Synonyms containing height delay

We've found 2,801 synonyms:

Soft Costs

Soft Costs

Soft Cost is a construction industry term but more specifically a contractor accounting term for an expense item that is not considered direct construction cost. Soft costs include architectural, engineering, financing, and legal fees, and other pre- and post-construction expenses. The term has been replaced in most contractor accrual accounting with the term General & Administrative abbreviated G&A.. For a contractor, Soft Costs are essentially construction costs incurred that are not labor and materials. Delay in Start Up insurance coverage and soft costs are not the same. Some soft costs may be incurred in the repair of a covered loss before the anticipated completion date is reached. These can be architect fees or engineering fees incurred to repair loss or damage to the insured property. Only those indirect costs that are above what would have been incurred up to the anticipated but continue after such date due to the insured delay are soft costs that are covered by delay in completion or delay in start up coverage. Soft cost is a contractor accounting term for their expenses that are not associated with a particular construction task. Their construction trailer, water delivery, book keepers, etc. are all soft costs that continue on after the original anticipated completion date is reached, if the project is delayed. Only if the delay was caused by an insured loss would the insurance pick these expense up, and only if the policy includes delay in start up coverage. Any repair cost which are not labor or materials and are indemnified to complete the repair of property loss should not be reported under delay in completion and there is no delay in completion until the anticipated date of completion is reached, and the project is not finished. Not all indirect costs are time related expenses that continue after the original date of completion. Those soft costs which are continuing fixed expenses that continue because the project is delayed by an insured loss are soft costs that should be included with the delay in start up values. A soft cost to a contractor such as his admin costs can be a hard cost to the owner because what the contractor invoices the owner is the owners direct cost. If the owner employs engineers to overlook construction as the project is executed, this will be a continuing expense during repair if the repair is done after the original completion date and would be reported in the delay in completion vales. If the engineer cost was a one time charge for a design, he may need consulted to repair a loss. This expense does not occur because of a delay but is incurred to repair property damage and hence should be included in the construction costs if they want that expense covered in the indemnification depending on policy wording. If the project is insured to the extent of the reported values, and that value was left out to compute premium, the company may decline that cost in the indemnification.

— Freebase

Zodiac

Zodiac

zō′di-ak, n. an imaginary belt in the heavens, having as its mesial line the ecliptic or apparent path of the sun, and containing the twelve constellations, called signs of the zodiac. The constellations, with the appropriate symbols of the corresponding signs, are as follows: Aries (Ram), height:2ex;" alt="Aries" />; Taurus (Bull), height:2ex;" alt="Taurus" />; Gemini (Twins), height:2ex;" alt="Gemini" />; Cancer (Crab), height:2ex;" alt="Cancer" />; Leo (Lion), height:2ex;" alt="Leo" />; Virgo (Virgin), height:2ex;" alt="Virgo" />; Libra (Balance), height:2ex;" alt="Libra" />; Scorpio (Scorpion), height:2ex;" alt="Scorpio" />; Sagittarius (Archer), height:2ex;" alt="Sagittarius" />; Capricornus (Goat), height:2ex;" alt="Capricornus" />; Aquarius (Water-bearer), height:2ex;" alt="Aquarius" />; Pisces (Fishes), height:2ex;" alt="Pisces" />.—adj. Zodī′acal.—Zodiacal light, a singular appearance seen after sunset or before sunrise, at all seasons of the year in low latitudes, but rarely in Great Britain, except in March, April, and May in the evenings, and six months later in the mornings. [Fr. zodiaque—L. zodiacus—Gr. zōdiakos, belonging to animals—zōdion, dim. of zōon, an animal, zaein, to live.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

x-height

x-height

In typography, the x-height or corpus size refers to the distance between the baseline and the mean line in a typeface. Typically, this is the height of the letter x in the font, as well as the u, v, w, and z. However, in modern typography, the x-height is simply a design characteristic of the font, and while an x is usually exactly one x-height in height, in some more decorative or script designs, this may not always be the case. Lowercase letters whose height is greater than the x-height either have descenders which extend below the baseline, such as y, g, q, and p, or have ascenders which extend above the x-height, such as l, k, b, and d. The ratio of the x-height to the body height is one of the major characteristics that defines the appearance of a typeface. The height of the capital letters is referred to as Cap height. In computing, one use of x-height is as a unit of measurement in web pages. In CSS, and LaTeX the x-height is called an ex. The use of ex in dimensioning objects, however, is less stable than use of the em across browsers. Internet Explorer, for example, dimensions ex at exactly one half of em, whereas Mozilla Firefox dimensions ex closer to the actual x-height of the font, rounded relative to the font's current pixel height. Thus, the exact ratio of ex to em can also vary by font size within a browser if the determined values are rounded to the nearest whole unit. For example, a browser calculating an x-height of 45% on a font 10 pixels tall may round ex to either 4 pixels or 5 pixels or leave it at 4.5 pixels.

