Synonyms containing deemster (Isle of Man) Page #3

We've found 10,308 synonyms:

Man catcher

Man catcher

A man catcher is an esoteric type of pole weapon which was used in Europe as late as the 18th century. It consisted of a pole mounted with a two pronged head. Each prong was semi-circular in shape with a spring-loaded "door" on the front. This created an effective valve that would allow the ring to pass around a man-sized cylinder and keep it trapped. The man catcher was used primarily to pull a person from horseback and drag them to the ground where they could be helplessly pinned. This is one of the few examples of non-lethal polearms. Man catchers played a role in the medieval custom of capturing noble opponents for ransom. The design assumes that the captured person wears armor to protect him against the metal prongs, which could easily hurt the neck of a person without armor. The man catcher was also used to trap and contain violent prisoners. In Papua New Guinea, a different weapon existed that was also identified as a man catcher. It consisted of a hoop attached to a spear - the hoop would be placed over an enemy's head to capture them, and then they could be speared in the back of the neck. Similarly, the Japanese sodegarami, tsukubō, and sasumata were used by Edo era law enforcement for apprehending suspects. However, the sasumata was most like a man catcher in usage as its forked head was designed to pin the suspect's neck, legs, arms, or joints against a wall or the ground. While other man catchers are no longer in use, the sasumata currently has modern variants that are semi-flexible, with padding, blunt endpoints, and other slightly modified geometry, designed to significantly reduce the chance of injury to restrained civilians. These variants are designed for use by non-soldiers -- specifically, they are intended for use by a Japanese riot police mounted on horseback. In such a case, the mounted riot police would typically be arranged in formation line abreast, and would use a row of raised sasumata to hold back large crowds. These mounted riot police answer to the National Police Agency. Since the outbreak of serious riots is uncommon in Japan, the modern sasumata is only used rarely. Nevertheless, the necessary training is kept up to date.

— Freebase

Service Call

Service Call

"Service Call" is a science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick. It was first published in Science Fiction Stories, July 1955. The plot centers on a man, Courtland, who one evening at his home is visited by a nervous and peculiar repairman. The repairman states he's answering a service call made from Courtland's address and wishes to repair some sort of appliance. Courtland is irritated by the disturbence. Having not made any appointment, nor having the slightest clue about the product the man wishes to service, Courtland angrily sends the man away. Shortly later, Courtland gets curious about the man. He goes back to his door to see if he is still there. There's no sign of the man save for the crumpled service order on the ground. Courtland examines the paper to discover that the company the man works for will be founded 9 years in the future. Courtland phones his colleagues with an idea. The service man returns, confused and sure he has the correct address. Courtland and his colleagues discover the man works for an authoritarian bio-technology company from an alternate future.

— Freebase

Man-to-man defense

Man-to-man defense

Man-to-man defense is a type of defensive tactic used in team sports such as American football, association football, basketball, and netball, in which each player is assigned to defend and follow the movements of a single player on offense. Often, a player guards his counterpart, but a player may be assigned to guard a different position. The strategy is not rigid however, and a player might switch assignment if needed, or leave his own assignment for a moment to double team an offensive player. The term is commonly used even in women's basketball, though the gender-neutral 'player-to-player' also has some usage. The alternative to man-to-man defense is zone defense, in which the defender is assigned a specific area of the floor, and then guards whatever offensive player enters his area. The advantage of the man-to-man defense is that it is more aggressive than the zone defense. It also allows a team's best defender to stay on a player who has to be guarded at all times. The disadvantage is that it allows the offensive team to run screens more effectively, and it leaves weaker or slower defenders more exposed. In a man-to-man defense, those defenders are generally teammates staying close to their own assigned offensive player, and thus are often not in good position to offer help should a weaker defender be eluded by the offensive player he is trying to guard.

