Synonyms containing la curiosidad mató al gato

We've found 98 synonyms:

Mato Grosso do Sul

Mato Grosso do Sul

Mato Grosso do Sul is one of the states of Brazil. Neighboring Brazilian states are Mato Grosso, Goiás, Minas Gerais, São Paulo and Paraná. It also borders the countries of Paraguay and Bolivia to the west. The economy of the state is largely based on agriculture and cattle-raising. Bisected in the south by the Tropic of Capricorn, Mato Grosso do Sul generally has a warm and humid climate, and is crossed by numerous effluents of the Paraná River. The state is also famous for its natural beauty, and is a major destination for domestic and international tourism. The Pantanal lowlands cover 12 municipalities and presents an enormous variety of flora and fauna, with forests, natural sand banks, savannahs, open pasture, fields and bushes. The city Bonito, in the mountain of Bodoquena, has prehistoric caverns, natural rivers, waterfalls, swimming pools and the Blue Lake cavern. The name "Mato Grosso do Sul" literally means "Thick Forest of the South" in Portuguese, a name inherited from its northern neighbour state of Mato Grosso, of which it was part until the 1970s. It is not uncommon for people to mistakenly refer to Mato Grosso do Sul as simply "Mato Grosso". Other names that were proposed, at the time of the split and afterwards, include "Pantanal" and "Maracaju".

— Freebase

Jaguarundi

Jaguarundi

The jaguarundi, also called eyra cat, is a small-sized wild cat native to Central and South America. In 2002, the IUCN classified the jaguarundi as 'Least Concern', although they considered it likely that no conservation units beyond the megareserves of the Amazon basin could sustain long-term viable populations. It is probably extinct in Texas. Its presence in Uruguay is uncertain. In some Spanish-speaking countries, the jaguarundi is also called gato colorado, gato moro, león brenero, onza, tigrillo, and leoncillo. The Brazilian Portuguese pronunciation of its common English and Portuguese name is IPA. It is also called gato-mourisco, eirá, gato-preto, and maracajá-preto in Portuguese. Jaguarundi comes from Old Tupi yawaum'di.

— Freebase

Mato Grosso

Mato Grosso

Mato Grosso is one of the states of Brazil, the third largest by area, located in the western part of the country. Neighboring states are Rondônia, Amazonas, Pará, Tocantins, Goiás and Mato Grosso do Sul. It also borders Bolivia to the southwest. A state with a flat landscape, alternating great chapadas and plain areas, Mato Grosso presents three different ecosystems: Cerrado, Pantanal and the Amazon Rainforest. The vegetation of the open pasture covers 40% of the state, and the Chapada dos Guimarães National Park, with its caves, grottos, tracks and waterfalls, is one of its great tourist attractions. In the north is the Amazonian forest, with a biodiversity covering half of the state. The Xingu National Park and the Araguaia River are in Mato Grosso. Further south, the Pantanal, the world's largest wetland, is the habitat for almost a thousand species of animals, with many aquatic birds.

— Freebase

Campo Grande

Campo Grande

Campo Grande is the capital and largest city of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul in the Center-West region of the country. The city is nicknamed Cidade Morena because of the reddish-brown colour of the region's soil. It has a population of 796,252, according to a 2011 IBGE estimate, while its metropolitan area is home to 991,420 people. The region where the city is located was in the past a waypoint for travellers who wanted to go from São Paulo or Minas Gerais to northern Mato Grosso by land. In the early 1900s a railway was completed connecting Campo Grande to Corumbá, on the Bolivian border, and to Bauru, São Paulo. Also in the beginning of the 20th century, the Western Brazilian Army Headquarters was established in Campo Grande, making it an important military center. With a population growth from 140,000 people in 1970 to 750,000 people in 2008, Campo Grande is the third largest urban center of the Center-West region, and the 23rd largest city in the country. In 1977, the State of Mato Grosso was split into two, and Campo Grande became the capital of the new state of Mato Grosso do Sul, comprising the southern portion of the former state. By that time, Campo Grande had long surpassed the latter's capital city of Cuiabá in population, which is unusual in Brazil, where most capitals are also the states' largest cities.

— Freebase

Cuiabá

Cuiabá

Cuiabá is the capital city of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso. It is located in the exact centre of South America and forms the metropolitan area of the state, along with the neighbouring town of Várzea Grande. The name is of obscure South American Indian origin, reportedly meaning "arrow-fishing", and alludes to the Bororo custom of using arrows to fish. Another version says that there was an Indian tribe called Ykuiapá. Others say that, while a Portuguese man was once taking a bath in the river using a kind of plate made with half a coconut, the stream carried it away, prompting the man to exclaim "Cuia ba". Cuiabá is the largest centre for tourism, business, agribusiness, trade, and culture in Mato Grosso. The new Marechal Rondon International Airport connects Cuiabá with many Brazilian cities and also operates some international flights. The city is home to the Federal University of Mato Grosso.

— Freebase

Uncaria

Uncaria

Uncaria is a genus of flowering plants in the family Rubiaceae. It has about 40 species. Their distribution is pantropical, with most species native to tropical Asia, three from Africa and the Mediterranean and two from the neotropics. They are known colloquially as Gambier, Cat's Claw or Uña de Gato. The latter two names are shared with several other plants. The type species for the genus is Uncaria guianensis. Indonesian Gambier is a large tropical vine with leaves typical of the genus, being opposite and about 10 cm long. The South American U. tomentosa is called Uña de Gato. Uncaria sinensis is common in China. Uncaria was named in 1789 by Johann von Schreber in his Genera Plantarum edition 8[a]. The genus name is derived from the Latin word uncus, meaning "a hook". It refers to the hooks, formed from reduced branches, that Uncaria vines use to cling to other vegetation. Uncaria is a member of the tribe Nauclea, but its position within that tribe remains unresolved.