— Freebase

Discounting

Discounting

Discounting is a financial mechanism in which a debtor obtains the right to delay payments to a creditor, for a defined period of time, in exchange for a charge or fee. Essentially, the party that owes money in the present purchases the right to delay the payment until some future date. The discount, or charge, is simply the difference between the original amount owed in the present and the amount that has to be paid in the future to settle the debt. The discount is usually associated with a discount rate, which is also called the discount yield. The discount yield is simply the proportional share of the initial amount owed that must be paid to delay payment for 1 year. Discount Yield = "Charge" to Delay Payment for 1 year / Debt Liability It is also the rate at which the amount owed must rise to delay payment for 1 year. Since a person can earn a return on money invested over some period of time, most economic and financial models assume the "Discount Yield" is the same as the Rate of Return the person could receive by investing this money elsewhere over the given period of time covered by the delay in payment. The Concept is associated with the Opportunity Cost of not having use of the money for the period of time covered by the delay in payment. The relationship between the "Discount Yield" and the Rate of Return on other financial assets is usually discussed in such economic and financial theories involving the inter-relation between various Market Prices, and the achievement of Pareto Optimality through the operations in the Capitalistic Price Mechanism, as well as in the discussion of the "Efficient Market Hypothesis". The person delaying the payment of the current Liability is essentially compensating the person to whom he/she owes money for the lost revenue that could be earned from an investment during the time period covered by the delay in payment. Accordingly, it is the relevant "Discount Yield" that determines the "Discount", and not the other way around.ttt

— Freebase

Broadcast delay

Broadcast delay

In radio and television, broadcast delay refers to the practice of intentionally delaying broadcast of live material. A short delay is often used to prevent profanity, bloopers, violence, or other undesirable material from making it to air, including more mundane problems such as technical malfunctions or coughing. In this instance, it is often referred to as a seven-second delay or profanity delay. Longer delays can also be introduced, often to allow a show to air at the same time for the local market as is sometimes done with nationally-broadcast programs in countries with multiple time zones. That can sometimes be simply achieved with a video tape recorder or similar technology. In the context of modern digital video recorders, this can now be considered a class of time shifting. In this instance, it is often called a tape delay or west-coast delay in the United States, so-called because special events broadcast live in the Eastern & Central time zones of the US are often tape-delayed on the west coast. This includes Southern California, despite the fact that Southern California is where many live televised events take place. Nationally telecast morning news shows in the U.S. typically are aired live only in the Eastern time zone, while on tape delay in the remaining time zones.

— Freebase

Workers Compensation in Virginia

Workers Compensation in Virginia

Workers’ compensation in Virginia began in 1919 and is a no fault system. Workers’ compensation is considered a compromise between employers and employees. It helps relieve hardship for an injured worker but does not give “full compensation.” Prior to the enactment of the workers’ compensation laws, to receive any type of benefits an employee had to show that the employer was negligent in failing to provide a safe work environment. Needless to say, this usually resulted in lengthy and expensive litigation that caused the employee and his family to suffer. Now, under workers’ compensation, the employee receives benefits (a portion of his lost wages and medical treatment) much faster and for less cost, without ever having to show an employer is negligent. However, as a result of this “compromise,” an employee cannot recover compensation for pain and suffering. The employee gave up the possibility of getting a big financial windfall for immediate medical treatment and a portion of lost wages. On paper, this sounds like a fair compromise. However, what has happened through the years is that the insurance companies and large corporations have lobbied the Virginia State Legislature and have carved away numerous exceptions that usually favor the employer over the employee. Not all accidents that happen at work are covered under workers’ compensation. This means that now, when individuals get hurt at work, they not only have to deal with the financial burden of not working and their health issues, but to get their benefits, they have to fight with the big businesses, big manufacturers, and big insurance companies who spend millions of dollars each year attacking and seeking to change the workers’ compensation laws to benefit hemselves and deprive injured individuals of their benefits. Insurance companies love to and are trained to “delay, delay,deny, delay…” This strategy and the workers’ compensation rules favoring employers hurt injured workers even more. Workers’ compensation is governed by the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission—not insurance companies. The Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission is a state agency. Everything must go through the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission. Filing a claim with the insurance company is not the same as filing a claim with the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission. Check out their website at www.vwc.state.va.us for more information about the commission.

