Synonyms containing gauge-rod

We've found 1,691 synonyms:

American wire gauge

American wire gauge

American wire gauge, also known as the Brown & Sharpe wire gauge, is a standardized wire gauge system used since 1857 predominantly in the United States and Canada for the diameters of round, solid, nonferrous, electrically conducting wire. The cross-sectional area of each gauge is an important factor for determining its current-carrying capacity. The steel industry does not use AWG and prefers a number of other wire gauges. These include Washburn & Moen Wire Gauge, US Steel Wire Gauge, and Music Wire Gauge. Increasing gauge numbers give decreasing wire diameters, which is similar to many other non-metric gauging systems. This gauge system originated in the number of drawing operations used to produce a given gauge of wire. Very fine wire required more passes through the drawing dies than did 0 gauge wire. Manufacturers of wire formerly had proprietary wire gauge systems; the development of standardized wire gauges rationalized selection of wire for a particular purpose. The AWG tables are for a single, solid, round conductor. The AWG of a stranded wire is determined by the total cross-sectional area of the conductor, which determines its current-carrying capacity and electrical resistance. Because there are also small gaps between the strands, a stranded wire will always have a slightly larger overall diameter than a solid wire with the same AWG.

— Freebase

Hot Rod Lincoln

Hot Rod Lincoln

"Hot Rod Lincoln" is a song by American singer-songwriter Charlie Ryan, first released in 1955. It was written as an answer song to Arkie Shibley's 1950 hit "Hot Rod Race" which describes a race in San Pedro, Los Angeles between two hot rod cars, a Ford and a Mercury, which stay neck-and-neck until both are overtaken by "a kid in a hopped-up Model A". "Hot Rod Lincoln" is sung from the perspective of this third driver, whose own hot rod is a Ford Model A body with a Lincoln V8, overdrive, a four-barrel carburetor, 4:11 gear ratio, and safety tubes. Ryan's original rockabilly version of the song was released in 1955 through Souvenir Records under the artist name Charley Ryan and the Livingston Bros. A second version was released in 1959 through Four Star Records, credited to Charlie Ryan and the Timberline Riders. Ryan based the description of the eponymous car on his own hot rod, built from a 1948 12-cylinder Lincoln chassis shortened two feet, with a 1930 Ford Model A body fitted to it. Ryan raced his hot rod against a Cadillac sedan driven by a friend in Lewiston, Idaho, driving up the Spiral Highway (former U.S. Route 95 in Idaho) to the top of Lewiston Hill; he incorporated elements from this race in his lyrics to "Hot Rod Lincoln", but changed the setting to Grapevine Hill (a long, nearly straight grade up Grapevine Canyon to Tejon Pass, near the town of Gorman, California) to fit it within the narrative of "Hot Rod Race".Another version of "Hot Rod Lincoln" was recorded by country musician Johnny Bond and released in 1960 through Republic Records, with Bond's lyrics changing the hot rod's engine from a V12 to a V8. Bond released a sequel in the same year called "X-15", set in 1997, about an air race in an X-15 plane.

— Wikipedia

Rod

Rod

rod, n. a long twig: a slender stick: anything long and slender, as a magic rod, a lightning-rod, a fishing-rod, &c.: an instrument of correction: an emblem of power or authority: a pole or perch (5½ yards, or 16½ feet)—the square rod, generally called rood, is employed in estimating masonry-work, and contains 16½ × 16½, or 272¼ sq. feet: (fig.) punishment: authority: oppression: (B.) race or tribe: one of the layers of rods composing the retina of the eye: any bar connecting parts of a machine.—v.t. to furnish with rods, esp. lightning-rods.—ns. Rod′-fish′er; Rod′-fish′ing, fly-fishing: angling; Rod′-line, a fishing-line not wound on a reel; Rod′-machine′, in wood-working, a machine for cutting cylindrical sticks such as broom-handles; Rod′-ring, one of the rings along a fishing-rod through which the line runs; Rod′ster, an angler.—Napier's rods (see Napierian). [A.S. ród; Dut. roede, Ger. ruthe; L. rudis.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

rod

rod

An implement held vertically and viewed through an optical surveying instrument such as a transit, used to measure distance in land surveying and construction layout; an engineer's rod, surveyor's rod, leveling rod, ranging rod. The modern engineer's or surveyor's rod commonly is eight or ten feet long and often designed to extend higher. In former times a surveyor's rod often was a single wooden pole or composed of multiple sectioned and socketed pieces, and besides serving as a sighting target was used to measure distance on the ground horizontally, hence for convenience was of one rod or pole in length, that is, 5½ yards.

