Synonyms containing leave somebody high and dry

We've found 369,845 synonyms:

Dry

Dry

drī, adj. free from, deficient in, moisture, sap: not green: not giving milk: thirsty: uninteresting: (obs.) hard: frigid, precise: free from sweetness and fruity flavour (of wines, &c.).—v.t. to free from water or moisture: to exhaust.—v.i. to become dry, to evaporate entirely—both used also with prep. up:—pr.p. dry′ing; pa.p. dried.—n. and adj. Dry′asdust, the pretended editor or introducer of some of Scott's novels—a synonym for a dull and pedantic though learned person.—v.t. Dry′-beat (Shak.), to beat severely, or so as to be dry.—ns. Dry′-bob, a slang name used at Eton for boys who play cricket, football, &c.—opp. to the Wet-bob, who makes rowing his recreation; Dry′-dock (see Dock).—adj. Dry′-eyed, tearless.—n. Dry′-foot (Shak.), like a dog which pursues game by the scent of its foot.—n.pl. Dry′-goods, drapery, &c., as distinguished from groceries, hardware, &c.—n. Dry′-light, a clear, unobstructed light: an unprejudiced view.—advs. Dry′ly, Drī′ly.—ns. Dry′-meas′ure (see Measure); Dry′ness; Dry′-nurse, a nurse who feeds a child without milk from the breast; Dry′-plate, a sensitised photographic plate, with which a picture may be made without the preliminary use of a bath; Dry′-point, a sharp needle by which fine lines are drawn in copperplate engraving; Dry′-rot, a decay of timber caused by fungi which reduce it to a dry, brittle mass: (fig.) a concealed decay or degeneration.—v.t. Dry′-salt, to cure meat by salting and drying.—ns. Dry′salter, a dealer in gums, dyes, drugs, &c.: (obs.) or in salted or dry meats, pickles, &c.; Dry′saltery.—adj. Dry′-shod, without wetting the shoes or feet.—n. Dry′-steam, steam containing no unevaporated water.—adj. Dry′-stone, built of stone without mortar, as some walls.—n. Dry′-stove, a kind of hot-house for preserving the plants of dry, warm climates.—Cut and dried (see Cut).—High and dry (see High). [A.S. dr['y]ge; cf. Dut. droog, Ger. trocken.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

High

High

hī, adj. elevated: lofty: tall: elevated relatively to something, as upward from a base, in position from the mouth of a river, &c.: eminent in anything: exalted in rank: dignified: chief: noble: ostentatious: arrogant: proud: strong, intensified: extreme in opinion: powerful: angry: loud: violent: tempestuous: shrill: excellent: far advanced: difficult: dear: remote in time: slightly tainted (of game, &c.).—adv. aloft: eminently: powerfully: profoundly: of flesh, on the point of beginning to decay.—ns. High′-ad′miral, a high or chief admiral of a fleet; High′-al′tar, the principal altar in a church; High′-bail′iff, an officer who serves writs, &c., in certain franchises, exempt from the ordinary supervision of the sheriff; High′-bind′er (U.S.), a rowdy, ruffian, blackmailer.—adjs. High′-blest (Milt.), supremely blest or happy; High′-blood′ed, of noble lineage; High′-blown, swelled with wind: (Shak.) inflated, as with pride; High′-born, of high or noble birth; High′-bred, of high or noble breed, training, or family.—ns. High′-church, applied to a party within the Church of England, which exalts the authority of the Episcopate and the priesthood, the saving grace of sacraments, &c. (also adj.); High′-church′ism; High′-church′man.—adj. High′-col′oured, having a strong or glaring colour.—ns. High′-court, a supreme court; High′-cross, a market cross; High′-day, a holiday or festival: (B.) broad daylight.—adj. befitting a festival.—v.t. High′er, to raise higher: to lift.—v.i. to ascend.—n. High′-falū′tin, bombastic discourse.—adj. bombastic: pompous.—adj. High′-fed, fed highly or luxuriously: pampered.—ns. High′-feed′ing; High′-flier, a bird that flies high: one who runs into extravagance of opinion or action.—adjs. High′-flown, extravagant: elevated: turgid; High′-fly′ing, extravagant in conduct or opinion; High′-grown (Shak.), covered with a high growth; High′-hand′ed, overbearing: violent: arbitrary.—n. High′-hand′edness.—adjs. High′-heart′ed, with the heart full of courage; High′-heeled, wearing high heels—of shoes.—n. High′-jinks, boisterous play or jollity: an old Scotch pastime in which persons played various parts under penalty of a forfeit.—adj. High′-kilt′ed, wearing the kilt or petticoat high: indecorous.—n. and adj. High′land, a mountainous district, esp. in pl. that portion of Scotland lying north and west of

