A drift pin is not used as a punch in the traditional sense of the term. A drift pin is used as an aid in aligning bolt or rivet holes prior to inserting a fastener. A drift punch is constructed as a tapered rod, with the hammer acting on the large end of the taper. The tapered end of a drift punch is placed into the semi-aligned bolt holes of two separate components, and then driven into the hole. As it is driven in, the taper forces the two components into alignment, allowing for easy insertion of the fastener. Unlike most punches, force should never be applied to the tip of drift pin. Drift pins are especially useful for aligning fastener holes in structural steel members. Spud wrenches used for assembling trusses and steel beams have tapered handles to use as drift pins.

— Freebase

Catch

Catch

In baseball, a catch occurs when a fielder gains secure possession of a batted ball in flight, and maintains possession until he voluntarily or negligently releases the ball. When a catch occurs, the batter is out, and runners, once they properly tag up, may attempt to advance at risk of being tagged out. Unlike in American football and other sports, neither secure possession for a time nor for a number of steps is enough to demonstrate that a catch has occurred. A fielder may, for example, appear to catch and hold a batted ball securely, take a few more steps, collide with a wall or another player, and drop the ball. This is not a catch. Umpires signal a catch with the out signal: a fist raised into the air, often with a hammering motion; if there is doubt about it, the umpire will likely shout "That's a catch!" On a close no-catch, the umpire will signal with the safe signal, which is both arms swept to the side and extended, accompanied by the call "No catch, no catch!" with an emphasis on the word "no". The fielder must catch the ball with his hand or glove. If the fielder chooses to use his cap, protector, pocket or any other part of his uniform in getting possession, it is not a catch. Therefore, a foul ball which directly becomes lodged in the equipment of the catcher is not considered a catch and hence not a foul tip.

— Freebase

Leeway

Leeway

Leeway is the amount of drift motion to leeward of an object floating in the water caused by the component of the wind vector that is perpendicular to the object’s forward motion. The National Search and Rescue Supplement to the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue Manual defines leeway as "the movement of a search object through water caused by winds blowing against exposed surfaces". However, the resultant total motion of an object is made up of the leeway drift and the movement of the upper layer of the ocean caused by the surface currents, tidal currents and ocean currents. Objects with a greater exposure to each element will experience more leeway drift and overall movement through the water than ones with less exposure. A navigator or pilot on a vessel must adjust the ordered course to compensate for the leeway drift and more important set and drift, an all encompassing term for drift that includes the steering error of the vessel. Failure to make these adjustments during a voyage will yield poor navigational results. Bowditch's American Practical Navigator offers a comprehensive free guide to navigation principles. An object can be classified as either an active object like a ship navigating through a waterway or a passive object like a liferaft, drifting debris, or a person in the water. A passive object will experience the greatest leeway drift and it is this drift that is of utmost importance to those involved in search and rescue upon inland waterways and open oceans.

— Freebase

Drift ice

Drift ice

Drift ice is ice that floats on the surface of the water in cold regions, as opposed to fast ice, which is attached to a shore. Usually drift ice is carried along by winds and sea currents, hence its name, "drift ice". When the drift ice is driven together into a large single mass, it is called pack ice. Wind and currents can pile up ice to form ridges three to four metres high, creating obstacles difficult for powerful icebreakers to penetrate. Typically areas of pack ice are identified by high percentage of surface coverage by ice: e.g., 80-100%. An ice floe is a large piece of drift ice that might range from tens of metres to several kilometres in diameter. Wider chunks of ice are called ice fields. The two major ice packs are the Arctic ice pack and the Antarctic ice pack. In many areas such as the Baltic, drift ice is traditionally a seasonal event, appearing in winter and vanishing in warmer seasons. Seasonal ice drift in the Sea of Okhotsk by the northern coast of Hokkaidō, Japan has become a tourist attraction of this area with harsh climate, and is one of the 100 Soundscapes of Japan. The Sea of Okhotsk is the southernmost area in the Northern hemisphere where drift ice may be observed.

— Freebase

Diffusion current

Diffusion current

Diffusion Current is a current in a semiconductor caused by the diffusion of charge carriers (holes and/or electrons). This is the current which is due to the transport of charges occurring because of non-uniform concentration of charged particles in a semiconductor. The drift current, by contrast, is due to the motion of charge carriers due to the force exerted on them by an electric field. Diffusion current can be in the same or opposite direction of a drift current. The diffusion current and drift current together are described by the drift–diffusion equation.It is necessary to consider the part of diffusion current when describing many semiconductor devices. For example, the current near the depletion region of a p–n junction is dominated by the diffusion current. Inside the depletion region, both diffusion current and drift current are present. At equilibrium in a p–n junction, the forward diffusion current in the depletion region is balanced with a reverse drift current, so that the net current is zero. The diffusion constant for a doped material can be determined with the Haynes – Shockley experiment. Alternatively, if the carrier mobility is known, the diffusion coefficient may be determined from the Einstein relation on electrical mobility.

