Synonyms containing embarkation and tonnage table

We've found 364,857 synonyms:

Gross tonnage

Gross tonnage

Gross tonnage is a unitless index related to a ship's overall internal volume. Gross tonnage is different from gross register tonnage. Neither gross tonnage nor gross register tonnage is a measure of the ship's displacement and should not be confused with terms such as deadweight tonnage or displacement. Gross tonnage, along with net tonnage, was defined by The International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969, adopted by the International Maritime Organization in 1969, and came into force on July 18, 1982. These two measurements replaced gross register tonnage and net register tonnage. Gross tonnage is calculated based on "the moulded volume of all enclosed spaces of the ship" and is used to determine things such as a ship's manning regulations, safety rules, registration fees, and port dues, whereas the older gross register tonnage is a measure of the volume of certain enclosed spaces.

— Freebase

Net tonnage

Net tonnage

Net tonnage is a dimensionless index calculated from the total moulded volume of the ship's cargo spaces by using a mathematical formula. Defined in The International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships that was adopted by the International Maritime Organization in 1969, the net tonnage replaced the earlier net register tonnage which denoted the volume of the ship's revenue-earning spaces in "register tons", units of volume equal to 100 cubic feet. Net tonnage is used to calculate the port duties and should not be taken as less than 30 per cent of the ship's gross tonnage. Net tonnage is not a measure of the weight of the ship or its cargo, and should not be confused with terms such as deadweight tonnage or displacement. Also, unlike the net register tonnage, the net tonnage is unitless and thus can not be defined as "tons" or "net tons".

— Freebase

Net register tonnage

Net register tonnage

Net register tonnage (NRT, nrt, n.r.t.) is a ship's cargo volume capacity expressed in "register tons", one of which equals to a volume of 100 cubic feet (2.83 m3). It is calculated by subtracting non-revenue-earning spaces i.e. spaces not available for carrying cargo, for example engine rooms, fuel tanks and crew quarters, from the ship's gross register tonnage. Net register tonnage is not a measure of the weight of the ship or its cargo, and should not be confused with terms such as deadweight tonnage or displacement. Gross and net register tonnages were replaced by gross tonnage and net tonnage, respectively, when the International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted The International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships on 23 June 1969. The new tonnage regulations entered into force for all new ships on 18 July 1982, but existing vessels were given a migration period of 12 years to ensure that ships were given reasonable economic safeguards, since port and other dues are charged according to ship's tonnage. Since 18 July 1994 the gross and net tonnages, dimensionless indices calculated from the total moulded volume of the ship and its cargo spaces by mathematical formulae, have been the only official measures of the ship's tonnage. However, the gross and net register tonnages are still widely used in describing older ships.