— Wiktionary

Height gauge

Height gauge

A height gauge is a measuring device used for determining the height of objects, and for marking of items to be worked on. These measuring tools are used in metalworking or metrology to either set or measure vertical distances; the pointer is sharpened to allow it to act as a scriber and assist in marking out work pieces. Devices similar in concept, with lower resolutions, are used in health care settings (health clinics, surgeries) to find the height of people, in which context they are called stadiometers. Height gauges may also be used to measure the height of an object by using the underside of the scriber as the datum. The datum may be permanently fixed or the height gauge may have provision to adjust the scale, this is done by sliding the scale vertically along the body of the height gauge by turning a fine feed screw at the top of the gauge; then with the scriber set to the same level as the base, the scale can be matched to it. This adjustment allows different scribers or probes to be used, as well as adjusting for any errors in a damaged or resharpened probe. In the toolroom, the distinction between a height gauge and a surface gauge is that a height gauge has a measuring head (whether vernier, fine rack and pinion with dial, or linear encoder with digital display), whereas a surface gauge has only a scriber point. Both are typically used on a surface plate and have a heavy base with an accurately flat, smooth underside.

— Wikipedia

Russian gauge

Russian gauge

In railway terminology, Russian gauge refers to railway track with a gauge between 1,520 mm and 1,524 mm. In a narrow sense as defined by Russian Railways it refers to 1,520 mm gauge. The primary installed base of Russian gauge is across the states of the former Soviet Union, also Mongolia and Finland, representing ca. 225,000 km of track. The Russian gauge is the second most widely used gauge in the world—after 1,435 mm. Comparatively short sections of Russian-gauge railways also extend beyond the borders of the former USSR, Mongolia and Finland into Poland, eastern Slovakia, Sweden, and northern Afghanistan. There is an approximately 150 km long section in Hungary in the Záhony logistics area close to the Ukrainian border.

— Freebase

Track gauge

Track gauge

In rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue. As the dominant parameter determining interoperability, it is still frequently used as a descriptor of a route or network. There is a distinction between the nominal gauge and actual gauge at some locality, due to divergence of track components from the nominal. Railway engineers use a device, like a caliper, to measure the actual gauge, and this device is also referred to as a track gauge.

— Freebase

Gauge

Gauge

Gage, gāj, n. a measuring-rod: a standard of measure: estimate.—v.t. to measure the contents of any vessel: to estimate ability.—adj. Gauge′able, capable of being gauged.—ns. Gaug′er, an excise officer whose business is to gauge or measure the contents of casks; Gaug′ing, the art of measuring casks containing excisable liquors; Gaug′ing-rod, an instrument for measuring the contents of casks; Broad′-, Narr′ow-gauge, in railroad construction, a distance between the rails greater or less than 56½ inches, called standard gauge. [O. Fr. gauge (Fr. jauge), gauger; prob. related to jale, bowl, to galon, gallon, or to jalon, measuring stake.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Connecting rod

Connecting rod

A connecting rod is a rigid member which connects a piston to a crank or crankshaft in a reciprocating engine. Together with the crank, it forms a simple mechanism that converts reciprocating motion into rotating motion. A connecting rod may also convert rotating motion into reciprocating motion, its original use. Earlier mechanisms, such as the chain, could only impart pulling motion. Being rigid, a connecting rod may transmit either push or pull, allowing the rod to rotate the crank through both halves of a revolution. In a few two-stroke engines the connecting rod is only required to push.Today, the connecting rod is best known through its use in internal combustion piston engines, such as automobile engines. These are of a distinctly different design from earlier forms of connecting rod used in steam engines and steam locomotives.

— Wikipedia

Sucker rod

Sucker rod

A sucker rod is a steel rod, typically between 25 and 30 feet (7 to 9 meters) in length, and threaded at both ends, used in the oil industry to join together the surface and downhole components of a reciprocating piston pump installed in an oil well. The pumpjack is the visible above-ground drive for the well pump, and is connected to the downhole pump at the bottom of the well by a series of interconnected sucker rods. Sucker rods are also commonly available made of fiberglass in 37 1/2 foot lengths and diameters of 3/4, 7/8, 1, and 1 1/4 inch. These are terminated in metallic threaded ends, female at one end and male at the other. The surface unit transfers energy for pumping the well from the prime-mover to the sucker rod string. In doing this, it must change the rotary motion of the prime-mover to reciprocating motion for the sucker rod. And it must reduce the speed of the prime-mover to a suitable pumping speed. Speed reduction is accomplished by using a gear reducer, and rotary motion of the crank shaft is converted to oscillatory motion by means of a walking beam. The crank arm is connected to the walking beam by means of a pitman arm. The walking beam is supported by a Samson post and saddle bearing. The horse head and bridle are used to ensure that the pull on the sucker rod string is vertical all times so that no bearing movement is applied to that part of sucker rod string above stuffing box. The polished rod and stuffing box combination is used to maintain a good liquid seal at the surface.

