Synonyms containing jussieu, antoine laurent de

We've found 218 synonyms:

Jussieu

Jussieu

Jussieu is a station on lines 7 and 10 of the Paris Métro in the eastern part of the Latin Quarter in the 5th arrondissement. The station was opened on 26 April 1931 with the extension of line 7 from Pont de Sully to Place Monge and its incorporation of part of Line 10 from Place Monge to Porte de Choisy. At the same time the remaining section of line 10 was extended from the new station of Cardinal Lemoine to Jussieu. The station is under and named after the Place Jussieu, which was named after the De Jussieu family of famous botanists and historians of the natural world, several of whom have been associated with the nearby Jardin des Plantes. The station used to be called "Jussieu-Halles-aux-vins" after the wine market created there by Napoleon Bonaparte. This name has been shortened because, after 1957, the market was replaced by the Jussieu Campus of the University of Paris.

— Freebase

Antoine Laurent de Jussieu

Antoine Laurent de Jussieu

Antoine Laurent de Jussieu was a French botanist, notable as the first to publish a natural classification of flowering plants; much of his system remains in use today. His classification was based on and extended unpublished work by his uncle, the botanist Bernard de Jussieu.

— Freebase

Antoine's

Antoine's

Antoine's is a Louisiana Creole cuisine restaurant located at 713 rue St. Louis (St. Louis Street) in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana. It is one of the oldest family-run restaurants in the United States, having been established in 1840 by Antoine Alciatore. A New Orleans institution, it is notable for being the birthplace of several famous dishes, such as Oysters Rockefeller, Pompano en Papillote, Eggs Sardou and Pigeonneaux Paradis. Antoine's Cookbook, compiled by Roy F. Guste (the fifth-generation proprietor) features hundreds of recipes from the Antoine's tradition. It is also known for its VIP patrons including several U.S. presidents and Pope John Paul II. Antoine's features a 25,000 bottle capacity wine storage and 15 dining rooms of varying sizes and themes, with several featuring Mardi Gras krewe memorabilia. The lengthy menu (originally only in French, now in French and English) features classic French-Creole dishes. By tradition, it's closed to the general public on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Mardi Gras. It can be reserved for private parties on these "Closed Days". Advance reservations are required for dining during Mardi Gras and on weekends. The executive chef as of November 2012 is Michael Regua.

— Wikipedia

Saint Laurent Paris

Saint Laurent Paris

Saint Laurent is a luxury fashion house founded by Yves Saint Laurent and his partner, Pierre Bergé. The founder of the brand died in 2008. In 2012, Kering announced that Hedi Slimane replaced Stefano Pilati at the helm of the brand. On June 21, 2012, the ready-to-wear line was rebranded as Saint Laurent. However the Yves Saint Laurent name and iconic YSL logo have been retained for accessories such as handbags and shoes, and cosmetics.

— Freebase

Laurent series

Laurent series

In mathematics, the Laurent series of a complex function f is a representation of that function as a power series which includes terms of negative degree. It may be used to express complex functions in cases where a Taylor series expansion cannot be applied. The Laurent series was named after and first published by Pierre Alphonse Laurent in 1843. Karl Weierstrass may have discovered it first in 1841 but did not publish it at the time. The Laurent series for a complex function f about a point c is given by: where the an are constants, defined by a line integral which is a generalization of Cauchy's integral formula: The path of integration is counterclockwise around a closed, rectifiable path containing no self-intersections, enclosing c and lying in an annulus A in which is holomorphic. The expansion for will then be valid anywhere inside the annulus. The annulus is shown in red in the diagram on the right, along with an example of a suitable path of integration labeled . If we take to be a circle, where, this just amounts to computing the complex Fourier coefficients of the restriction of to . The fact that these integrals are unchanged by a deformation of the contour is an immediate consequence of Stokes' theorem.

— Freebase

Gelsemium

Gelsemium

Gelsemium is a genus of flowering plants belonging to family Gelsemiaceae. The genus contains three species of shrubs to straggling or twining climbers. Two species are native to North America, and one to China and Southeast Asia. Carolus Linnaeus first classified G. sempervirens as Bignonia sempervirens in 1753; Antoine Laurent de Jussieu renamed the genus in 1789. Gelsemium is a Latinized form of the Italian word for jasmine, gelsomino. G. elegans is also nicknamed "heartbreak grass".

— Freebase

Polygonaceae

Polygonaceae

The Polygonaceae are a family of flowering plants known informally as the knotweed family or smartweed—buckwheat family in the United States. The name is based on the genus Polygonum, and was first used by Antoine Laurent de Jussieu in 1789 in his book, Genera Plantarum. The name refers to the many swollen nodes the stems of some species have. It is derived from Greek; poly means many and goni means knee or joint. The Polygonaceae comprise about 1200 species distributed into about 50 genera. The largest genera are Eriogonum, Rumex, Coccoloba, Persicaria and Calligonum. The family is present worldwide, but is most diverse in the North Temperate Zone. Several species are cultivated as ornamentals. A few species of Triplaris provide lumber. The fruit of the sea grape is eaten, and in Florida, jelly is made from it and sold commercially. The seeds of two species of Fagopyrum, known as buckwheat, provide grain. The petioles of rhubarb are a food item. The leaves of the common sorrel are eaten in salads or as a potherb.