— Wikipedia

Table

Table

tā′bl, n. a smooth, flat slab or board, with legs, used as an article of furniture: supply of food, entertainment: the company at a table: the board or table on which a game is played, as billiards, backgammon, draughts: a surface on which something is written or engraved: that which is cut or written on a flat surface: a flat gravestone supported on pillars: an inscription: a condensed statement: syllabus or index; (B.) a writing tablet.—adj. of or pertaining to a table, or the food partaken from the table.—v.t. to make into a table or catalogue: to lay (money) on the table: to pay down: to lay on the table—i.e. to postpone consideration of.—ns. Tā′ble-beer, light beer for common use; Tā′ble-book, a book of tablets, on which anything is written without ink: a note-book: a book of tables, as of weights, measures, &c.; Tā′ble-cloth, a cloth usually of linen, for covering a table, esp. at meals; Tā′ble-cov′er, a cloth for covering a table, esp. at other than meal-times; Table-d'hôte (ta′bl-dōt), a meal for several persons at the same hour and at fixed prices; Tā′bleful, as many as a table will hold; Tā′bleland, an extensive region of elevated land with a plain-like or undulating surface: a plateau; Tā′ble-leaf, a board at the side of a table which can be put up or down to vary the size of the table; Tā′ble-lin′en, linen table-cloths, napkins, &c.; Tā′ble-mon′ey, an allowance granted to general officers in the army, and flag-officers in the navy, to enable them to fulfil the duties of hospitality within their respective commands; Tā′ble-rap′ping, production of raps on tables by alleged spiritual agency.—n.pl. Tā′bles, the game of backgammon.—ns. Tā′ble-spoon, one of the largest spoons used at table; Tā′ble-spoon′ful, as much as will fill a table-spoon; Tā′ble-talk, familiar conversation, as that round a table, during and after meals; Tā′ble-turn′ing, movements of tables or other objects, attributed by spiritualists to the agency of spirits—by rational persons to involuntary muscular action—similarly Tā′ble-lift′ing, Tā′ble-rap′ping; Tā′ble-ware, dishes, spoons, knives, forks, &c. for table use.—adv. Tā′blewise, like a table—of the communion-table, with the ends east and west—opp. to Altar-wise.—ns. Tā′ble-work, the setting of type for tables, columns of figures, &c.; Tā′bling, the act of tabling or forming into tables: (carp.) a rude dove-tailing: (naut.) a broad hem on the skirts of sails.—The Lord's Table, the table at which the Lord's Supper is partaken, or on which the elements are laid: the Lord's Supper.—Fence the tables (see Fence); Lay on the table, to lay aside any proposed measure indefinitely, or for future discussion; Lie on the table, to be laid upon the table; Turn the tables, to bring about a complete rever

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tonnage tax

Tonnage tax

A tonnage tax is a taxation mechanism that can be applied to shipping companies. The tax is determined by the Net tonnage of the entire fleet of vessels under operation or use by a company. It is on the basis of this variable that taxation is applied. Given that the tax perceived is independent from the volume of material transported and from the operating profit of a shipping company, it is less complex to manage for tax authorities and shipping companies. This method of taxation is based on an objectively measurable variable - net tonnage - by independent certifying bodies that determine the transport capacity of the vessels. Under current international practice, tonnage tax regimes are used to incentivise the modernisation and improved environmental performance of merchant fleets. The first country to introduce a tonnage tax was Greece back in 1975. Today, tonnage tax rules are applied in many countries, including 18 EU countries. The latest tonnage tax regime to have received the approval of the European Commission is the Maltese tonnage tax scheme on 19 December 2017.

— Wikipedia

Gross register tonnage

Gross register tonnage

Gross register tonnage (GRT, grt, g.r.t., gt) or gross registered tonnage, is a ship's total internal volume expressed in "register tons", each of which is equal to 100 cubic feet (2.83 m3). Gross register tonnage uses the total permanently enclosed capacity of the vessel as its basis for volume. Typically this is used for dockage fees, canal transit fees, and similar purposes where it is appropriate to charge based on the size of the entire vessel. Net register tonnage subtracts the volume of spaces not available for carrying cargo, such as engine rooms, fuel tanks and crew quarters, from gross register tonnage.Gross register tonnage is not a measure of the ship's weight or displacement and should not be confused with terms such as deadweight tonnage or displacement.

— Wikipedia

Foreign key

Foreign key

In the context of relational databases, a foreign key is a field in one table that uniquely identifies a row of another table. In other words, a foreign key is a column or a combination of columns that is used to establish and enforce a link between the data in two tables. For example, consider a database with two tables, a CUSTOMER table that includes all customer data and an ORDER table that includes all customer orders. Suppose that the business requires that each order must refer to a single customer. To reflect this in the database, the primary key in the CUSTOMER table is added to the ORDER table, where it is called a foreign key. Since CUSTOMERID in the ORDER table uniquely identifies a row of the CUSTOMER table, it says which customer placed the order. The table containing the foreign key is called the referencing or child table and the table containing the candidate key is called the referenced or parent table. Since the purpose of the foreign key in the referencing table is to identify a row of the referenced table, the value of the foreign key must be equal to the candidate key's value in some row of the primary table or else have no value, i.e., the NULL value. This rule is called a referential integrity constraint between the two tables. Because violations of referential integrity constraints can be the source of many database problems, most database management systems enforce referential integrity constraints, providing mechanisms to ensure that every non-null foreign key corresponds to a row of the referenced table.