— Editors Contribution

Human height

Human height

Human height or stature is the distance from the bottom of the feet to the top of the head in a human body, standing erect. It is measured using a stadiometer, usually in centimetres when using the metric system, or feet and inches when using the imperial system.In the early phase of anthropometric research history, questions about height techniques for measuring nutritional status often concerned genetic differences. A particular genetic profile in men called Y haplotype I-M170 is correlated with height. Ecological data shows that as the frequency of this genetic profile increases in the population, the average male height in a country also increases. Height is also important because it is closely correlated with other health components, such as life expectancy. Studies show that there is a correlation between small stature and a longer life expectancy. Individuals of small stature are also more likely to have lower blood pressure and are less likely to acquire cancer. The University of Hawaii has found that the “longevity gene” FOXO3 that reduces the effects of aging is more commonly found in individuals of a small body size. Short stature decreases the risk of venous insufficiency.When populations share genetic background and environmental factors, average height is frequently characteristic within the group. Exceptional height variation (around 20% deviation from average) within such a population is sometimes due to gigantism or dwarfism, which are medical conditions caused by specific genes or endocrine abnormalities.The development of human height can serve as an indicator of two key welfare components, namely nutritional quality and health. In regions of poverty or warfare, environmental factors like chronic malnutrition during childhood or adolescence may result in delayed growth and/or marked reductions in adult stature even without the presence of any of these medical conditions. Height is a sexually dimorphic trait in humans. A study of 20th century British natality trends indicated that while tall men tended to reproduce more than short men, women of below average height had more children than taller women.

— Wikipedia

Height gauge

Height gauge

A height gauge is a measuring device used for determining the height of objects, and for marking of items to be worked on. These measuring tools are used in metalworking or metrology to either set or measure vertical distances; the pointer is sharpened to allow it to act as a scriber and assist in marking out work pieces. Devices similar in concept, with lower resolutions, are used in health care settings (health clinics, surgeries) to find the height of people, in which context they are called stadiometers. Height gauges may also be used to measure the height of an object by using the underside of the scriber as the datum. The datum may be permanently fixed or the height gauge may have provision to adjust the scale, this is done by sliding the scale vertically along the body of the height gauge by turning a fine feed screw at the top of the gauge; then with the scriber set to the same level as the base, the scale can be matched to it. This adjustment allows different scribers or probes to be used, as well as adjusting for any errors in a damaged or resharpened probe. In the toolroom, the distinction between a height gauge and a surface gauge is that a height gauge has a measuring head (whether vernier, fine rack and pinion with dial, or linear encoder with digital display), whereas a surface gauge has only a scriber point. Both are typically used on a surface plate and have a heavy base with an accurately flat, smooth underside.

— Wikipedia

Clocker

Clocker

Clocker, for clock, galvanic skin response sensor and digital delay system, is a minimalist electronic music piece by Alvin Lucier conceived in 1978, though Lucier felt there did not exist an appropriate digital delay system till 1988: "With this new equipment, the sounds of the delayed clock now matched those of the original, creating clear copies and with them a more convincing illusion of time expanding and contracting. Later I added a bank of fixed delays which, as they splay out from the voltage controlled delay, create multiple reflections that almost convince the listener that the room is changing size." What was played through the digital delay system, a Digitech RDS 7.6 with a continuously variable voltage control output, was the sounds of a clock, a Westclox Silver Bell Monogram, ticking, with the delay controlled by a galvanic skin response sensor. The GSR, by sending a small current through the body, reads minute differences in skin resistance which in turn is influenced by the performers thoughts and emotions: "I had wanted to make a work in which a performer could speed up and slow down time, stopping it, if possible, simply by thinking." The 1991 release was recorded in a stone room twenty foot square and thirty feet high. Six small loudspeakers where placed about the room aimed at various walls to create acoustic delays. Collins then routed the audio through different combinations of speakers according to a score written by Lucier, apparently for the occasion, in 1991.

