Synonyms containing merit shop

We've found 1,744 synonyms:

Shop

Shop

shop, n. a building in which goods are sold by retail: a place where mechanics work, or where any kind of industry is pursued: one's own business or profession, also talk about such.—v.i. to visit shops for the purpose of buying.—v.t. (slang) to imprison:—pr.p. shop′ping; pa.p. shopped.—ns. Shop′-bell, a small automatic bell hung to give notice of the opening of a shop-door; Shop′-board, a bench on which work, esp. that of tailors, is done; Shop′-boy, -girl, a boy or girl employed in a shop; Shop′-keeper, one who keeps a shop for the sale of goods by retail; Shop′keeping, the business of keeping a shop; Shop′-lift′er; Shop′-lift′ing, lifting or stealing anything from a shop; Shop′man, one who serves in a shop: a shopkeeper; Shopoc′racy, shopkeepers collectively; Shop′ping, the act of visiting shops to see and buy goods.—adj. Shop′py, commercial: abounding in shops: given to talking shop: concerning one's own pursuit.—ns. Shop′-walk′er, one who walks about in a shop and sees the customers attended to; Shop′woman, a woman employed in a shop.—adj. Shop′-worn, somewhat tarnished by being exposed in a shop.—Fancy shop, a shop where fancy goods are sold.—Shut up shop (coll.), to abandon any enterprise; The other shop (slang), a rival institution or establishment; The whole shop (slang), entirely; Talk shop (coll.), to converse unseasonably about one's own profession. [A.S. sceoppa, a treasury (influenced by O. Fr. eschoppe, a stall.)]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Merit shop

Merit shop

A merit shop is a firm or organization whose employees have chosen to perform hiring, promotion, salary adjustments, bonuses and termination based on the laws of the state and federal government, along with the individual's ability to accomplish the tasks assigned to them by their employer. These decisions will not be biased by age, race, national origin, organizational affiliation, seniority, color, creed and sex. The term "Merit Shop" was coined by John Trimmer, who served from 1952 to 1976 as an officer of the Associated Builders and Contractors, an American trade association consisting primarily of non-union construction contractors. In common usage, "merit shop" is often synonymous with being non-union or open shop. There are many other organizations that represent merit shop companies. For example, the Independent Electrical Contractors represents almost 3,000 open shop electrical and systems contractors in the USA, while also offering apprentice training, as recognized by the Department of Labor. Founded in 1957, the organization represents its member companies' small business and merit shop interests at the national, state, and local levels of government. Other merit shop-oriented associations include the Association of Merit Shop Craftsmen and the Merit Shop Roundtable.

— Freebase

Merit badge

Merit badge

Merit badges are awards earned by youth members of the Boy Scouts of America, based on activities within an area of study by completing a list of periodically updated requirements. The purpose of the merit badge program is to allow Scouts to examine subjects to determine if they would like to further pursue them as a career or avocation. Originally, the program also introduced Scouts to the life skills of contacting an adult they hadn't met before, arranging a meeting and then demonstrating their skills, similar to a job or college interview. Increasingly, though, merit badges are earned in a class setting at troop meetings and summer camps. Each merit badge has a pamphlet published by the Boy Scouts of America associated with it; the pamphlet contains information on completing the requirements for the badge. Scouts must meet up with their Scoutmaster to receive a signed blue card in order to begin working on a merit badge. The Scout then contacts an adult who is registered as a counselor for that merit badge in order to learn which badge requirements they must complete before meeting up with the counselor. Once these requirements are completed, the Scout meets with the counselor to demonstrate that he's completed the requirements. The counselor then 'signs off' on each requirement. After completing the merit badge, the Scout can then buy his merit badge patch.

— Freebase

Second-hand shop

Second-hand shop

A second-hand shop is a shop which sells goods that are not new. There are various types of second-hand shop, generally specialising in a particular type of merchandise. Antique shop - sells the same type of goods, either of better quality or with rarity value, consequently charging much higher prices. The distinction between junk and antiques is not always clear-cut. Charity shop - similar to a junk shop but set up to fund a specific charity. These tend to specialise in clothes. The quality of the clothes donated for sale depends on the surrounding area. In the United States, these are called thrift stores. Consignment - consignment shop is the North American term for a second-hand shop. Give-away shop - everything is given away at no cost. Some operate as swap shops and require the customer to donate merchandise. Junk shop - sells all kinds of old goods. The best junk shops are piled high to encourage browsing and bargain hunting. These shops also sell low-quality antiques. Surplus store - often sells military surplus supplies. Used bookstore - sells used books and other publications. Second-hand bookshops are a mainstay of book towns.