— Freebase

Pac-Man

Pac-Man

Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and first released in Japan on May 22, 1980. It was licensed for distribution in the United States by Midway and released in October 1980. Immensely popular from its original release to the present day, Pac-Man is considered one of the classics of the medium, virtually synonymous with video games, and an icon of 1980s popular culture. Upon its release, the game—and, subsequently, Pac-Man derivatives—became a social phenomenon that sold a large amount of merchandise and also inspired, among other things, an animated television series and a top-ten hit single. When Pac-Man was released, the most popular arcade video games were space shooters, in particular Space Invaders and Asteroids. The most visible minority were sports games that were mostly derivatives of Pong. Pac-Man succeeded by creating a new genre and appealing to both genders. Pac-Man is often credited with being a landmark in video game history, and is among the most famous arcade games of all time. It is also one of the highest-grossing video games of all time, having generated more than $2.5 billion in quarters by the 1990s. The character has appeared in more than 30 officially licensed game spin-offs, as well as in numerous unauthorized clones and bootlegs. According to the Davie-Brown Index, Pac-Man has the highest brand awareness of any video game character among American consumers, recognized by 94 percent of them. Pac-Man is one of the longest running video game franchises from the golden age of video arcade games. It is part of the collection of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. and of New York's Museum of Modern Art.

— Freebase

Llaneilian

Llaneilian

Llaneilian is a village and community in the Welsh county of Anglesey. It is located in the north east of the island, 2.2 miles (3.5 km) east of Amlwch, 16.5 miles (26.6 km) north west of Menai Bridge and 12.5 miles (20.1 km) north of Llangefni. The community includes the villages of Dulas, Llaneilian, Pengorffwysfa, Cerrig Man and Penysarn, and at the 2001 census had a population of 1,192, decreasing slightly to 1,186 at the 2011 Census. The parish is crowned by its hill, Mynydd Eilian (177 metres), a HuMP, popular with walkers and ramblers (the Anglesey Coastal Path navigates most of the parish's coastline - all of which within the Anglesey Coastal Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty), and its beach, Traeth Eilian, which is popular with holidaymakers and for watersport activities. At the north easternmost point is Point Lynas, (on a clear day from the north coast of Anglesey the Isle of Man is visible with the streetlights of Douglas, Isle of Man visible on the horizon), while Ynys Dulas lies off the North East coast of the island, east of Dulas Bay.

— Wikipedia

Emerald Isle

Emerald Isle

Emerald Isle is a town in Carteret County, North Carolina, United States. It is part of the Crystal Coast and is located entirely on the Bogue Banks. The population was 3,488 at the 2000 census, but as many as 50,000 visitors inhabit the area during the summer season, filling up vacant rental properties that do not count toward official census results. Today, the oceanfront is lined with both large and small homes. While there is a scattering of condominiums, there are no oceanfront hotels, and Emerald Isle has maintained a family-oriented atmosphere. Recent beach renourishment projects in North Carolina, including Emerald Isle, have been both praised and questioned.

— Freebase

Solent

Solent

The Solent is a strait separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of England. The Solent is a major shipping route for passengers, freight and military vessels. It is an important recreational area for water sports, particularly yachting, hosting the Cowes Week sailing event annually. It is sheltered by the Isle of Wight and has a very complex tidal pattern, which has greatly benefited Southampton's success as a port. Portsmouth lies on its shores. Spithead, an area off Gilkicker Point near Gosport, is known as the place where the Royal Navy is traditionally reviewed by the monarch of the day. The area is of great ecological and landscape importance, particularly because of the coastal and estuarine habitats along the edge of the Solent. Much of its coastline is designated as a Special Area of Conservation. It is bordered by and forms a part of the character of a number of nationally important protected landscapes including the New Forest National Park, and the Isle of Wight AONB. First recorded in 731 as Soluente, Solent is "an ancient pre-English name of uncertain origin and meaning."

— Freebase

Canary Wharf

Canary Wharf

Canary Wharf is a major business district located in Tower Hamlets, London, England. It is one of London's two main financial centres – along with the traditional City of London – and contains many of the UK's tallest buildings, including the second-tallest, One Canada Square. Canary Wharf contains around 14,000,000 square feet of office and retail space, of which around 7,900,000 square feet is owned by Canary Wharf Group. Around 90,000 people work in Canary Wharf and it is home to the world or European headquarters of numerous major banks, professional services firms and media organisations including Barclays, Citigroup, Clifford Chance, Credit Suisse, Fitch Ratings, HSBC, J.P. Morgan, KPMG, MetLife, Morgan Stanley, Skadden, State Street and Thomson Reuters. Canary Wharf is located in the West India Docks on the Isle of Dogs in the Borough of Tower Hamlets in East London. The West India Docks once formed part of the busiest port in the world. After the docks were closed in 1980 the British Government adopted various policies to stimulate the redevelopment of the area, including through the creation of the London Docklands Development Corporation in 1981 and granting the Isle of Dogs Enterprise Zone status in 1982. In 1987 the Canadian company Olympia and York agreed to construct a major office development on the Isle of Dogs, with construction commencing in 1988.

