Synonyms containing monsel's solution

We've found 3,761 synonyms:

Raoult's law

Raoult's law

Raoult's law ( law) is a law of thermodynamics established by French chemist François-Marie Raoult in 1887. It states that the partial vapor pressure of each component of an ideal mixture of liquids is equal to the vapour pressure of the pure component multiplied by its mole fraction in the mixture. In consequence, the relative lowering of vapour pressure of a dilute solution of nonvolatile solute is equal to the mole fraction of solute in the solution. Mathematically, Raoult's law for a single component in an ideal solution is stated as p i = p i ⋆ x i , {\displaystyle p_{i}=p_{i}^{\star }x_{i},} where p i {\displaystyle p_{i}} is the partial pressure of the component i {\displaystyle i} in the gaseous mixture (above the solution), p i ⋆ {\displaystyle p_{i}^{\star }} is the vapor pressure of the pure component i {\displaystyle i} , and x i {\displaystyle x_{i}} is the mole fraction of the component i {\displaystyle i} in the mixture (in the solution).Once the components in the solution have reached equilibrium, the total vapor pressure of the solution can be determined by combining Raoult's law with Dalton's law of partial pressures to give p = p A ⋆ x A + p B ⋆ x B + ⋯ {\displaystyle p=p_{\text{A}}^{\star }x_{\text{A}}+p_{\text{B}}^{\star }x_{\text{B}}+\cdots } If a non-volatile solute (zero vapor pressure, does not evaporate) is dissolved into a solvent to form an ideal solution, the vapor pressure of the final solution will be lower than that of the solvent.

— Wikipedia

Solution architecture

Solution architecture

Solution architecture is a combination of role, process and documentation that is intended to address specific problems and requirements, usually through the design of specific information systems or applications. The term solution architecture can be used to mean either or both: Documentation describing the structure and behaviour of a solution to a problem, or A process for describing a solution and the work to deliver it. The documentation is typically divided into broad views, each known as an architecture domain. Where the solution architect starts and stops work depends on the funding model for the process of solution identification and delivery. E.g. An enterprise may employ a solution architect on a feasibility study, or to prepare a solution vision or solution outline for an Invitation to Tender. A systems integrator may employ a solution architect at “bid time”, before any implementation project is costed and resourced. Both may employ a solution architect to govern an implementation project, or play a leading role within it. Typical outcomes of solution architecture.

— Freebase

Strong electrolyte

Strong electrolyte

A strong electrolyte is a solution/solute that completely, or almost completely, ionizes or dissociates in a solution. These ions are good conductors of electric current in the solution. Originally, a "strong electrolyte" was defined as a chemical that, when in aqueous solution, is a good conductor of electricity. With a greater understanding of the properties of ions in solution, its definition was replaced by the present one. A concentrated solution of this strong electrolyte has a lower vapor pressure than that of pure water at the same temperature. Strong acids, strong bases and soluble ionic salts that are not weak acids or weak bases are strong electrolytes. A substance whose aqueous solution or molten state decomposed into ions by passing electricity is known as electrolytes.

— Wikipedia

Hill climbing

Hill climbing

In computer science, hill climbing is a mathematical optimization technique which belongs to the family of local search. It is an iterative algorithm that starts with an arbitrary solution to a problem, then attempts to find a better solution by incrementally changing a single element of the solution. If the change produces a better solution, an incremental change is made to the new solution, repeating until no further improvements can be found. For example, hill climbing can be applied to the travelling salesman problem. It is easy to find an initial solution that visits all the cities but will be very poor compared to the optimal solution. The algorithm starts with such a solution and makes small improvements to it, such as switching the order in which two cities are visited. Eventually, a much shorter route is likely to be obtained. Hill climbing is good for finding a local optimum but it is not guaranteed to find the best possible solution out of all possible solutions. The characteristic that only local optima are guaranteed can be cured by using restarts, or more complex schemes based on iterations, like iterated local search, on memory, like reactive search optimization and tabu search, on memory-less stochastic modifications, like simulated annealing.