— Freebase

Merit

Merit

mer′it, n. excellence that deserves honour or reward: worth: value: that which one has earned.—v.t. to earn: to have a right to claim as a reward: to deserve: (pl., in law) the right or wrong of a case, apart from questions of procedure.—adj. Meritō′rious, possessing merit or desert: deserving of reward, honour, or praise.—adv. Meritō′riously.—n. Meritō′riousness.—Order for merit, a Prussian order, the military class founded by Frederick the Great in 1740—the civil class, by Frederick William IV. in 1842 for eminence in science and art; Order of merit, place in a class or list in which the best is placed first, the next best second, and so on. [Fr.,—L. meritummerēre, -ĭtum, to obtain as a lot, to deserve.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Shop fitting

Shop fitting

Shop fitting (shopfitting) is the trade of fitting out retail and service shops and stores with equipment, fixtures and fittings. The trade applies to all kinds of outlets from small corner shops to hypermarkets. A shop fitter executes planning, designs shop layout and installs equipment and services. A shop fitting firm typically incorporates professional expertise in interior design, manufacturing of bespoke furniture, signage and fittings (with own or outsourced facilities) and purchasing of retail equipment. A shop fitting cycle begins with a survey and measurement of available space and preparing design drawings for submission to the client. Alternatively, the client may have their own drawings prepared by an independent interior designer. The shop fitter arranges for purchase of standard equipment and merchandise or production of bespoke furniture, delivers and physically installs them—until the shop is ready for daily operation. There are different requirements to the different branches and types of shop. Fashion shop design requires up-to-the-minute awareness of current trends in colour and style to create stores that will draw customers in.

— Wikipedia

Merit

Merit

Merit is a concept in Buddhism/Hinduism. It is that which accumulates as a result of good deeds, acts, or thoughts and which carries over to throughout the life or the subsequent incarnations. Such merit contributes to a person's growth towards spiritual liberation. Merit can be gained in a number of ways. In addition, according to the Mahayana Sutra of The Great Vows of Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva, one can "transfer" 1/7 merit of an act they have performed to a deceased loved one such as in the Shitro practice in order to diminish the deceased's suffering in their new existence. Pariṇāmanā may be rendered as 'transfer of merit' or 'dedication' and involves the transfer of merit as a cause to bring about an effect.

— Freebase

Literary merit

Literary merit

Literary merit is the quality shared by all works of fiction that are considered to have aesthetic value. The concept of "literary merit" has been criticized as being necessarily subjective, since personal taste determines aesthetic value, and has been derided as a "relic of a scholarly elite". Despite these criticisms, many criteria have been suggested to determine literary merit including: standing the test of time, realistic characters, emotional complexity, originality, and concern with truth. In 1957, at the obscenity trial for Howl, author Walter Van Tilburg Clark was prodded into defining literary merit. His response outlines some of the popular criteria: The only final test, it seems to me, of literary merit, is the power to endure. Obviously such a test cannot be applied to a new or recent work, and one cannot, I think, offer soundly an opinion on the probability of endurance save on a much wider acquaintance with the work or works of a writer than I have of Mr. Ginsberg's or perhaps even with a greater mass of production than Mr. Ginsberg's. ... Aside from this test of durability, I think the test of literary merit must be, to my mind, first, the sincerity of the writer.

— Freebase

Pop Shop

Pop Shop

The Pop Shop were stores that sold voluminous memorabilia of artist Keith Haring's designs. Haring originally opened two Pop Shops; one at 292 Lafayette Street in SoHo and one in Tokyo. Every area of the store was devoted to Haring's work including floor-to-ceiling murals, which provided a clubhouse atmosphere. The Tokyo Pop Shop, shipped from Tokyo to Europe was recently restored and exhibited in Saint Tropez, France by art publisher George Mulder of Berlin. Keith Haring's Pop Shop served to fulfill the artist's desire to make his iconic and beloved imagery accessible to the widest possible range of people both during his lifetime and posthumously through the Keith Haring Foundation, Inc. Haring, who viewed the Pop Shop as an extension of his work, stated: "Here's the philosophy behind the Pop Shop: I wanted to continue the same sort of communication as with the subway drawings. I wanted to attract the same wide range of people and I wanted it to be a place where, yes, not only collectors could come, but also kids from the Bronx … this was still an art statement." Graffiti kids from the Bronx did hang out at the New York Pop Shop, along with Soho art types, Madonna, and others. Photographer Tseng Kwong Chi recorded many events related to the creation of the Tokyo Pop Shop.