— Freebase

Presque Isle

Presque Isle

Presque Isle is the commercial center and largest city in the sparsely populated Aroostook County, Maine, United States. The population was 9,692 at the 2010 census. The city is home to the University of Maine at Presque Isle, Northern Maine Community College, Northern Maine Fairgrounds, The Aroostook Centre Mall, and the Northern Maine Regional Airport. Presque Isle is the headquarters of the federally recognized tribe, the Aroostook Band of Micmac.

— Freebase

Greenworld

Greenworld

Greenworld (Japanese: グリーンワールド Hepburn: Gurīn wārudo) is a 2010 speculative evolution and science fiction book written by Scottish geologist Dougal Dixon and primarily illustrated by Dixon himself, alongside a few images by other artists. Greenworld has, unlike Dixon’s previous works on speculative evolution (After Man in 1981, The New Dinosaurs in 1988 and Man After Man in 1990), only been published in Japan, where it was released in two volumes. The book features a fictional alien planet and a diverse biosphere of alien organisms. The premise of Greenworld follows human colonisation of a planet of the same name over the course of a thousand years, chronicling mankind's disastrous impact on Greenworld's ecosystems, similar to how humans today are impacting Earth and its life. Greenworld and its creatures were designed by Dixon as a design exercise for his local science fiction group and the planet and its organisms first appeared in an 1992 episode of the Channel 4 series Equinox, followed by appearances in various other media, including the 1997 programme Natural History of an Alien. Greenworld's premise is similar to (and directly taken from) Dixon's original idea for the book Man After Man, which would have involved humans time-travelling 50 million years into the future to colonize the future ecosystem he had developed for After Man. The version of Man After Man that was eventually published, which Dixon was reluctant to be involved in, was considerably different from this idea, instead focused on future climate change through the eyes of future human descendants genetically engineered to adapt to it.

— Wikipedia

Norman Osborn

Norman Osborn

Norman Osborn is a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko, and first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man #14 (cover dated July 1964) as the original and best-known incarnation of the Green Goblin. As the amoral industrialist head of Oscorp, Norman was exposed to an experimental formula which enhanced his physical abilities and intellect, but also drove him to insanity. Having endured as Spider-Man's archenemy, Osborn has been part of the superhero's defining stories as well as being Harry Osborn, Gabriel and Sarah Stacy's father, Normie Osborn's grandfather, and the killer of Gwen Stacy, Ben Reilly and Flash Thompson. Although his primary obsession is Spider-Man, Osborn often comes into conflict with other superheroes in the Marvel Universe. As the Goblin, he adopted a Halloween-themed appearance: dressing in a goblin costume, riding on a bat-shaped "Goblin Glider", and using an arsenal of high-tech weapons, such as grenade-like "Pumpkin Bombs", to terrorize New York City. Although Osborn sometimes works with other supervillains such as Doctor Octopus and Mysterio, and groups like the Sinister Six and the Dark Avengers, these relationships often collapse due to his desire for unbridled chaos and destruction. In recent years, Osborn gained new status as a public hero as the original iteration of Iron Patriot. The character has been in various top villain lists as one of Spider-Man's greatest enemies and one of the greatest comic book villains of all time. The character's popularity has seen him appear on a variety of merchandise, inspire real-world structures (such as theme park attractions), and be referenced in a number of media. Osborn has been adapted to serve as Spider-Man's adversary in live-action, animated, and video game incarnations. The character has been portrayed in film by Willem Dafoe in Sam Raimi's Spider-Man film trilogy and Chris Cooper in the 2014 film The Amazing Spider-Man 2. Among others, Neil Ross, Alan Rachins, Steve Blum, Steven Weber and Josh Keaton provided Osborn's voice in the animated Spider-Man series of 1981, 1994, 2008, 2012 and 2017.

