Synonyms containing in abraham's bosom

We've found 456 synonyms:

Abraham

Abraham

Abraham is the founding father of the Israelites, with a prominent role in Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The story of Abraham is told in chapters 11:26-25:18 of the book of Genesis. It is essentially the history of the establishment of the covenant between Abraham and God: God calls Abraham to leave his land, family and household in Mesopotamia in return for a new land, family and inheritance in Canaan, the promised land; threats to the covenant arise; but all are overcome and the covenant is established. Abraham's story ends with the death and burial of his wife Sarah in the grave that he has purchased in Hebron, followed by the marriage of Isaac to a wife from his own people: these two episodes signify Abraham's desire of the land for his descendants and the exclusion of land's previous inhabitants, the Canaanites, from its ownership. The Bible's internal chronology places Abraham and the patriarchs in the second millennium BCE, but the stories in Genesis cannot be related to the known history of that time, and most biblical histories no longer begin with the patriarchal period.

— Freebase

Keturah

Keturah

According to the Hebrew Bible, Keturah or Ketura was the woman whom Abraham, the patriarch of the Israelites, married after the death of his wife, Sarah. Keturah bore Abraham six sons, Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah. The spelling of the sons' names varies as can be seen in 1st century CE Historian Flavius Josephus, who mentions Keturah and her sons in Antiquities of the Jews 1.238. Keturah is referred to at different times as either Abraham's wife in Genesis 25:1 or Abraham's concubine in 1 Chronicles 1:32. While Abraham left everything to Isaac, he made grants to his sons by his concubine during his lifetime, and sent them east away from Isaac. He died at the age of 175. Keturah's six sons represent Arabian tribes south and east of Canaan. Some, but not all, Jewish philosophers identify Keturah with Hagar, stating that Abraham sought her out after Sarah's death, and that Hagar's change of name to Keturah was symbolic of the pleasantness of her teshuvah from her sinfulness during her exile. This interpretation is set forth in the Midrash and is supported by Rashi, Gur Aryeh, Keli Yakar, and Obadiah of Bertinoro. The contrary view is advocated by Abraham ibn Ezra, Radak, Rashbam, and Ramban.

— Freebase

Abraham-man

Abraham-man

ā′bra-ham-man, n. originally a lunatic beggar from Bethlehem Hospital in London, marked by a special badge. Many sturdy beggars assumed this, hence the phrase To sham Abraham, to feign sickness, still used among sailors. [The wards in the old Bedlam are said to have been distinguished by the names of saints and patriarchs, as Abraham. Some find the origin of the name in an allusion to the parable of the beggar Lazarus, who found his rest in Abraham's bosom (Luke xvi.).]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Abraham Ford

Abraham Ford

Sgt. Abraham Ford is a fictional character from the comic book series The Walking Dead and was portrayed by Michael Cudlitz in the American television series of the same name. In both mediums Abraham traveled the country with his girlfriend Rosita Espinosa to escort Dr. Eugene Porter to Washington, D.C. where the supposed cure for the outbreak is located, eventually recruiting Rick Grimes' group to accompany them. Though tough, and a skilled shooter, Abraham displays aggressive outbursts and has volatile tendencies towards the other group members, but over time he gains a strong sense of respect for Rick and becomes one of his right-hand men. He is also displayed as being emotionally broken from the pain he endured due to his family being killed by zombies. Eventually, Eugene is revealed to have lied and has no cure; Abraham lashes out at Eugene, and then becomes reclusive until the group find the Alexandria Safe-Zone, where Abraham becomes head of the construction crew. Over time, he and Eugene are able to make amends. Cudlitz received acclaim for his portrayal of Abraham in the show, and is noted for his numerous unique one-liners and catchphrases.