— Freebase

Shop drawing

Shop drawing

A shop drawing is a drawing or set of drawings produced by the contractor, supplier, manufacturer, subcontractor, or fabricator. Shop drawings are typically required for prefabricated components. Examples of these include: elevators, structural steel, trusses, pre-cast concrete, windows, appliances, cabinets, air handling units, and millwork. Also critical are the installation and coordination shop drawings of the MEP trades such as sheet metal ductwork, piping, plumbing, fire protection, and electrical. Shop drawings are produced by contractors and suppliers under their contract with the owner. The shop drawing is the manufacturer’s or the contractor’s drawn version of information shown in the construction documents. The shop drawing normally shows more detail than the construction documents. It is drawn to explain the fabrication and/or installation of the items to the manufacturer’s production crew or contractor's installation crews. The style of the shop drawing is usually very different from that of the architect’s drawing. The shop drawing’s primary emphasis is on the particular product or installation and excludes notation concerning other products and installations, unless integration with the subject product is necessary.

— Wikipedia

Artistic merit

Artistic merit

Artistic merit is a term that is used in relation to cultural products when referring to the judgment of their perceived quality or value as works of art. Artistic merit is a crucial term, as pertains to visual art. However, many people fail to distinguish between the problem of distinguishing art from non-art and the problem of distinguishing good art from bad art. In many cases, people claim that such-and-such object is "not art" or "not real art" when they intend to say that they do not consider it to be good or successful art. In Western Europe and its daughter societies from around 1500 to 1870, artistic merit was closely related to faithfulness to nature and sometimes narrative coherence and obedience to classical precepts. This criterion, however, has failed for painting with the rise of photography and film. In general, rigid criteria for artistic merit tend to fall apart fairly rapidly and the preferred standards for artistic merit ary across time and place.

— Freebase

Antique shop

Antique shop

An antique shop is a retail store specializing in the selling of antiques. Antiques shops can be located either locally and with the advent of the Internet found online. An online Antique shop can also be located within an Antique Mall, where an individual Antique seller can open a shop and display their items for sell within the mall. Normally their stock is sourced from auctions, estate sales, searching at flea markets or garage sales, etc. Many items may in fact pass through multiple antique dealers along the product chain before arriving in a retail antique shop. By their very nature, they sell unique items and are typically willing to buy items, even from individuals. The quality of these items may vary from very low to extremely high and expensive, depending on the nature and location of the shop. Frequently many antique shops will be clustered together in nearby locations; in the same town such as in many places in New England, on the same street such as on Portobello Road in London, or even all under the same roof in one antique mall, though frequently in that case it may be referred to as a stall rather than shop, especially if that antique dealer has another larger non-mall location.

— Freebase

Figure of Merit

Figure of Merit

In the case of a galvanometer, a coefficient expressing its delicacy. It is the reciprocal of the current required to deflect the needle through one degree. By using the reciprocal the smaller the current required the larger is the figure of merit. The same term may be applied to other instruments.

It is often defined as the resistance of a circuit through which one Daniell's element will produce a deflection of one degree on the scale of the instrument. The circuit includes a Daniell's cell of resistance r, a rheostat R, galvanometer G and shunt S. Assume that with the shunt in parallel a deflection of a divisions is obtained. The resistance of the shunted galvanometer is (GS/G+S ; the multiplying power m of the shunt is S+G/S; the formula or figure of merit is m d (r+R +G S/G+S).

The figure of merit is larger as the instrument is more sensitive. Synonym--Formula of Merit.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Scene shop

Scene shop

A scenery shop or scene shop is a specialized workshop found in many medium or large theaters, as well as many educational theatre settings. The primary function of a scene shop is to fabricate and assemble the flats, platforms, scenery wagons, and other scenic (set) pieces required for a performance. Commonly, a scene shop is also the location where most of the set painting is done, and is sometimes used to make props. Generally, the individuals who work in a scene shop are carpenters, although, in bigger shops, it is common for metalworkers to be employed for steel-construction set pieces which require welding and other machining. It is common for the individuals working in a scene shop to be knowledgeable in a wide variety of technical skills, developed over time as required for specific construction needs.

— Wikipedia

Legion of Merit

Legion of Merit

The Legion of Merit is a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The decoration is issued both to United States military personnel and to military and political figures of foreign governments. The Legion of Merit is one of only two United States military decorations to be issued as a neck order and the only United States decoration which may be issued in award degrees. The Legion of Merit is sixth in the order of precedence of U.S. Military awards and is worn after the Defense Superior Service Medal and before the Distinguished Flying Cross. In contemporary use in the U.S. Armed Forces, the Legion of Merit is typically awarded to Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force general officers and colonels, and Navy and Coast Guard flag officers and captains occupying command or very senior staff positions in their respective services. It may also be awarded to officers of lesser rank and senior enlisted personnel, but these instances are less frequent and circumstances vary by service. As such, the medal can be considered as "points" in some enlisted promotion systems, such as the Air Force, where it is counted as seven points.

— Freebase

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A synonym of "dry"
  • A. sodden
  • B. drippy
  • C. steamy
  • D. juiceless