— Freebase

Mato Grosso Plateau

Mato Grosso Plateau

The Mato Grosso Plateau (Planalto do Mato Grosso) is a plateau in central Brazil occupying most of the state of Mato Grosso. It contains mostly savanna and woodland. It is an ancient erosional plateau that extends from the border of Goiás state westward to the Parecis plateau, which lies near the Bolivian border. In the south it gives way to floodplains called the Pantanal. The plateau is home to indigenous peoples, such as the Xavante.

— Wikipedia

Rio Verde de Mato Grosso

Rio Verde de Mato Grosso

Rio Verde de Mato Grosso is a municipality located in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. Its population was 20,057 (2005) and its area is 8,152 km².Rio Verde (which means "Green River" in English), how it's popularly called among the people from northern South Mato Grosso, is a small town in the very edge of Serra da Alegria (which means "The Happiness Mountains"), close to the Pantanal of Nhecolândia (which means "The Blissful Burg"), one of the largest on earth. The following closest city is Coxim, an alternative center for backpackers and ecotourists from all over the world. Some of Rio Verde's great attractions are the Sete Quedas (Seven Falls), the Fazenda Igrejinha (Little Church Ranch) and the Jardim dos Tamanudás (Anteaters' Garden).

— Wikipedia

Indigenous

Indigenous

Indigenous is an American blues-rock group that came to prominence in the late 1990s. The band originally consisted of two brothers, Mato Nanji, Pte, along with their sister, Wanbdi, and their cousin, Horse. Their music is heavily influenced by guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan, as well as Jimi Hendrix and Carlos Santana. Mato Nanji's style and skill has drawn comparisons to each of these guitarists. The band has also shared the stage with artists of varying musical genres such as B.B. King, Santana, Bonnie Raitt, Joan Baez, the Indigo Girls, Jackson Browne, Dave Matthews Band, and Los Lonely Boys. The band has headlined its own tours several times. The Nakota Nation members grew up on South Dakota's Yankton Indian Reservation, where their father, Greg Zephier became a spokesperson for Native American rights. A musician in his own right during the 1960s and '70s, Zephier provided his children with records from blues musicians such as B.B. King, Buddy Guy, and Freddie King, and taught them to play their respective instruments. The family started touring together, and soon the children were performing on their own.

— Freebase

MAŤO

MAŤO

The Maťo was an 8-bit personal computer produced in the former Czechoslovakia by Štátny majetok Závadka š.p., Závadka nad Hronom. Their primary goal was to produce a personal computer as cheaply as possible, and therefore it was also sold as a self-assembly kit. It was basically modified PMD 85, but without backward compatibility. This, combined with its late arrival to the market, made the MAŤO a commercial failure.

— Freebase

Gran Chaco

Gran Chaco

The Gran Chaco is a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland natural region of the Río de la Plata basin, divided among eastern Bolivia, Paraguay, northern Argentina and a portion of the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul, where it is connected with the Pantanal region. This land is sometimes called the Chaco Plain.

— Freebase

Pantanal

Pantanal

The Pantanal is one of the world's largest tropical wetland areas, and is located mostly within the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul, but it extends into Mato Grosso and portions of Bolivia and Paraguay. It sprawls over an area estimated at between 140,000 and 195,000 square kilometres. Various subregional ecosystems exist, each with distinct hydrological, geological and ecological characteristics; up to 12 of them have been defined. About 80% of the Pantanal floodplains are submerged during the rainy seasons, nurturing an astonishing biologically diverse collection of aquatic plants and helping to support a dense array of animal species. The name "Pantanal" comes from the Portuguese word pântano, meaning wetland, bog, swamp, quagmire or marsh. By comparison, the Brazilian highlands are locally referred to as the planalto, plateau or, literally, high plain.

— Freebase

Mato Verde

Mato Verde

Mato Verde is a municipality located in the north of the state of Minas Gerais in Brazil. It was founded in 1953. The population was 12,664 as of 2007 and the area was 664 km². The elevation of the city is 541 metres. The postal code is 39527-000. Mato Verde is part of the statistical microregion of Janaúba. It is surrounded by the following municipalities: Monte Azul, Porteirinha, Rio Pardo de Minas, Catuti and Pai Pedro. It is connected by paved road to the regional center of Janaúba to the south. The distance is 80 km. To the north lies the municipality of Monte Azul, a distance of 32 km. The distance to the state capital, Belo Horizonte, is 504 km. The distance to Montes Claros is 226 km. Inadequate rainfall, isolation, and poor soils make this one of the poorest municipalities in the state and in the country. The main economic activities are cattle raising and farming with modest production of cotton, rice, beans, corn, and sorghum. In 2006 there were 1,002 rural producers with a total area of 39,851 hectares. Cropland made up 4,300 hectares and natural pasture 24,500 hectares. There were only 56 tractors a ratio of one for every 200 farms.

— Freebase

Piracema

Piracema

Piracema is the name given to the period of the year when fish within the Paraguay River drainage basin―which includes the Pantanal region in the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul―reproduce. The season lasts from October to March, during which the fish swim upstream to lay their eggs and reproduce. Thus the season is critical for the maintenance of fish populations in the waters of the local rivers and lakes. Both of the Brazilian states prohibit fishing during this period.

— Freebase

Cuiabá

Cuiabá

State capital of Mato Grosso in Brazil.

— Wiktionary

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!