Synonyms containing go into abstinence

We've found 44,545 synonyms:

Abstinence

Abstinence

Abstinence is a self-enforced restraint from indulging in bodily activities that are widely experienced as giving pleasure. Most frequently, the term refers to sexual abstinence, or abstinence from alcohol or food. The practice can arise from religious prohibitions and practical considerations. Abstinence may also refer to drugs. For example you can abstain from smoking. Abstinence has diverse forms. Commonly it refers to a temporary or partial abstinence from food, as in fasting. In the twelve-step program of Overeaters Anonymous abstinence is the term for refraining from compulsive eating, akin in meaning to sobriety for alcoholics. Because the regimen is intended to be a conscious act, freely chosen to enhance life, abstinence is sometimes distinguished from the psychological mechanism of repression. The latter is an unconscious state, having unhealthy consequences. Freud termed the channeling of sexual energies into other more culturally or socially acceptable activities, "sublimation".

— Freebase

Purity ring

Purity ring

Purity rings are worn as a sign of chastity. The practice originated in the United States in the 1990s among Christian-affiliated sexual abstinence groups. Wearing a purity ring is typically accompanied by a religious vow to practice abstinence until marriage. David Bario of the Columbia News Service wrote: Under the Bush administration, organizations that promote abstinence and encourage teens to sign virginity pledges or wear purity rings have received federal grants. The Silver Ring Thing, a subsidiary of a Pennsylvania evangelical church, has received more than $1 million from the government to promote abstinence and to sell its rings in the United States and abroad.

— Freebase

Good Templars

Good Templars

a total abstinence fraternity organised in New York in 1851, which has lodges, subordinate, district, and grand, now all over the world; they exact a pledge of lifelong abstinence, and advocate the suppression of the vice by statute; there is a juvenile section pledged to abstinence from tobacco, gambling, and bad language, as well as drink.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Fast

Fast

fast, v.i. to keep from food: to go hungry: to abstain from food in whole or part, as a religious duty.—n. abstinence from food: special abstinence enjoined by the church: the day or time of fasting.—ns. Fast′-day, a day of religious fasting: (Scot.) a day for humiliation and prayer, esp. before celebrations of the Lord's Supper; Fast′ens, short for Fastens-eve (Scot. Fasten-e'en and Fastern's-e'en), Fastens Tuesday, Shrove Tuesday; Fast′er, one who fasts: Fast′ing, religious abstinence. [A.S. f├Žstan, to fast; Ger. fasten, to keep: perh. allied with fast, firm, in the sense of making strict.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sobriety

Sobriety

Sobriety is the condition of not having any measurable levels, or effects from mood-altering drugs. According to WHO "Lexicon of alcohol and drug terms...", sobriety is continued abstinence from psychoactive drug use. Sobriety is also considered to be the natural state of a human being given at a birth. In a treatment setting, sobriety is the achieved goal of independence from consuming or craving mind-altering substances. As such, sustained abstinence is a prerequisite for sobriety. Early in abstinence, residual effects of mind-altering substances can preclude sobriety. These effects are labeled "PAWS", or "post acute withdrawal syndrome". Someone who abstains, but has a latent desire to resume use, is not considered truly sober. An abstainer may be subconsciously motivated to resume drug use, but for a variety of reasons, abstains. Sobriety has more specific meanings within specific contexts, such as the culture of Alcoholics Anonymous, other 12 step programs, law enforcement, and some schools of psychology. In some cases, sobriety implies achieving "life balance."

— Freebase

plunged

plunged

to (cause someone or something to) move or fall suddenly and often a long way forward, down, or into something;to become lower in value or level very suddenly and quickly;a sudden movement or fall forward, down, or into something;a sudden and large fall in value or level;to move or fall suddenly forward, down, or into something;If a value or price plunges, it suddenly becomes less;If a person or group plunges into an activity, or a place plunges into a condition, it suddenly experiences it;If you plunge into an activity or are plunged into it, you suddenly get very involved in it.If a person or thing is plunged into a particular state or situation, or if they plunge into it, they are suddenly in that state or situation.If you plunge an object into something, you push it quickly or violently into it.to fall quickly from a high position:To move, or to move something downwards:fall,lower,come down;to make someone or something fall quickly from a high position;to slope downwards suddenly; if an amount or level plunges, it suddenly becomes much lower; to move quickly in an uncontrolled way, or to make someone or something move in this way; to suddenly put someone or something in a much less successful situation, or to be suddenly put in such a situation;to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly into something; to cause to enter a state or course of action usually suddenly, unexpectedly, or violently ; to thrust or cast oneself into or as if into water;to become pitched or thrown headlong or violently forward and downward,to move oneself in such a manner,to descend or dip suddenly.dive, pitch, sound.