— Wikipedia

Structure gauge

Structure gauge

The structure gauge, also called the minimum clearance outline, is the minimum height and width of tunnels and bridges as well as the minimum height and width of the doors that allow a rail siding access into a warehouse. In addition, the term may apply to the minimum distance to railway platforms (passenger or freight), buildings, electrical equipment boxes, railway signal equipment, third rails or to supports for overhead lines from the track. The width of a narrow cut can also affect the maximum loading gauge. The difference between the structure gauge and the loading gauge is called the "clearance". The amount of clearance between the loading gauge and the structure gauge depends on the speed of the train, due to the train wobbling, so a train may be able to get past a restricted clearance by travelling at slow speed. The term can also be applied to the minimum size of road tunnels, overpasses and bridges, as well as doors into automobile repair shops, bus garages, filling stations, residential garages, multi-storey car parks and warehouses.

— Wikipedia

Depth gauge

Depth gauge

A depth gauge is a pressure gauge that displays the equivalent depth in water. It is a piece of diving equipment often used by SCUBA divers. Most modern diving depth gauges have an electronic mechanism and digital display. Older types used a mechanical mechanism and analogue display. A diver uses a depth gauge with decompression tables and a watch to avoid decompression sickness. A common alternative to the depth gauge, watch and decompression tables is a dive computer. A depth gauge and an oxygen analyser/oxygen sensor can be used to measure the partial pressure of oxygen of the breathing gas, which is necessary to avoid oxygen toxicity. Digital depth gauges commonly also include a timer showing the interval of time that the diver has been submerged. Some show the diver's rate of ascent and descent, which can be is useful for avoiding barotrauma. As the gauge only measures water pressure, there is an inherent inaccuracy in the depth displayed by gauges that are used in both fresh water and seawater due to the difference in the densities of fresh water and seawater.

— Freebase

en-Gauge

en-Gauge

en-Gauge technology makes people safer. They produce monitoring solutions for safety equipment that results in lower costs and increased life safety. There solutions keep schools, government and private organizations compliant with codes and ready to respond to emergencies, all while optimizing management time and resources. en-Gauge insures inspections are always done and equipment is where you need it, when you need it. Whether your needs are fire, security or health care, en-Gauge can help. en-Gauge has deployed its patented monitoring system in airports, hospitals college campuses, businesses and government facilities throughout the globe.

— CrunchBase

Rod

Rod

Rod is a Slavic deity, often mentioned in the Old Church Slavonic didactic literature which was directed against pagans. According to some researchers, Rod was the Common Slavonic god, the creator of all life and of existence itself. Rod and Rožanica were first mentioned in the Slavic translation of The Word about Idol, where their names indicate the Mother Goddess and her divine Son. Translated from the Russian language, the word Rožanica means "a woman about to give birth". Rod was, however, not always explicitly called a deity by the ancient sources. According to Leo Klejn, Rod was a spirit, demon, or a sort of supernatural being and but not of the highest level of power. Rod is absent in the pantheon of the great prince Vladimir I of Kiev. By contrast, in Neopagan traditions, Rod is often considered to be the supreme god and the creator of all life and existence.

— Freebase

Center gauge

Center gauge

Center gauges and fishtail gauges are gauges used in lathe work for checking the angles when grinding the profiles of single-point screw-cutting tool bits and centers. In the image, the gauge on the left is called a fishtail gauge or center gauge, and the one on the right is another style of center gauge. These gauges are most commonly used when hand-grinding threading tool bits on a bench grinder, although they may be used with tool and cutter grinders. When the tool bit has been ground to the correct angle, they are then be used to set the tool perpendicular to the workpiece. They can incorporate a range of sizes and types on the one gauge, the two most common being metric or UNC and UNF at 60°, and BSW at 55°. Gauges also exist for the Acme thread form.

— Wikipedia

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A synonym of "dry"
  • A. sodden
  • B. drippy
  • C. juiceless
  • D. steamy