— Freebase

Pay table

Pay table

A pay table is the name for the list of payouts on a slot machine or video poker machine. The table shows for each combination of symbols and the number of coins bet how many coins (or credits) the bettor will win. The pay table feature of the slot machine displays all possible winning sequences for that specific slot game. On older machines and some newer reel machines, the pay table is listed on the face of the machine, usually above and below the area containing the wheels. Other video machines display the pay table when the player presses a "pay table" button or touches "pay table" on the screen. These tables list the number of credits the player will receive if the symbols listed on the pay table line up on the payline of the machine. The pay table details where the symbols must be for the bettor to be paid. In general, the symbols must be centered directly under the payline on the machine. Video slot machines generally will only display the payline for lines that are winners. A payline is a line (straight or zig-zagged) that crosses one symbol on each reel of a slot machine, or the combination of symbols on the slot machine reels that the player is paid out for if he has made a bet on that combination. To be winning, any combination on the reels must have at least two identical symbols in a row, and the first one must occur on the first reel unless otherwise stated. In any other case, the combination doesn't pay out.Some machines offer symbols that are 'wild' and will pay if they are visible in any position, even if they are not on the payline. These wild symbols may also count for any other symbol on the pay table.

— Wikipedia

Tonnage

Tonnage

Tonnage is a measure of the size or cargo carrying capacity of a ship. The term derives from the taxation paid on tuns or casks of wine, and was later used in reference to the weight of a ship's cargo; however, in modern maritime usage, "tonnage" specifically refers to a calculation of the volume or cargo volume of a ship. Tonnage should not be confused with Displacement which refers to the loaded or empty weight of the vessel itself. Measurement of tonnage can be less than straightforward, not least because it is used to assess fees on commercial shipping.

— Freebase

Life table

Life table

In actuarial science and demography, a life table (also called a mortality table or actuarial table) is a table which shows, for each age, what the probability is that a person of that age will die before his or her next birthday ("probability of death"). In other words, it represents the survivorship of people from a certain population. They can also be explained as a long-term mathematical way to measure a population's longevity. Tables have been created by demographers including Graunt, Reed and Merrell, Keyfitz, and Greville.There are two types of life tables used in actuarial science. The period life table represents mortality rates during a specific time period of a certain population. A cohort life table, often referred to as a generation life table, is used to represent the overall mortality rates of a certain population's entire lifetime. They must have had to be born during the same specific time interval. A cohort life table is more frequently used because it is able to make a prediction of any expected changes in mortality rates of a population in the future. This type of table also analyzes patterns in mortality rates that can be observed over time. Both of these types of life tables are created based on an actual population from the present, as well as an educated prediction of the experience of a population in the near future. In order to find the true life expectancy average, 100 years would need to pass and by then finding that data would be of no use as healthcare is continually advancing.Other life tables in historical demography may be based on historical records, although these often undercount infants and understate infant mortality, on comparison with other regions with better records, and on mathematical adjustments for varying mortality levels and life expectancies at birth.From this starting point, a number of inferences can be derived. The probability of surviving any particular year of age The remaining life expectancy for people at different agesLife tables are also used extensively in biology and epidemiology. An area that uses this tool is Social Security. It examines the mortality rates of all the people who have Social Security to decide which actions to take.The concept is also of importance in product life cycle management.