— Editors Contribution

Into

Into

indicating the passing of a thing from one form, condition, or state to another; as, compound substances may be resolved into others which are more simple; ice is convertible into water, and water into vapor; men are more easily drawn than forced into compliance; we may reduce many distinct substances into one mass; men are led by evidence into belief of truth, and are often enticed into the commission of crimes'into; she burst into tears; children are sometimes frightened into fits; all persons are liable to be seduced into error and folly

— Webster Dictionary

five kingdom system

five kingdom system

Once upon a time, all living things were lumped together into two kingdoms, namely plants and animals (at least, that's how I learned it). Animals included every living thing that moved, ate, and grew to a certain size and stopped growing. Plants included every living thing that did not move or eat and that continued to grow throughout life. It became very difficult to group some living things into one or the other, so early in the past century the two kingdoms were expanded into five kingdoms: Protista (the single-celled eukaryotes); Fungi (fungus and related organisms); Plantae (the plants); Animalia (the animals); Monera (the prokaryotes). Many biologists now recognize six distinct kingdoms, dividing Monera into the Eubacteria and Archeobacteria. All I can say is that the sytem holds true for this week, at least. It might even hold up for a century or two. Accepted systems of classification have changed at a far faster pace than the species have taken to evolve, that's for certain. Kingdoms are divided into categories called phyla, each phylum is divided into classes, each class into orders, each order into families, each family into genera, and each genus into species. A species represents one type of organism, such as dog, tiger shark, Ameoba proteus (the common amoeba), Homo sapiens (us), or Acer palmatum (Japanese maple). Note that species names should be underlined or written in italics. Classifying larger organisms into kingdoms is usually easy, but in a microenvironment it can be tricky. If you have had a little biology, a good exercise is to describe individual living things, and to try to classify them as to kingdom. Individuals are single-celled, may or may not move, have a cell wall, have no chloroplasts or other organelles, and have no nucleus. Monera are usually very tiny, although one type, namely the blue-green bacteria, look like algae. They are filamentous and quite long, green, but have no visible structure inside the cells. No visible feeding mechanism. They absorb nutrients through the cell wall or produce their own by photosynthesis. Protists are single-celled and usually move by cilia, flagella, or by amoeboid mechanisms. There is usually no cell wall, although some forms may have a cell wall. They have organelles including a nucleus and may have chloroplasts, so some will be green and others won't be. They are small, although many are big enough to be recognized in a dissecting microscope or even with a magnifying glass. Nutrien

— Editors Contribution

Birth control

Birth control

Birth control, also known as contraception and fertility control, are methods or devices used to prevent pregnancy. Planning and provision of birth control is called family planning. Safe sex, such as the use of male or female condoms, can also help prevent transmission of sexually transmitted infections. Contraceptive use in developing countries has cut the number of maternal deaths by 44% but could prevent 73% if the full demand for birth control were met. Because teenage pregnancies are at greater risk of poor outcomes such as preterm birth, low birth weight and infant death, some authors suggest adolescents need comprehensive sex education and access to reproductive health services, including contraception. By lengthening the time between pregnancies, birth control can also improve adult women's delivery outcomes and the survival of their children. Effective birth control methods include barriers such as condoms, diaphragms, and the contraceptive sponge; hormonal contraception including oral pills, patches, vaginal rings, and injectable contraceptives; and intrauterine devices. Emergency contraception can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. Long-acting reversible contraception such as implants, IUDs, or vaginal rings are recommended to reduce teenage pregnancy. Sterilization by means such as vasectomy and tubal ligation is permanent contraception. Some people regard sexual abstinence as birth control, but abstinence-only sex education often increases teen pregnancies when offered without contraceptive education. Non-penetrative sex and oral sex are also sometimes considered contraception.

— Freebase

Self-administration

Self-administration

Self-administration is, in its medical sense, the process of a subject administering a pharmacological substance to him-, her-, or itself. A clinical example of this is the subcutaneous "self-injection" of insulin by a diabetic patient. In animal experimentation, self-administration is a form of operant conditioning where the reward is a drug. This drug can be administered remotely through an implanted intravenous line or an intracerebroventricular injection. Self-administration of putatively addictive drugs is considered one of the most valid experimental models to investigate drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. The higher the frequency with which a test animal emits the operant behavior, the more rewarding, the test substance is considered. Self-administration of addictive drugs has been studied using humans, non-human primates, mice., and, most commonly, rats. Self-administration of heroin and cocaine is used to screen drugs for possible effects in reducing drug-taking behavior, especially reinstatement of drug seeking after extinction. Drugs with this effect may be useful for treating people with drug addiction by helping them establish abstinence or reducing their probability or relapsing to drug use after a period of abstinence.

— Freebase

Sexual abstinence

Sexual abstinence

Sexual abstinence is the practice of refraining from some or all aspects of sexual activity for medical, psychological, legal, social, financial, philosophical, moral or religious reasons. Asexuality is distinct from sexual abstinence and celibacy, which are behavioral and generally motivated by factors such as an individual's personal or religious beliefs.

— Freebase

Teetotalism

Teetotalism

Teetotalism refers to either the practice of or the promotion of complete abstinence from alcoholic beverages. A person who practices teetotalism is called a teetotaler or is simply said to be teetotal. The teetotalism movement was first started in Preston, England in the early 19th century. Some common reasons for choosing teetotalism are psychological, religious, health, medical, familial, philosophical, and social, or sometimes it is simply a matter of taste or preference. When at drinking establishments, teetotalers either abstain from drinking completely, or consume non-alcoholic beverages such as tea, coffee and mocktails. Contemporary and colloquial usage has somewhat expanded teetotalism to include strict abstinence from most recreational intoxicants. Most teetotaler organizations also demand from their members that they do not promote or produce alcoholic intoxicants.

— Freebase

dry

dry, teetotal

practicing complete abstinence from alcoholic beverages

— Princeton's WordNet

dryness

sobriety, dryness

moderation in or abstinence from alcohol or other drugs

— Princeton's WordNet

sobriety

sobriety, dryness

moderation in or abstinence from alcohol or other drugs

— Princeton's WordNet

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An antonym of "spellbound"
  • A. disenchanted
  • B. mesmerized
  • C. fascinated
  • D. transfixed