— Wikipedia

Genetic drift

Genetic drift

Genetic drift or allelic drift is the change in the frequency of a gene variant in a population due to random sampling. The alleles in the offspring are a sample of those in the parents, and chance has a role in determining whether a given individual survives and reproduces. A population's allele frequency is the fraction of the copies of one gene that share a particular form. Genetic drift may cause gene variants to disappear completely and thereby reduce genetic variation. When there are few copies of an allele, the effect of genetic drift is larger, and when there are many copies the effect is smaller. Vigorous debates occurred over the relative importance of natural selection versus neutral processes, including genetic drift. Ronald Fisher held the view that genetic drift plays at the most a minor role in evolution, and this remained the dominant view for several decades. In 1968 Motoo Kimura rekindled the debate with his neutral theory of molecular evolution, which claims that most instances where a genetic change spreads across a population are caused by genetic drift.

— Freebase

Drift velocity

Drift velocity

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains due to an electric field. It can also be referred to as axial drift velocity. In general, an electron will 'rattle around' randomly in a conductor at the Fermi velocity. An applied electric field will give this random motion a small net velocity in one direction. In a semiconductor, the two main carrier scattering mechanisms are ionized impurity scattering and lattice scattering. Because current is proportional to drift velocity, which in a resistive material is, in turn, proportional to the magnitude of an external electric field, Ohm's law can be explained in terms of drift velocity. Drift velocity is expressed in the following equations: where J is the current density, ρ is free charge density, and vavg is the drift velocity, and where μ is the electron mobility and E is the electric field.

— Freebase

Longshore drift

Longshore drift

Longshore drift consists of the transportation of sediments along a coast at an angle to the shoreline, which is dependent on prevailing wind direction, swash and backwash. This process occurs in the littoral zone, and in or within close proximity to the surf zone. The process is also known as longshore transport or littoral drift. Longshore drift is influenced by numerous aspects of the coastal system, with processes that occur within the surf zone largely influencing the deposition and erosion of sediments. Longshore currents can generate oblique breaking waves which result in longshore transport. Longshore drift can generally be defined in terms of the systems within the surf zone as seen in figure 1. This figure shows that sediment transport along the shore and surf zone is influenced by the swash, which moves the pebble up the beach at the angle of wind direction and also backwash, which moves the pebble back down the beach due to the influence of gravity. Longshore drift affects numerous sediment sizes as it works in slightly different ways depending on the sediment. Sand is largely affected by the oscillatory force of breaking waves, the motion of sediment due to the impact of breaking waves and bed shear from long shore current. Whereas because shingle beaches are much steeper than sandy ones, plunging breakers are more likely to form, causing the majority of long shore transport to occur in the swash zone, due to a lack of surf zone.

— Freebase

Fair catch

Fair catch

A fair catch is a feature of American football and several other codes of football, in which a player attempting to catch a ball kicked by the opposing team – either on a kickoff or punt – is entitled to catch the ball without interference from any member of the kicking team. A ball caught in this manner becomes dead once caught, i.e., the player catching the ball is not entitled to run with the ball in an attempt to gain yardage, and the receiving team begins their drive at the spot where the ball was caught. A player wishing to make a fair catch signals his intent by extending one arm above his head and waving it while the kicked ball is in flight. The primary reason for the fair catch rule is to protect the receiver. A receiver directs his attention toward the incoming punt and cannot focus on the defenders running towards him. He is quite vulnerable to injury and is also at risk for fumbling the kick if the punter intentionally makes a high short kick to allow defenders time to hit the receiver. The XFL removed the fair catch rule in an effort to make the game more "extreme." Canadian football and Arena football also do not have fair catch rules, with XFL and CFL preferring a five yard "no-yards" rule instead.

— Freebase

Drift

Drift

that causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud

— Webster Dictionary

Heading

Heading

a gallery, drift, or adit in a mine; also, the end of a drift or gallery; the vein above a drift

— Webster Dictionary

Drift current

Drift current

In condensed matter physics and electrochemistry, drift current is the electric current, or movement of charge carriers, which is due to the applied electric field, often stated as the electromotive force over a given distance. When an electric field is applied across a semiconductor material, a current is produced due to flow of charge carriers. The drift velocity is the average velocity of the charge carriers in the drift current. The drift velocity, and resulting current, is characterized by the mobility; for details, see electron mobility or electrical mobility.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. commonplace
  • B. well-worn
  • C. new
  • D. hackneyed