Synonyms containing lettuce leaf

We've found 2,260 synonyms:

Lettuce

Lettuce

Lettuce is an annual plant of the aster or sunflower family Asteraceae. It is most often grown as a leaf vegetable, but sometimes for its stem and seeds. Lettuce was first cultivated by the ancient Egyptians who turned it from a weed, whose seeds were used to produce oil, into a plant grown for its leaves. Lettuce spread to the Greeks and Romans, the latter of whom gave it the name "lactuca", from which the English "lettuce" is ultimately derived. By 50 AD, multiple types were described, and lettuce appeared often in medieval writings, including several herbals. The 16th through 18th centuries saw the development of many varieties in Europe, and by the mid-18th century cultivars were described that can still be found in gardens. Europe and North America originally dominated the market for lettuce, but by the late 1900s the consumption of lettuce had spread throughout the world. Generally grown as a hardy annual, lettuce is easily cultivated, although it requires relatively low temperatures to prevent it from flowering quickly. It can be plagued with numerous nutrient deficiencies, as well as insect and mammal pests and fungal and bacterial diseases. L. sativa crosses easily within the species and with some other species within the Lactuca genus; although this trait can be a problem to home gardeners who attempt to save seeds, biologists have used it to broaden the gene pool of cultivated lettuce varieties. World production of lettuce and chicory for calendar year 2010 stood at 23,620,000 metric tons, over half of which came from China.

— Freebase

Montia

Montia

Montia is a genus of plants in the purslane family, Montiaceae. Species in this genus are known generally as miner's lettuce or minerslettuce. Montia perfoliata, the species for which the term miner's lettuce was coined, is distributed throughout the Mountain West of North America in moist soils and prefers areas which have been recently disturbed. The species got its name due to its use as a fresh salad green by miners in the 1849 Gold Rush in California. Some members formerly of this genus are now considered to belong in Claytonia. The genus is being reorganized by taxonomists. Selected species: ⁕Montia bostockii - Bostock's miner's lettuce ⁕Montia chamissoi - water miner's lettuce, toadlily ⁕Montia dichotoma - dwarf miner's lettuce ⁕Montia diffusa - spreading miner's lettuce, branching montia ⁕Montia fontana - annual water miner's lettuce, water-blinks ⁕Montia howellii - Howell's miner's lettuce ⁕Montia linearis - narrowleaf miner's lettuce ⁕Montia parvifolia - littleleaf miner's lettuce

— Freebase

Leaf

Leaf

lēf, n. one of the lateral organs developed from the stem or axis of the plant below its growing-point: anything beaten thin like a leaf: two pages of a book: one side of a window-shutter, &c.:—pl. Leaves (lēvz).—v.i. to shoot out or produce leaves:—pr.p. leaf′ing; pa.p. leafed.—ns. Leaf′age, leaves collectively: abundance of leaves: season of leaves or leafing; Leaf′-bridge, a form of drawbridge in which the rising leaf or leaves swing vertically on hinges; Leaf′-bud, a bud producing a stem with leaves only; Leaf′iness; Leaf′-in′sect, an orthopterous insect of family Phasmidæ, the wing-covers like leaves.—adj. Leaf′less, destitute of leaves.—ns. Leaf′let, a little leaf, a tract; Leaf′-met′al, metal, especially alloys imitating gold and silver, in very thin leaves, for decoration; Leaf′-mould, earth formed from decayed leaves, used as a soil for plants; Leaf′-stalk, the petiole supporting the leaf.—adj. Leaf′y, full of leaves.—Take a leaf out of one's book (see Book); Turn over a new leaf, to take up a new and better course of conduct. [A.S. leáf; Ger. laub, Dut. loof, a leaf.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Crownshaft

Crownshaft

An elongated circumferential leaf base formation present on some species of palm is called a crownshaft. The leaf bases of some pinnate leaved palms (most notable being Roystonea regia or the royal palm but also including the genera Areca, Wodyetia and Pinanga) form a sheath at the top of the trunk surrounding the bud where all the subsequent leaves are formed.The crownshaft takes the form of a column above the main trunk and beneath the main crown of leaves and is nothing but the collection of the leaf bases of the plant, all tightly wrapped around one another. It is usually green in color but may be a different color from that of the leaves themselves, including white, blue, red, brownish or orange. Each layer of the crownshaft is a distinct leaf base and is usually made of a tough fibrous material with a feel similar to leather and in many parts of the world, it is cured and used to prepare covers, sheets and roofing material. The leaf base of some palms are also used to extract coir. The oldest leaf forms the outermost layer of the crownshaft. Eventually the lowest palm frond dies back, the outer layer of the crownshaft splits, the leaf unwraps and pulls away from the trunk exposing the new crownshaft surface. In time the old leaf separates at the base and falls away leaving the distinct rings and ridges of the leafbase scars seen on the trunks of many species of palm. These scars usually fade over time and the distance between two successive scars is an approximate indicator of the speed of growth of the palm. In tropical conditions when growing conditions are good, the palm grows faster and the gap between scars is large; conversely when growing conditions are not optimum, plant growth is slow and the gaps are narrower. Juveniles and younger palms usually grow faster than adults; this is demonstrated by the larger gaps between scars at the base as compared to the top. In some species of palm the shaft is fairly indistinct because the leaf bases are not wrapped around each other very tightly, and the shaft becomes extended and “loose.” Some palm species do not form a shaft until past the juvenile stage.