— Wikipedia

Periodic Table

Periodic Table

The periodic table is a tabular arrangement of the chemical elements, organized on the basis of their atomic numbers, electron configurations, and recurring chemical properties. Elements are presented in order of increasing atomic number. The standard form of the table comprises an 18-column-by-7-row main grid of elements, with a double row of elements below. The table can also be deconstructed into four rectangular blocks: the s-block to the left, the p-block to the right, the d-block in the middle, and the f-block below that. The rows of the table are called periods; the columns are called groups, with some of these having names such as halogens or noble gases. Since, by definition, a periodic table incorporates recurring trends, any such table can be used to derive relationships between the properties of the elements and predict the properties of new, yet to be discovered or synthesized, elements. As a result, a periodic table—whether in the standard form or some other variant—provides a useful framework for analyzing chemical behavior, and such tables are widely used in chemistry and other sciences. Although precursors exist, Dmitri Mendeleev is generally credited with the publication, in 1869, of the first widely recognized periodic table. He developed his table to illustrate periodic trends in the properties of the then-known elements. Mendeleev also predicted some properties of then-unknown elements that would be expected to fill gaps in this table. Most of his predictions were proved correct when the elements in question were subsequently discovered. Mendeleev's periodic table has since been expanded and refined with the discovery or synthesis of further new elements and the development of new theoretical models to explain chemical behavior.

— Freebase

Billiard room

Billiard room

A billiard room is a recreation room, such as in a house or recreation center, with a billiards, pool or snooker table. A one-table billiard room requires enough space around the table to accommodate the range of a stroke of the cue from all angles, while also accounting for chairs, the storage rack and any other furniture that is or will be present. Optimally, there should be at least 6 ft of clearance between the table and any walls, furniture or other objects, on all sides and at all corners of the table. The table size is really a measure of the bed of the table, and does not include the rails which are typically around 6 inches wide. The typical cue is a bit shorter than 5 ft long, and many shots need 6 in. or more of forearm-swinging room, totaling around 6 ft of space. Examples of optimum minimum free space dimensions for common table sizes, using this logic: ⁕For a 7 ft by 3.5 ft bar/tavern-style table for pool, the space needed to enclose the table is approximately 17 ft by 15.5 ft.

— Freebase

Writing table

Writing table

A writing table has a series of drawers directly under the surface of the table, to contain writing implements, so that it may serve as a desk. Antique versions have the usual divisions for the inkwell, the blotter and the sand or powder tray in one of the drawers, and a surface covered with leather or some other material less hostile to the quill or the fountain pen than simple hard wood. In form, a writing table is a pedestal desk without the pedestals, having legs instead to hold it up. This is why such tables are sometimes called leg desks. The writing table is often called a "bureau plat" when it is done in a French style such as Louis XVI, Art Nouveau, etc. When a writing table is supported by two legs instead of four, it is usually called a trestle desk. The writing table is also sometimes called a library table, because it was often placed in a rich individual's library. This was the room in a house where a gentleman would keep literature and also do his business transactions. The library often housed, in addition, a round desk called a rent table and sometimes a drawing table. The term library table is sometimes applied indiscriminately to a wide variety of desk forms, in addition to being used for writing tables. Let the scholar or the buyer be wary.

— Freebase

Tonnage and Poundage

Tonnage and Poundage

Tonnage and Poundage were certain duties and taxes first levied in Edward II's reign on every tun of imported wine, which came mostly from Spain and Portugal, and on every pound weight of merchandise exported or imported. Traditionally tonnage and poundage was granted by Parliament to the king for life up until the reign of Charles I. Tonnage and poundage were swept away by the Customs Consolidation Act of 1787.

— Freebase

Second normal form

Second normal form

Second normal form is a normal form used in database normalization. 2NF was originally defined by E.F. Codd in 1971. A table that is in first normal form must meet additional criteria if it is to qualify for second normal form. Specifically: a table is in 2NF if and only if it is in 1NF and no non-prime attribute is dependent on any proper subset of any candidate key of the table. A non-prime attribute of a table is an attribute that is not a part of any candidate key of the table. Put simply, a table is in 2NF if and only if it is in 1NF and every non-prime attribute of the table is dependent on the whole of a candidate key. Note that when a 1NF table has no composite candidate keys, the table is automatically in 2NF.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. secular
  • B. reclusive
  • C. secluded
  • D. cloistral