Synonyms containing in abraham's bosom Page #31

We've found 461 synonyms:

Hawazin

Hawazin

Ha'wa zin was a sub-division from the Qais Ailan tribe, a pre-Islamic Arabian tribe concentrated in the area around Ta’if in the Arabian Peninsula. Its descendants are scattered across the Middle-East and North Africa as many of its members were dispatched after the Muslim conquests to Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Morocco, and Spain but live mainly as the Sunni muslims of Syria. The remaining descendants in Arabia go by the name of 'Utaybah. Genealogists trace the tribe to Adnan bin Moudir. The descendants of Adnan are part of the northern tribes of Arabia. Historians trace the tribe roots to the following bloodline: Hawazin bin Mansour bin Ekrama bin Khafsa bin Qais Ailan bin Moudir bin Nizar bin Ma'ad bin Adnan ibn Add ibn Send ibn Napyot ibn Ishmael ibn Abraham ibn Azar ibn Nahoor ibn Srooj ibn Ra'o ibn Phaleg ibn Aber ibn Shaleh ibn Arpheckshad ibn Sam ibn Noah ibn Lamek ibn Motoshaleh ibn Edres ibn Yared ibn Mehlaiel ibn Qenan ibn Anosh ibn Sheeth ibn Adam. The tribes cited under this bloodline are sometimes referred to as Ishmaelites.

— Freebase

Ten percent plan

Ten percent plan

During the American Civil War in December 1863, Abraham Lincoln offered a model for reinstatement of Southern states called the 10 percent Reconstruction plan. It decreed that a state could be reintegrated into the Union when 10% of the 1860 vote count from that state had taken an oath of allegiance to the U.S. and pledged to abide by emancipation. Voters could then elect delegates to draft revised state constitutions and establish new state governments. All southerners except for high-ranking Confederate army officers and government officials would be granted a full pardon. Lincoln guaranteed southerners that he would protect their private property, though not their slaves. By 1864, Louisiana, Tennessee, and Arkansas had established fully functioning Unionist governments. This policy was meant to shorten the war by offering a moderate peace plan. It was also intended to further his emancipation policy by insisting that the new governments abolished slavery. Congress reacted sharply to this proclamation of Lincoln's plan.

— Freebase

Colebrooke, Devon

Colebrooke, Devon

Colebrooke is a village and parish in Devon, England about 8 km west of Crediton. The main point of interest is the church and the connection to Henry Kingsley's novel Recollections of Geoffrey Hamlyn. Also Uncle Tom Cobley, of the folk song, signed his will at Pascoe House,but is buried 4 miles west at Spreyton. The champion Devon wrestler, Abraham Cann was born and buried here. He won the all comers wrestling crown in London. Colebrooke is also the site SS7700 of a Roman fort or marching camp, the site of which is just outside the village to the East. Disputed - see below. Colebrooke gave its name to Colebrook, Connecticut, United States.

— Freebase

Theory Z

Theory Z

Theory Z is a name for various theories of human motivation built on Douglas McGregor's Theory X and Theory Y. Theories X, Y and various versions of Z have been used in human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational communication and organizational development. One Theory Z was developed by Abraham H. Maslow in his paper "Theory Z" and the other is Dr. William Ouchi's so-called "Japanese Management" style popularized during the Asian economic boom of the 1980s. The third was developed by W. J. Reddin in Managerial Effectiveness. McGregor's Theory Y in contrast to Theory X, which stated that workers inherently dislike and avoid work and must be driven to it, and Theory Y, which stated that work is natural and can be a source of satisfaction when aimed at higher order human psychological needs. For Ouchi, Theory Z focused on increasing employee loyalty to the company by providing a job for life with a strong focus on the well-being of the employee, both on and off the job. According to Ouchi, Theory Z management tends to promote stable employment, high productivity, and high employee morale and satisfaction.

— Freebase

Horites

Horites

Horites or Horim were a people mentioned in the Torah inhabiting areas around Mount Seir which was in Canaan. Mt. Seir seems to have been named after one Seir, who the land of the Horites -"the land of Seir" was named after. He was the anscestor of the Horite chiefs listed in Genesis 36:20f. The Horites have been identified with references in Egyptian inscriptions to Khar, which concern a southern region of Canaan Despite the widespread influence of the Hurrians, a more northern people, these were probably not the same as the Horites. The first mention of the Horites in the Torah was when they were defeated by a coalition of Eastern kings led by the Kedorlaomer of Elam. These kings had come through the Horite territory to subdue a rebellion by a coalition of other 'kings' of peoples whom they had ruled for twelve years, who were living near the Salt Sea and Sodom and Gomorrah. Later, according to Genesis 36, the Horites co-existed and inter-married with the family of Esau, grandson of Abraham through Isaac. They were eventually brought under the rule of the descendants of Esau, also then known as Edom.

— Freebase

Heart of Oak

Heart of Oak

"Heart of Oak" is the official march of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. It is also the official march of several Commonwealth navies including the Royal Canadian Navy and the Royal New Zealand Navy. Royal Canadian Sea Cadets sing "Heart of Oak" during days of their parades.. The music was composed by Dr. William Boyce, and the words were written by the 18th-century English actor David Garrick. "Heart of Oak" was originally written as an opera. It first saw the light of day on New Year's Eve of 1760, sung by Samuel Thomas Champnes, one of Handel's soloists, in Garrick's pantomime "Harlequin's Invasion", at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. The "wonderful year" referenced in the first verse was 1759, an "Annus mirabilis" during which British forces were victorious in several significant battles: the Battle of Minden on 1 August 1759, the Battle of Lagos on 19 August 1759, the Battle of the Plains of Abraham on 13 September 1759, and the Battle of Quiberon Bay on 20 November 1759.. These victories were followed a few months later by the Battle of Wandiwash in India on 22 January 1760. Britain's continued success in the war boosted the song's popularity.

— Freebase

The Impossible Dream

The Impossible Dream

The Impossible Dream is the debut album from The X Factor UK series 2 runner-up Andy Abraham. It was released on 20 March 2006 and entered the UK Album Chart on 26 March 2006 at #2 selling 176,689 copies in its first week.

— Freebase

Alexander H. Stephens

Alexander H. Stephens

Alexander Hamilton Stephens was an American politician from Georgia and Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. He also served as a U.S. Representative from Georgia and as the 50th Governor of Georgia from 1882 until his death in 1883. He was an old Whig Party friend and ally of Abraham Lincoln. They met in the closing days of the Civil War but could not come to terms.

— Freebase

Fireside chats

Fireside chats

The fireside chats were a series of thirty evening radio addresses given by President Franklin D. Roosevelt between 1933 and 1944. Although the World War I Committee on Public Information had seen presidential policy propagated to the public en masse, "fireside chats" were the first media development that facilitated intimate and direct communication between the president and the citizens of the United States. Roosevelt's cheery voice and demeanor played him into the favor of citizens and he soon became one of the most popular presidents ever, often affectionately compared to Abraham Lincoln. On radio, he was able to quell rumors and explain his reasons for social change slowly and comprehensibly. Radio was especially convenient for Roosevelt because it enabled him to hide his polio symptoms from the public eye. Roosevelt preferred radio, because most of the major newspapers in the United States, and most of the circulation, tilted heavily toward the opposing Republican Party.

— Freebase

respectability

respectability

The dickey on the bosom of civilization.

— The Roycroft Dictionary

SHIRT

SHIRT

Every man's bosom friend.

— The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

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An antonym of "spellbound"
  • A. mesmerized
  • B. transfixed
  • C. fascinated
  • D. disenchanted