— Freebase

Monsel's solution

Monsel's solution

an aqueous solution of Monsel's salt, having valuable styptic properties

— Webster Dictionary

Precipitate

Precipitate

prē-sip′i-tāt, v.t. to throw head-foremost: to urge with eagerness: to hurry rashly: to hasten: (chem.) to cause to fall to the bottom, as a substance in solution or suspension.—v.i. to fall headlong: to make too great haste.—adj. falling, flowing, or rushing headlong: lacking deliberation: overhasty: (med.) ending soon in death.—n. (chem.) a part of a solution, falling or causing to fall to the bottom.—n. Precipitabil′ity.—adj. Precip′itable (chem.), that may be precipitated.—ns. Precip′itance, Precip′itancy, quality of being precipitate: haste in resolving or executing a purpose.—adj. Precip′itant, falling headlong: rushing down with too great velocity: hasty: unexpectedly brought on.—n. anything that causes part of a solution to fall to the bottom.—advs. Precip′itantly; Precip′itātely, in a precipitate manner: headlong: without due thought.—n. Precipitā′tion, act of precipitating: great hurry: rash haste: rapid movement: (chem.) the process by which any substance is made to separate from another in solution, and fall to the bottom.—adj. Precip′itātive.—n. Precipitā′tor, one who, or that which, precipitates or causes precipitation.—Precipitate ointment is of two kinds, red and white—the former containing red oxide of mercury, the latter ammoniated mercury. [L. præcipitāre, -ātumpræceps.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dilution

Dilution

Dilution is a reduction in the concentration of a chemical. It is the process of reducing the concentration of a solute in solution, usually simply by mixing with more solvent. To dilute a solution means to add more solvent without the addition of more solute. The resulting solution is thoroughly mixed so as to ensure that all parts of the solution are identical. The same direct relationship applies to gases and vapors diluted in air for example. Although, thorough mixing of gases and vapors may not be as easily accomplished. For example, if there are 10 grams of salt dissolved in 1 litre of water, this solution has a certain salt concentration/molarity. If one adds 1 litre of water to this solution the salt concentration is reduced. The diluted solution still contains 10 grams of salt/. Mathematically this relationship can be shown in the equation: Where:

— Freebase

Corner solution

Corner solution

A corner solution is a special solution to an agent's maximization problem in which the quantity of one of the arguments in the maximized function is zero. The more usual solution will lie in the non-zero interior at the point of tangency between the objective function and the constraint. For example, in consumer theory the objective function is the indifference-curve map of the consumer. The budget line is the constraint. In the usual case, constrained utility is maximized on the budget constraint with strictly positive quantities consumed of both goods. For a corner solution, however, utility is maximized at a point on one axis where the budget constraint intersects the highest attainable indifference curve at zero consumption for one good with all income used for the other good. Furthermore, a range of lower prices for the good with initial zero consumption may leave quantity demanded unchanged at zero, rather than increasing it as in the more usual case. In non-jargon English for the non-specialist, a corner solution is when the chooser is either unwilling or unable to make a tradeoff. In economics when someone says "I wouldn't buy that at any price" or "I will do X no matter the cost," those are corner solutions. Another example is "zero-tolerance" policies, or parents who are unwilling to expose their children to any risk, no matter how small and no matter what the benefits of the activity might be. "Nothing is more important than my child's safety" is a corner solution in its refusal to admit there might be tradeoffs. The term "corner solution" is sometimes used by economists in a more colloquial fashion to refer to these sorts of situations. The word "corner" refers to the fact that if one graphs the maximization problem, the optimal point will occur at the "corner" created by the budget constraint and one axis.

— Freebase

Zinc hydroxide

Zinc hydroxide

Zinc hydroxide Zn(OH)₂ is an inorganic chemical compound. It also occurs naturally as 3 rare minerals: wülfingite, ashoverite and sweetite. Like the hydroxides of other metals, such as lead, aluminium, beryllium, tin and chromium, zinc hydroxide, is amphoteric. Thus it will dissolve readily in a dilute solution of a strong acid, such as HCl, and also in a solution of an alkali such as sodium hydroxide. It can be prepared by adding sodium hydroxide solution, but not in excess, to a solution of any zinc salt. A white precipitate will be seen: Zn²⁺ + 2 OH− → Zn(OH)₂. If excess sodium hydroxide is added, the precipitate of zinc hydroxide will dissolve, forming a colorless solution of zincate ion: Zn(OH)₂ + 2 OH− → Zn(OH)₄²⁻. This property can be used as a test for zinc ions in solution, but it is not exclusive, since aluminum and lead compounds behave in a very similar manner. Unlike the hydroxides of aluminum and lead, zinc hydroxide also dissolves in excess aqueous ammonia to form a colorless, water-soluble ammine complex Zinc hydroxide will dissolve because the ion is normally surrounded by water ligands; when excess sodium hydroxide is added to the solution the hydroxide ions will reduce the complex to a −2 charge and make it soluble. When excess ammonia is added, it sets up an equilibrium which provides hydroxide ions; the formation of hydroxide ions causes a similar reaction as sodium hydroxide and creates a +2 charged complex with a co-ordination number of 4 with the ammonia ligands - this makes the complex soluble so that it dissolves.