— Wikipedia

Sea lettuce

Sea lettuce

The sea lettuces comprise the genus Ulva, a group of edible green algae that is widely distributed along the coasts of the world's oceans. The type species within the genus Ulva is Ulva lactuca, lactuca being Latin for "lettuce". The genus also includes the species previously classified under the genus Enteromorpha, the former members of which are known under the common name green nori. Sea lettuce is eaten by a number of different sea animals, including manatees and the sea slugs known as sea hares. Many species of sea lettuce are a food source for humans in Scandinavia, Great Britain, Ireland, China, and Japan. Sea lettuce as a food for humans is eaten raw in salads and cooked in soups. It is high in protein, soluble dietary fiber, and a variety of vitamins and minerals, especially iron. Individual blades of Ulva can grow to be more than 400mm in size, but this only occurs when the plants are growing in sheltered areas. In August 2009, unprecedented amounts of these algae washed up on the beaches of Brittany, France, causing a major public health scare as it decomposed. The rotting leaves produced large quantities of hydrogen sulphide, a toxic gas. In one incident near Saint-Michel-en-Grève, a horse rider lost consciousness and his horse died after breathing the seaweed fumes; in another, a lorry driver driving a load of decomposing sea lettuce passed out, crashed and died, with toxic fumes claimed to be the cause. Environmentalists blamed the phenomenon on excessive use of nitrates by pig and poultry farmers.

— Freebase

Celtuce

Celtuce

Celtuce, also called stem lettuce, celery lettuce, asparagus lettuce, or Chinese lettuce, IPA, is a cultivar of lettuce grown primarily for its thick stem, used as a vegetable. It is especially popular in China, and is called wosun or woju. The stem is usually harvested at a length of around 15–20 cm and a diameter of around 3–4 cm. It is crisp, moist, and mildly flavored, and typically prepared by slicing and then stir frying with more strongly flavored ingredients.

— Freebase

Leaf vegetable

Leaf vegetable

Leaf vegetables, also called leafy greens, salad greens, pot herbs, vegetable greens, or simply greens, are plant leaves eaten as a vegetable, sometimes accompanied by tender petioles and shoots. Although they come from a very wide variety of plants, most share a great deal with other leaf vegetables in nutrition and cooking methods. Nearly one thousand species of plants with edible leaves are known. Leaf vegetables most often come from short-lived herbaceous plants, such as lettuce and spinach. Woody plants of various species also provide edible leaves. The leaves of many fodder crops are also edible for humans, but are usually only eaten under famine conditions. Examples include alfalfa, clover, most grasses, including wheat and barley. These plants are often much more prolific than traditional leaf vegetables, but exploitation of their rich nutrition is difficult, due to their high fiber content. This can be overcome by further processing such as drying and grinding into powder or pulping and pressing for juice. Leaf vegetables contain many typical plant nutrients, but since they are photosynthetic tissues, their vitamin K levels are particularly notable. Phylloquinone, the most common form of the vitamin, is directly involved in photosynthesis. This causes leaf vegetables to be the primary food class that interacts significantly with the anticoagulant warfarin.

— Wikipedia

romaine

romaine

Lactuca sativa longifolia, a type of lettuce having long crisp leaves forming a slender head. Also known as Romaine lettuce, Cos lettuce, or Cos, after the Greek island of Cos (Kos).

— Wiktionary

Leaf

Leaf

Leaf is a two year-old and rapidly growing tech company at the forefront of the revolution in changing the way brick and mortar merchants do business. Leaf believes that technology can (and should) enhance the customer experience, and that learning from your own business’ data is the best way to grow a small business.Leaf’s purpose is to help small business owners across the nation fight against the giants. They help small business owners not only grow their businesses using their own performance data, but also improve the way they connect with their customers. Leaf delivers digital receipts, integrate across social networks, capture real-time customer feedback, and frequently participate in charity, all in an effort to have consumers experience greater convenience and rewards while at the same time making a global difference.

— CrunchBase

Slek

Slek

The slek (Khmer: ស្លឹក) is a musical instrument of country people in Cambodia, made from the leaves of broad-leaf trees, including the sakrom and khnoung trees. It is also known as phlom slek, "blow leaf." To play a leaf, the musician curls the edge of a leaf into a semi-circle (along the leaf's long edge) and "places the arch between the lips", making sure that the leaf is touching both upper and lower lips. The leaf vibrates in contact with them as the player blows air across it. The player can control the pitch of the noise with his upper lip.An instrument of country people, it has been observed being played by herders riding their water buffalo in the rice fields. While it is used to imitate sounds wild animals make, it can produce sustained sound, a sharp, high-pitched whistle. Players can control the pitch and make songs, normally solo, but sometimes with other instruments.