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

CleanTie

CleanTie

Whether you are a business person on the road in search of dry cleaners, or a local resident who uses the same dry cleaners each week, CleanTie is about to make your life a whole lot easier. CleanTie, a website created to allow users to locate and schedule dry cleaning services, is the first of its kind in the dry cleaning industry. CleanTie lists all laundromats and dry cleaners in the United States that offer pick up or delivery dry cleaning or laundry services. Using either the website or the free app, users will be able to turn this chore into an easy, stress-free task. It allows you to minimize the time spent on your chores, freeing up some much-needed hours in the day.Cleantie provides its users with the following benefits:Free to use: Users of the site can access the directory for free online, and also can download the free app for their phone or mobile device.Saves time: By showing users exactly which laundromats are closest and provide pick-up and delivery services, users of the site save lots of time and money.Saves money: Users will also be able to save money by using Cleantie. One major benefit is that they will receive up to 5 or 10 percent cash back on any order for the first six months by utilizing select dry cleaners and laundromats.Easy ordering: Cleantie makes dry cleaning easier than ever. Users can quickly set up an order either online, or by using the free app. The app is compatible with iPhone, iPad, Android and Blackberry devices.Business reviews: Utilizing the Cleantie directory, users can review the dry cleaners and laundromats they use. In addition, they are able to read other reviews that other users have posted. This will help better the Cleantie community as a whole, as users will quickly learn to avoid businesses that get poor reviews consistently. It also will motivate businesses to be more accountable.Loyalty program: Cleantie users also have an opportunity to sign up for our loyalty program. Each time you use a Cleantie service provider, you can earn points. Points can be redeemed for free services in the future.

— CrunchBase

Administrative leave

Administrative leave

Administrative leave is a temporary leave from a job assignment, with pay and benefits intact. Generally, the term is reserved for employees of non-business institutions such as schools, police, and hospitals. The definition of administrative leave may vary by institution. Individuals may also be eligible for administrative leave for various reasons including: bereavement, jury/court appearances, military leave, internal reviews, and investigations.In academic settings, administrative leaves are provided for the same purpose as research/study leaves, i.e., to allow individuals to improve themselves academically and to engage in research to foster their effectiveness as teachers and scholars.An employee may be placed on administrative leave when an allegation of misconduct is made against an employee, either by a co-worker, student, parent, an alleged victim, or a police officer. During the leave, employers may investigate the situation before determining an appropriate course of action. Administrative leave does not in itself imply that an employee will be disciplined or that an allegation is credible, which is why pay and benefits are not discontinued. It simply allows the employer to investigate the incident, maintaining the employee's status while at the same time removing them from work, eventually leading to either their return or dismissal.Police officers are routinely placed on administrative leave after a shooting incident while an investigation is conducted, without implying fault on the part of the officer.Whistleblowers may also be placed on administrative leave as a way to protect them from potential harassment of a supervisor. For example, if they report a case of research misconduct from the Principal Investigation of an academic project.

— Wikipedia

Dry well

Dry well

A dry well is an underground structure that disposes of unwanted water, most commonly stormwater runoff, by dissipating it into the ground, where it merges with the local groundwater. Often called a soakaway in the UK. A dry well is a passive structure. Water flows through it under the influence of gravity. A dry well receives water from one or more entry pipes or channels at its top. A dry well discharges the same water through a number of small exit openings distributed over a larger surface area, the side and bottom of the dry well. When a dry well is above the water table, most of its internal volume will contain air. Such a dry well can accept an initial inrush of water very quickly, until the air is displaced. After that, the dry well can only accept water as fast as it can dissipate water. Some dry wells deliberately incorporate a large storage capacity, so that they can accept a large amount of water very quickly and then dissipate it gradually over time, a method that is compatible with the intermittent nature of rainfall. A dry well maintains the connection between its inflow and outflow openings by resisting collapse and resisting clogging. Simple dry wells consist of a pit filled with gravel, riprap, rubble, or other debris. Such pits resist collapse, but do not have much storage capacity because their interior volume is mostly filled by stone. A more advanced dry well defines a large interior storage volume by a reinforced concrete cylinder with perforated sides and bottom. These dry wells are usually buried completely, so that they do not take up any land area. The dry wells for a parking lot's storm drains are usually buried below the same parking lot.