— Freebase

Thymelaeaceae

Thymelaeaceae

Thymelaeaceae are a cosmopolitan family of flowering plants composed of 50 genera and 898 species. It was established in 1789 by Antoine Laurent de Jussieu. Thymelaeaceae are in the order Malvales. Except for a sister relationship with Tepuianthaceae, little is known for sure about their relationships with the other families in the order. The family is more diverse in the southern hemisphere than in the northern, with a major concentrations of species in Africa and Australia. The genera are overwhelmingly African Thymelaeaceae are mostly trees and shrubs, with a few vines and herbaceous plants. Several genera are of economic importance. Gonystylus, is valued for its hard, white wood. The bark of Edgeworthia and Wikstroemia is used as a component of paper. Daphne, is grown for its sweetly scented flowers. Species of Wikstroemia, Daphne, Phaleria, Dais, Pimelea and other genera are grown as ornamentals. Many of the species are poisonous if eaten. A good collection of pictures of plants in this family has appeared in a scientific paper. Herber recognized 45 genera, excluding Tepuianthus from the family, sinking Atemnosiphon and Englerodaphne into Gnidia, Eriosolena into Daphne, and Thecanthes into Pimelea.

— Freebase

Paguridae

Paguridae

Paguridae is a family of hermit crabs of the order Decapoda. It contains 542 species in over 70 genera: ⁕Acanthopagurus de Saint Laurent, 1968 ⁕Agaricochirus McLaughlin, 1981 ⁕Alainopaguroides McLaughlin, 1997 ⁕Alainopagurus Lemaitre & McLaughlin, 1995 ⁕Alloeopagurodes Komai, 1998 ⁕Anapagrides de Saint Laurent-Dechance, 1966 ⁕Anapagurus Henderson, 1886 ⁕Anisopagurus McLaughlin, 1981 ⁕Bathiopagurus McLaughlin, 2003 ⁕Bathypaguropsis McLaughlin, 1994 ⁕Benthopagurus Wass, 1963 ⁕Boninpagurus Asakura & Tachikawa, 2004 ⁕Bythiopagurus McLaughlin, 2003 ⁕Catapaguroides A. Milne-Edwards & Bouvier, 1892 ⁕Catapaguropsis Lemaitre & McLaughlin, 2006 ⁕Catapagurus A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 ⁕Ceratopagurus Yokoya, 1933 ⁕Cestopagurus Bouvier, 1897 ⁕Chanopagurus Lemaitre, 2003 ⁕Cycetopagurus McLaughlin, 2004 ⁕Decaphyllus de Saint Laurent, 1968 ⁕Dentalopagurus McLaughlin, 2007 ⁕Diacanthurus McLaughlin & Forest, 1997 ⁕Discorsopagurus McLaughlin, 1974 ⁕Elassochirus Benedict, 1892 ⁕Enallopaguropsis McLaughlin, 1981 ⁕Enallopagurus McLaughlin, 1981 ⁕Enneobranchus Garcia-Gomez, 1988 ⁕Enneopagurus McLaughlin, 1997 ⁕Enneophyllus McLaughlin, 1997 ⁕Forestopagurus Garcia-Gomez, 1995 ⁕Goreopagurus McLaughlin, 1988

— Freebase

Bastille

Bastille

The Bastille was a fortress in Paris, known formally as the Bastille Saint-Antoine. It played an important role in the internal conflicts of France and for most of its history was used as a state prison by the kings of France. It was stormed by a crowd on 14 July 1789 in the French Revolution, becoming an important symbol for the French Republican movement, and was later demolished and replaced by the Place de la Bastille. The Bastille was built to defend the eastern approach to the city of Paris from the English threat in the Hundred Years War. Initial work began in 1357, but the main construction occurred from 1370 onwards, creating a strong fortress with eight towers that protected the strategic gateway of the Porte Saint-Antoine on the eastern edge of Paris. The innovative design proved influential in both France and England and was widely copied. The Bastille figured prominently in France's domestic conflicts, including the fighting between the rival factions of the Burgundians and the Armagnacs in the 15th century, and the Wars of Religion in the 16th. The fortress was declared a state prison in 1417; this role was expanded first under the English occupiers of the 1420s and 1430s, and then under Louis XI in the 1460s. The defences of the Bastille were fortified in response to the English and Imperial threat during the 1550s, with a bastion constructed to the east of the fortress. The Bastille played a key role in the rebellion of the Fronde and the battle of the faubourg Saint-Antoine, which was fought beneath its walls in 1652.

— Freebase

Port Royal

Port Royal

a convent founded in 1204, 8 m. SW. of Versailles, and which in the 17th century became the head-quarters of Jansenism (q. v.), and the abode of Antoine Lemaitre, Antoine Arnauld, and others, known as the "Solitaires of the Port Royal." They were distinguished for their austerity, their piety, and their learning, in evidence of which last they established a school of instruction, in connection with which they prepared a series of widely famous educational works.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Lauren

Lauren

A French patronymic surname, a variant of Laurent.