— Wikipedia

Bosom

Bosom

bōōz′um, n. the breast of a human being, or the part of the dress which covers it: (fig.) the seat of the passions and feelings: the heart: embrace, enclosure, as within the arms: any close or secret receptacle.—adj. (in composition) confidential: intimate.—v.t. to enclose in the bosom.—Abraham's bosom, the abode of the blessed dead.—To take to one's bosom, to marry: to make an intimate friend of. [A.S. bósm; Ger. busen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Milcah

Milcah

Milcah was the daughter of Haran and the wife of Nahor in Genesis. Milcah was a woman of ancient Mesopotamia and an ancestor of the patriarch Jacob. Milcah was born to Haran, who had another daughter, Iscah. This Haran seemed to be different from Haran, Abraham's brother, who had a son, Lot. Haran, Abraham's brother, died in Ur before his father Terah. Milcah married Nahor, another of Abraham’s brothers. There is a prevalent assumption that the two men with the name Haran are indeed one person. If that is true, then Milcah married to her uncle. Although Leviticus would later outlaw marriages between aunt and nephew, it did not rule out marriage between uncle and niece. The Talmud approved of a man who married his sister’s daughter. And in the Talmud, Rabbi Isaac equates Milcah’s sister Iscah with Sarah, who married Abraham, who was also their uncle. Thus, according to Rabbi Isaac, the two sisters, Milcah and Iscah, married the two brothers, Nahor and Abraham.

— Freebase

bosomed

bosomed

having a bosom as specified or having something likened to a bosom; usually used in compounds

— Princeton's WordNet

Jokshan

Jokshan

Jokshan (Hebrew: יָקשָׁן yoqšān, "an offense", "hardness", or "a knocking" Arabic يقشان yaqshaan); most probably Josephus' Jazar. According to the Bible he was a son of Abraham and his either wife or concubine Keturah, whom he wed after the death of Sarah. Jokshan had five brothers: Zimran, Medan, Midian, Ishbak and Shuah; as well as two half brothers: Ishmael and Isaac. He was Keturah's second son and Abraham's fourth. Josephus records that "Abraham contrived to settle them in colonies; and they took possession of Troglodytis and the country of Arabia Felix, as far as it reaches to the Red Sea." Abraham in all probability, tried to keep them apart from Isaac to avoid conflict while fulfilling God's commission to spread out and inhabit the globe.Jokshan became the father of Sheba and Dedan. Dedan had three sons, named Asshurim, Letushim, and Leummim.

— Wikipedia

Egyptus

Egyptus

In Latter-day Saint theology, Egyptus is the name of two women in the Book of Abraham in the Pearl of Great Price. One is the wife of Ham, son of Noah, who bears his children. The other is their daughter, who discovers Egypt while "it was under water". The younger Egyptus places her eldest son on the throne as Pharaoh, the first king of Egypt. The word Egyptus is considered to be an anachronism in the Book of Abraham among non-Mormon Egyptologists and historians, since the origin of term "Egypt" is believed to have come from another source much later in history from the time of the narrative described in the Book of Abraham. The word "pharaoh" is also considered to be an anachronism in the Book of Abraham for similar reasons.

— Freebase

abraham

Abraham, Ibrahim

the first of the Old Testament patriarchs and the father of Isaac; according to Genesis, God promised to give Abraham's family (the Hebrews) the land of Canaan (the Promised Land); God tested Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his son

— Princeton's WordNet

book of genesis

Genesis, Book of Genesis

the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers

— Princeton's WordNet

esau

Esau

(Old Testament) the eldest son of Isaac who would have inherited the covenant that God made with Abraham and that Abraham passed on to Isaac; he traded his birthright to his twin brother Jacob for a mess of pottage

— Princeton's WordNet

genesis

Genesis, Book of Genesis

the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers

— Princeton's WordNet

ibrahim

Abraham, Ibrahim

the first of the Old Testament patriarchs and the father of Isaac; according to Genesis, God promised to give Abraham's family (the Hebrews) the land of Canaan (the Promised Land); God tested Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his son

— Princeton's WordNet

isaac

Isaac

(Old Testament) the second patriarch; son of Abraham and Sarah who was offered by Abraham as a sacrifice to God; father of Jacob and Esau

— Princeton's WordNet

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