— Freebase

Leave

Leave

lēv, v.t. to allow to remain: to abandon, resign: to quit or depart from: to have remaining at death: to bequeath: to refer for decision.—v.i. to desist: to cease: to depart:—pr.p. leav′ing; pa.t. and pa.p. left.—Leave alone, to let remain undisturbed; Leave in the dark, to conceal information from; Leave off, to desist, to terminate: to give up using; Leave out, to omit.—Get left (coll.), to be beaten or left behind; Take French leave (see French); Take leave, to assume permission: to part, say farewell. [A.S. lǽfan, to leave a heritage (láf), lifian, to be remaining.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Drybrush

Drybrush

Drybrush is a painting technique in which a paint brush that is relatively dry, but still holds paint, is used. Load is applied to a dry support such as paper or primed canvas. The resulting brush strokes have a characteristic scratchy look that lacks the smooth appearance that washes or blended paint commonly have. The drybrush technique can be achieved with both water-based and oil-based media. With water-based media such as inks, acrylic paints, tempera paints or watercolor paints, the brush should be dry or squeezed dry of all water. The brush should then be loaded with paint that is highly viscous or thick. The loaded brush should then be applied to a dry support. With other water-based media, the brush should be loaded with paint then squeezed dry. With oil-based media, such as oil paint, a similar technique may be used, although instead of water, the brush should be dry or squeezed dry of oil and solvent. Because oil paint has a longer drying time than water-based media, brushing over or blending drybrush strokes should be avoided to preserve the distinctive look of the drybrush technique. The technique is frequently used in model painting to apply highlights to miniatures. Oil-based drybrushing can also be scrubbed onto paper, canvas or absorbent gesso with stiff bristle brushes to impart smooth airbrushed or pastel-style effects. Next is that drybrush is sometimes mixed with other painting techniques Coming from the dry brush technique, an autonomous painting technique developed in a comparatively short time:

— Wikipedia

SpotlessCity

SpotlessCity

SpotlessCity is a web-based company that helps people handle all of their dry cleaning and laundry needs online. The website lets users find every dry cleaner and laundromat in their neighborhood and schedule a free pickup & delivery from the cleaner of their choice. SpotlessCity works closely with partner cleaners to build-in accurate pickup & delivery areas, availabilities and processing times for different cleaning services to ensure that users can always schedule valid orders in real-time. A separate administrative site lets partner dry cleaners manage orders and streamlines the pickup & delivery process.SpotlessCity aims to modernize the dry cleaning and laundry industry by enabling local dry cleaners and laundromats to connect with their customers in a brand new way and allowing people to take care of their dry cleaning and laundry with the same ease and convenience with which they order meals, buy groceries or rent movies — online. The company's mission is to make City life more livable — one load of laundry at a time.SpotlessCity is currently available in New York City, but plans to expand to other cities and to offer other household services in the coming months.

— CrunchBase

Dry

Dry

to make dry; to free from water, or from moisture of any kind, and by any means; to exsiccate; as, to dry the eyes; to dry one's tears; the wind dries the earth; to dry a wet cloth; to dry hay

— Webster Dictionary

Sere

Sere

[OE. seer, AS. sear (assumed) fr. searian to wither; akin to D. zoor dry, LG. soor, OHG. sor/n to to wither, Gr. a"y`ein to parch, to dry, Skr. /ush (for sush) to dry, to wither, Zend hush to dry. Ã152. Cf. Austere, Sorrel, a.] Dry; withered; no longer green; -- applied to leaves.