— Wiktionary

Reaumur

Reaumur

of or pertaining to Rene Antoine Ferchault de Reaumur; conformed to the scale adopted by Reaumur in graduating the thermometer he invented

— Webster Dictionary

Saxhorn

Saxhorn

a name given to a numerous family of brass wind instruments with valves, invented by Antoine Joseph Adolphe Sax (known as Adolphe Sax), of Belgium and Paris, and much used in military bands and in orchestras

— Webster Dictionary

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (pronunciation French: République démocratique du Congo [kɔ̃ɡo]), also known as Congo-Kinshasa, Zaire, DR Congo, DRC (the official acronym), the DROC, or simply the Congo, is a country located in Central Africa. It was formerly called Zaire (1971–1997). It is, by area, the largest country in sub-Saharan Africa, the second-largest in all of Africa (after Algeria), and the 11th-largest in the world. With a population of over 84 million, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most populous officially Francophone country in the world, as well as the fourth-most-populous in Africa, and the 16th-most-populous country in the world. Since 2015, the Eastern DR Congo has been the scene of an ongoing military conflict in Kivu. Centred on the Congo Basin, the territory of the DRC was first inhabited by Central African foragers around 90,000 years ago and was reached by the Bantu expansion about 3,000 years ago. In the west, the Kingdom of Kongo ruled around the mouth of the Congo River from the 14th to 19th centuries. In the centre and east, the kingdoms of Luba and Lunda ruled from the 16th and 17th centuries to the 19th century. In the 1870s, just before the onset of the Scramble for Africa, European exploration of the Congo Basin was carried out, first led by Henry Morton Stanley under the sponsorship of Leopold II of Belgium. Leopold formally acquired rights to the Congo territory at the Berlin Conference in 1885 and made the land his private property, naming it the Congo Free State. During the Free State, his colonial military unit, the Force Publique, forced the local population to produce rubber. From 1885 to 1908, millions of the Congolese people died as a consequence of disease and exploitation. In 1908, Leopold, despite his initial reluctance, ceded the so-called Free State to Belgium, thus it became known as the Belgian Congo. Congo achieved independence from Belgium on 30 June 1960 under the name Republic of the Congo. Congolese nationalist Patrice Lumumba was elected the first Prime Minister, while Joseph Kasa-Vubu became the first President. Conflict arose over the administration of the territory, which became known as the Congo Crisis. The provinces of Katanga, under Moïse Tshombe, and South Kasai attempted to secede. After the UN and Western governments refused his requests for aid and Lumumba stated that he was open to any country, including the Soviet Union, for assistance in the crisis, the US and Belgium became wary and oversaw his removal from office by Kasa-Vubu on 5 September and ultimate execution by Belgian-led Katangese troops on 17 January 1961. On 25 November 1965, Army Chief of Staff Joseph-Désiré Mobutu, who later renamed himself Mobutu Sese Seko, officially came into power through a coup d'état. In 1971, he renamed the country Zaire. The country was run as a dictatorial one-party state, with his Popular Movement of the Revolution as the sole legal party. Mobutu's government received considerable support from the United States, due to its anti-communist stance during the Cold War. By the early 1990s, Mobutu's government began to weaken. Destabilisation in the east resulting from the 1994 Rwandan genocide and disenfranchisement among the eastern Banyamulenge (Congolese Tutsi) population led to a 1996 invasion led by Tutsi FPR-ruled Rwanda, which began the First Congo War.On 17 May 1997, Laurent-Désiré Kabila, a leader of Tutsi forces from the province of South Kivu, became President after Mobutu fled to Morocco, reverting the country's name to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Tensions between President Kabila and the Rwandan and Tutsi presence in the country led to the Second Congo War from 1998 to 2003. Ultimately, nine African countries and around twenty armed groups became involved in the war, which resulted in the deaths of 5.4 million people. The two wars devastated the country. President Laurent-Désiré Kabila was assassinated by one of his bodyguards on 16 January 2001 and was succeeded eight days later by his son Joseph, under whom human rights in the country remained poor and included frequent abuses such as forced disappearances, torture, arbitrary imprisonment and restrictions on civil liberties according to NGOs. The Democratic Republic of the Congo is extremely rich in natural resources but has suffered from political instability, a lack of infrastructure, corruption, and centuries of both commercial and colonial extraction and exploitation with little widespread development. Besides the capital Kinshasa, the two next largest cities, Lubumbashi and Mbuji-Mayi are both mining communities. DR Congo's largest export is raw minerals, with China accepting over 50% of DRC's exports in 2012. In 2016, DR Congo's level of human development was ranked 176th out of 187 countries by the Human Development Index. As of 2018, around 600,000 Congolese have fled to neighbouring countries from conflicts in the centre and east of the DRC. Two million

— Wikipedia

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An antonym for "curdled"
  • A. thin
  • B. solidified
  • C. coagulated
  • D. grumous