— Wikipedia

Leaf gap

Leaf gap

A leaf gap is a space in the stem of a plant through which the leaf grows. The leaf is connected to the stem by the leaf trace, which grows through the leaf gap. The leaf gap is a break in the vascular tissue of a stem above the point of attachment of a leaf trace. It exists in the nodal region of the stem as a "gap in the continuity of the primary vascular cylinder above the level where a leaf trace diverges toward a leaf. This gap is filled with parenchyma tissue".

— Freebase

Four-leaf clover

Four-leaf clover

The four-leaf clover is an uncommon variation of the common, three-leaved clover. According to tradition, such leaves bring good luck to their finders, especially if found accidentally. In addition, each leaf is believed to represent something: the first is for faith, the second is for hope, the third is for love, and the fourth is for luck. It has been estimated that there are approximately 10,000 three-leaf clovers for every four-leaf clover; however, this probability has not deterred collectors who have reached records as high as 160,000 four-leaf clovers. Clovers can have more than four leaves: the most ever recorded is 56, discovered by Shigeo Obara of Morioka, Japan, on May 12, 2009. Five-leaf clovers are less commonly found naturally than four-leaf clovers; however, they, too, have been successfully cultivated. Children are traditionally told that a five-leaved clover is even luckier than a four-leaved one. Some four-leaf clover collectors, particularly in Ireland, regard the five-leaf clover, known as a rose clover as a particular prize.

— Freebase

Lactuca

Lactuca

Lactuca, commonly known as lettuce, is a genus of flowering plants in the daisy family Asteraceae. The genus includes about 100 species, distributed worldwide, but mainly in temperate Eurasia. Its best-known representative is the garden lettuce, with its many varieties. "Wild lettuce" commonly refers to the wild-growing cousins of common garden lettuce. Many species are common weeds. They are annuals or perennials. Their height can vary between 10 and 180 cm. They form heads or capitula in panicles of yellow, brown or purple flowers in ray florets. The non-edible species may contain bitter elements. Lactuca species are used as food plants by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species – see list of Lepidoptera that feed on lettuces.

— Freebase

Xiphos

Xiphos

The xiphos ( KSEE-fohss; Greek: ξίφος) is a double-edged, one-handed Iron Age straight shortsword used by the ancient Greeks. It was a secondary battlefield weapon for the Greek armies after the dory or javelin. The classic blade was generally about 45–60 cm (18-24 in) long, although the Spartans supposedly started to use blades as short as 30 cm (11.8 in) around the era of the Greco-Persian Wars. The xiphos sometimes has a midrib, and is diamond or lenticular in cross-section. It was generally hung from a baldric under the left arm. The xiphos was generally used only when the spear was broken, taken by the enemy, or discarded for close combat. Very few xiphoi seem to have survived. Stone's Glossary has the xiphos being a name used by Homer for a sword. The entry in the book says that the sword had a double-edged blade widest at about two-thirds of its length from the point, and ending in a very long point. The name xiphos apparently means something in the way of "penetrating light" according to researcher and swordsmith Peter Johnsson.The xiphos' leaf-shaped design lent itself to both cutting and thrusting. The design has most likely been in existence since the appearance of the first swords. Blades in bronze and iron are suitable for a leaf shape due to the softness of the metals in comparison to steel. Bronze swords are cast and are thus more easily formed into a leaf shape than iron swords, which need to be forged. The early xiphos was a bronze sword, and in the classical period, would have been made of iron. The early Celtic La Tène short sword, contemporary with the xiphos, had a virtually identical blade design as the xiphos.The leaf-shaped short swords were not limited to Greece, as mentioned, but can be found throughout Europe in the late Bronze Age under various names. Bronze leaf-shaped swords from as early as the late second millennium still survive. The Urnfield culture is associated with the use of the leaf shaped bronze short sword. It is generally thought that iron swords had replaced bronze swords by the early La Tène culture about 500BC. During the Halstatt culture a mixture of bronze and iron swords seem to have existed side by side. Iron tends to become severely oxidized (rusted) over the years, and few iron swords have survived, in contrast to bronze swords that age very well. Thus, much is known regarding the sword during the Bronze Age but less so in the early Iron Age. Bronze thrusting swords from the second millennium still exist in excellent condition. The word is attested in Mycenaean Greek Linear B form as

— Wikipedia

Pepes

Pepes

Pepes is an Indonesian cooking method using banana leaf as food wrappings. The banana-leaf package containing food is secured with lidi seumat (a small nail made from central rib of coconut-leaf), and then steamed or grilled on charcoal. This cooking technique allows the rich spice mixture to be compressed against the main ingredients inside the individual banana leaf package while being cooked, and also adds a distinct aroma of cooked or burned banana leaf. Although being cooked simultaneously with food, the banana leaf is a non-edible material and is discarded after cooking.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. new
  • B. well-worn
  • C. commonplace
  • D. hackneyed