— Webster Dictionary

Dry cell

Dry cell

A dry cell is a type of electric battery, commonly used for portable electrical devices. It was developed in 1886 by the German scientist Carl Gassner, after development of wet zinc-carbon batteries by Georges Leclanché in 1866. The modern version was developed by Japanese Yai Sakizo in 1887. A dry cell uses a paste electrolyte, with only enough moisture to allow current to flow. Unlike a wet cell, a dry cell can operate in any orientation without spilling, as it contains no free liquid, making it suitable for portable equipment. By comparison, the first wet cells were typically fragile glass containers with lead rods hanging from the open top and needed careful handling to avoid spillage. Lead–acid batteries did not achieve the safety and portability of the dry cell until the development of the gel battery. Wet cells have continued to be used for high-drain applications, such as starting internal combustion engines, because inhibiting the electrolyte flow tends to reduce the current capability. A common dry cell is the zinc-carbon cell, sometimes called the dry Leclanché cell, with a nominal voltage of 1.5 volts, the same as the alkaline cell (since both use the same zinc–manganese dioxide combination). A standard dry cell comprises a zinc anode, usually in the form of a cylindrical pot, with a carbon cathode in the form of a central rod. The electrolyte is ammonium chloride in the form of a paste next to the zinc anode. The remaining space between the electrolyte and carbon cathode is taken up by a second paste consisting of ammonium chloride and manganese dioxide, the latter acting as a depolariser. In some designs, often marketed as "heavy duty", the ammonium chloride is replaced with zinc chloride.

— Wikipedia

Administrative leave

Administrative leave

Administrative leave is a temporary leave from a job assignment, with pay and benefits intact. Generally, the term is reserved for employees of non-business institutions such as schools, police, and hospitals. Usually, an employee is placed on administrative leave when an allegation of misconduct is made against an employee, either by a coworker, student or parent, an alleged victim or police officer. During the leave, employers may investigate the situation before determining an appropriate course of action. Administrative leave does not in itself imply that an employee will be disciplined or even that an allegation is credible, which is why pay and benefits are not discontinued. It simply allows the employer to investigate the situation, maintaining the employee's present status while at the same time removing them from the environment, eventually leading to either their return or termination. Other reasons that an employee may be placed on administrative leave may include protecting sensitive information or resources or to remove an employee who may be behaving disruptively pending assessment of a situation. Police officers are routinely placed on administrative leave after a shooting incident while an investigation is conducted, without implying fault on the part of the officer.

— Freebase

Garden leave

Garden leave

Garden leave or gardening leave describes the practice whereby an employee who is leaving a job is instructed to stay away from work during the notice period, while still remaining on the payroll. This practice is often used to prevent employees from taking with them up-to-date information when they leave their current employer, especially when they are leaving to join a competitor. The term originated in the British Civil Service where employees had the right to request special leave for exceptional purposes. "Garden leave" became a euphemism for "suspended" as an employee who was formally suspended pending an investigation into their conduct would often request to be out of the office on special leave instead. The term came to widespread public attention in 1986 when it was used in the BBC sitcom Yes, Prime Minister, episode "One Of Us". Employees continue to receive their normal pay during garden leave and must adhere to their conditions of employment, such as confidentiality, at least until their notice period expires. The term can also refer to the case when an employee is sent home pending disciplinary proceedings, when they are between projects, or when, as a result of publicity, their presence at work is considered counter-productive.

— Freebase

High

High

possessing a characteristic quality in a supreme or superior degree; as, high (i. e., intense) heat; high (i. e., full or quite) noon; high (i. e., rich or spicy) seasoning; high (i. e., complete) pleasure; high (i. e., deep or vivid) color; high (i. e., extensive, thorough) scholarship, etc

— Webster Dictionary

TearScience

TearScience

Headquartered in Morrisville, North Carolina, TearScience has pioneered devices that provide significant clinical identification and treatment of evaporative dry eye. Of the 100 million plus of dry eye sufferers worldwide, the leading cause (86percent) is evaporative dry eye, which is caused by Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD) and a lipid deficiency of the eye's natural tear film. The Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society (TFOS) workshop, involving two years of work by 50 leading experts from around the world, concluded that MGD is an under-estimated condition and is very likely the most frequent cause of dry eye disease. Common symptoms of the disease include eye irritation, dryness, redness, tiredness, and visual disturbances. TearScience's integrated, in-office system enables eye care professionals to effectively address a root cause of evaporative dry eye.

— CrunchBase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. threadlike
  • B. thready
  • C. thick
  • D. fibrous