— Freebase

Placement

Placement

Placement is an essential step in electronic design automation - the portion of the physical design flow that assigns exact locations for various circuit components within the chip’s core area. An inferior placement assignment will not only affect the chip's performance but might also make it nonmanufacturable by producing excessive wirelength, which is beyond available routing resources. Consequently, a placer must perform the assignment while optimizing a number of objectives to ensure that a circuit meets its performance demands. Typical placement objectives include ⁕Total wirelength: Minimizing the total wirelength, or the sum of the length of all the wires in the design, is the primary objective of most existing placers. This not only helps minimize chip size, and hence cost, but also minimizes power and delay, which are proportional to the wirelength ⁕Timing: The clock cycle of a chip is determined by the delay of its longest path, usually referred to as the critical path. Given a performance specification, a placer must ensure that no path exists with delay exceeding the maximum specified delay.

— Freebase

Cathetometer

Cathetometer

an instrument for the accurate measurement of small differences of height; esp. of the differences in the height of the upper surfaces of two columns of mercury or other fluid, or of the same column at different times. It consists of a telescopic leveling apparatus (d), which slides up or down a perpendicular metallic standard very finely graduated (bb). The telescope is raised or depressed in order to sight the objects or surfaces, and the differences in vertical height are thus shown on the graduated standard

— Webster Dictionary

Quadrat

Quadrat

kwod′rat, n. a piece of type-metal lower than the letters, used in spacing between words and filling out blank lines (commonly Quad)—distinguished as en (height:2.5ex;" alt="En quadrat" />), em (height:2.5ex;" alt="Em quadrat" />), two-em (height:2.5ex;" alt="Two-Em quadrat" />), and three-em (height:2.5ex;" alt="Three-Em quadrat" />).

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Speedy trial

Speedy trial

The right to a speedy trial is a human right under which it is asserted that a government prosecutor may not delay the trial of a criminal suspect arbitrarily and indefinitely. Otherwise, the power to impose such delays would effectively allow prosecutors to send anyone to jail for an arbitrary length of time without trial. Although it is important for the protection of speedy trial rights that there be a court in which a defendant may complain about the unreasonable delay of the trial, it is also important that nations implement structures that avoid the delay.

— Wikipedia

Pulse height analyzer

Pulse height analyzer

A Pulse Height Analyzer is an instrument used in nuclear and elementary particle physics research which accepts electronic pulses of varying heights from particle and event detectors, digitizes the pulse heights, and saves the number of pulses of each height in registers or channels for later spectral analysis. Synonymous terms for 'Pulse Height Analysis' are; "pulse height spectrum" or "pulse height distribution." A PHA is a specific modification to MultiChannel Analyzers os Spectrometer. A pulse height analyzer is also used as integrated into particle counters, or as a discrete module to calibrate particle counters.

— Freebase

Small caps

Small caps

In typography, small capitals are uppercase characters set at the same height and weight as surrounding lowercase letters or text figures. They are used in running text to prevent capitalized words from appearing too large on the page, and as a method of emphasis or distinctiveness for text alongside or instead of italics, or when boldface is inappropriate. For example, TEXT IN CAPS appears as text in caps. They can be used to draw attention to the opening phrase or line of a new section of text, or to provide an additional style in a dictionary entry where many parts must be typographically differentiated. Typically, the height of a small capital will be one ex, the same height as most lowercase characters in the font. In Anglo-Saxon typography, small caps are about 10% larger than the x-height. To differentiate between these two variants the x-height form is sometimes called petite caps. OpenType fonts can define both forms via the "small caps" and the "petite caps" features. Because the support for the petite caps feature is absent from most desktop-publishing programs, many fonts use x-height small caps in the small-caps feature. Well designed small capitals are not simply scaled-down versions of normal capitals; they normally retain the same stroke weight as other letters and have a wider aspect ratio for readability.

— Freebase

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An antonym for "ignominious"
  • A. smuggled
  • B. opprobrious
  • C. inglorious
  • D. honorable