— Wikipedia

Iron Man 3

Iron Man 3

Iron Man 3 is a 2013 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Iron Man, produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. It is the sequel to Iron Man (2008) and Iron Man 2 (2010), and the seventh film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The film was directed by Shane Black from a screenplay he co-wrote with Drew Pearce, and stars Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark / Iron Man alongside Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Guy Pearce, Rebecca Hall, Stéphanie Szostak, James Badge Dale, Jon Favreau, and Ben Kingsley. In Iron Man 3, Tony Stark wrestles with the ramifications of the events of The Avengers during a national terrorism campaign on the United States led by the mysterious Mandarin. After the release of Iron Man 2 in May 2010, director Favreau chose not to return for a third film. Black was hired to write and direct the sequel in February 2011, working with Pearce to make the script more character-centric, focus on thriller elements, and use concepts from Warren Ellis's "Extremis" comic book story arc. The film's supporting cast, including Kingsley, Pearce, and Hall, were brought on throughout April and May 2012. Filming took place from May 23 to December 17, 2012, primarily at EUE/Screen Gems Studios in Wilmington, North Carolina. Additional filming took place around North Carolina as well as in Florida, Los Angeles, and China; an extended version of the film specifically for Chinese audiences was created. Seventeen companies provided the film's visual effects. Iron Man 3 premiered at the Grand Rex in Paris on April 14, 2013, and released in the United States on May 3, as the first film in Phase Two of the MCU. It received praise from critics for its performances, visual effects, action sequences, humor, and Brian Tyler's musical score, while critics and audiences gave a mixed reception to its Mandarin plot twist. The film was a box office success, grossing over $1.2 billion worldwide making it the second highest-grossing film of 2013 and the sixteenth film to gross over $1 billion. At the time it also became the fifth highest-grossing film of all time while its opening weekend became the sixth-highest of all time. The film received Best Visual Effects nominations at the Academy Awards and the BAFTA Awards.

— Wikipedia

Arwald

Arwald

Arwald (died 686 CE) was the last Jutish King of the Isle of Wight and last pagan king in Anglo-Saxon England until the Vikings in the 9th century. His name may have been "Arwald" or "Atwald" - Bede's script is often difficult to read. PASE has "Arwald". Nearly all that is known of him is from Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum, which describes the invasion of the Isle of Wight by Caedwalla, a Wessex King, who, with merciless slaughter, endeavoured to destroy all the island's inhabitants and replace them with his own followers. Caedwalla had also vowed to give a quarter of the Isle of Wight to St. Wilfrid and the Church. Arwald was killed in battle, but his two younger brothers escaped to the Great Ytene Forest (now called the New Forest). They were betrayed to Caedwalla and taken to a place where he "was in hiding with his wounds" at Stoneham, near Southampton. Shortly before they were put to the sword they allegedly converted to Christianity by the intervention of Abbot Cynibert of Hreutford, being described by Bede as "the first fruits" of the massacre because of this conversion. Thus canonised, their names are unknown, but they are called collectively "St. Arwald"- after their brother. Arwald's unnamed sister survived, as the wife of the king of Kent. She is a direct ancestor of Alfred the Great. St. Arwald's Day is 22 April.

— Wikipedia

Lamlash

Lamlash

Lamlash (Scottish Gaelic: An t-Eilean Àrd) is the largest village by population on the Isle of Arran, in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland. It lies 3 miles (5 km) to the south of ferry port Brodick, in a sheltered bay on the island's east coast, facing the Holy Isle. Lamlash is the seat of Arran's local government offices, and is also the location of the island's only police station, secondary school and hospital. In common with the rest of the island, the village's main industry is tourism, and the public sector is also an important employer. Although the Clyde was once the finest fishery in Europe it is now all but gone. There are strictly speaking no fish left in the Clyde for commercial capture. Lamlash has an RNLI Lifeboat station with a B class Atlantic 75 lifeboat, covering the inshore waters around the coast of Arran, and in summer, there is a regular ferry service from Lamlash harbour to Holy Isle. The village has several buildings of historical interest, including Hamilton Terrace, which consists of two rows of idyllic single storey-and-attic cottages on the Lamlash seafront, arranged in pairs.

— Wikipedia

Duver

Duver

A duver (pronounced to rhyme with Hoover; occasionally spelt as dover) is an Isle of Wight dialect term for an area of sand dunes. The name has become part of place names on the Isle of Wight, for example Dover Street in Ryde is the street which used to run down to the duver. The word survives in the names of coastal areas at St Helens Duver and Seaview Duver. There are relatively few dunes on the Isle of Wight, and some have been reclaimed or otherwise lost, meaning that some places which bear the name duver are no longer sand dunes. The largest surviving example is St Helens Duver.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. hackneyed
  • B. new
  • C. well-worn
  • D. commonplace