— Freebase

Juvare

Juvare

Juvare is a worldwide leader in incident preparation and response technology. Juvare’s solution connects critical data into a common operating picture for situational awareness, uniting government agencies, healthcare facilities, private entities, and volunteer organizations to manage incidents faster and more efficiently, protecting people, property, and brands. Headquartered in Atlanta, GA, Juvare began operations in 2018. The company operates on a global scale working with emergency and incident response teams with public, private, government healthcare and healthcare organizations. In the beginning, Juvare built its expertise by working hand-in-hand within national Federal, State and Local government agencies. Juvare's solutions are used by multiple emergency and incident management organizations to efficiently and effectively coordinate planning, preparation, and response strategies to manage crisis and emergency events. Juvare is infused within multiple industries such as: Air & Travel, Transportation, Corporate Enterprise, Higher Education, Public & Private Healthcare, Energy, Power & Utilities, and Federal, State and Local Government Agencies. WebEOC, Juvare’s primary platform, is the most widely implemented and utilized Emergency Preparedness and Incident Management solution in the industry. An example where the solution was put in place to coordinate and prepare Emergency Management teams in Atlanta, Georgia was for the Big Game held on Feb. 3, 2019. There was over 1 million visitors across the globe that came to Atlanta to attend the event. Using Juvare’s solution, key personnel were able to plan for the event, monitor incidents and relay pertinent information in real-time to Emergency Medical Services (EMS), firefighters, hospital staff, state & local police, and federal government agencies for visibility into emergencies and crisis incidents as well as, helping the coordination of supplies, labor power to specific locations, and ambulances to local hospitals. Juvare's other solutions include CORES HAN (high-volume mass alert platform), CORES RMS (coordination and monitoring of volunteer personnel), eICS (Electronic Incident Command System), EMTrack (patient and population tracking solution) EMResource (management platform for healthcare and emergency resources) and Fleeteyes (tracking and accessing emergency management fleet vehicles).

— Wikipedia

Ideal solution

Ideal solution

In chemistry, an ideal solution or ideal mixture is a solution with thermodynamic properties analogous to those of a mixture of ideal gases. The enthalpy of mixing is zero as is the volume change on mixing by definition; the closer to zero the enthalpy of mixing is, the more "ideal" the behaviour of the solution becomes. The vapor pressure of the solution obeys Raoult's law, and the activity coefficient of each component (which measures deviation from ideality) is equal to one.The concept of an ideal solution is fundamental to chemical thermodynamics and its applications, such as the use of colligative properties.

— Wikipedia

Precipitate

Precipitate

an insoluble substance separated from a solution in a concrete state by the action of some reagent added to the solution, or of some force, such as heat or cold. The precipitate may fall to the bottom (whence the name), may be diffused through the solution, or may float at or near the surface

— Webster Dictionary

Syrup

Syrup

a thick and viscid saccharine solution of superior quality (as sugarhouse sirup or molasses, maple sirup); specifically, in pharmacy and often in cookery, a saturated solution of sugar and water (simple sirup), or such a solution flavored or medicated

— Webster Dictionary

Solubility

Solubility

Solubility is the property of a solid, liquid, or gaseous chemical substance called solute to dissolve in a solid, liquid, or gaseous solvent to form a homogeneous solution of the solute in the solvent. The solubility of a substance fundamentally depends on the physical and chemical properties of the used solute and solvent as well as on temperature, pressure and the pH of the solution. The extent of the solubility of a substance in a specific solvent is measured as the saturation concentration, where adding more solute does not increase the concentration of the solution and begin to precipitate the excess amount of solute. Most often, the solvent is a liquid, which can be a pure substance or a mixture. One may also speak of solid solution, but rarely of solution in a gas. The extent of solubility ranges widely, from infinitely soluble such as ethanol in water, to poorly soluble, such as silver chloride in water. The term insoluble is often applied to poorly or very poorly soluble compounds. Under certain conditions, the equilibrium solubility can be exceeded to give a so-called supersaturated solution, which is metastable.

— Freebase

Brix

Brix

Degrees Brix is the sugar content of an aqueous solution. One degree Brix is 1 gram of sucrose in 100 grams of solution and represents the strength of the solution as percentage by weight. If the solution contains dissolved solids other than pure sucrose, then the °Bx only approximates the dissolved solid content. The °Bx is traditionally used in the wine, sugar, fruit juice, and honey industries. Comparable scales for indicating sucrose content are the degree Plato, which is widely used by the brewing industry, and the degree Balling, which is the oldest of the three systems and therefore mostly found in older textbooks, but also still in use in some parts of the world. A sucrose solution with an apparent specific gravity of 1.040 would be 9.99325 °Bx or 9.99359 °P while the representative sugar body, the International Commission for Uniform Methods of Sugar Analysis, in favor of mass fraction, would report the solution strength as 9.99249%. Because the differences between the systems are of little practical significance and wide historical use of the Brix unit, modern instruments calculate mass fraction using ICUMSA official formulas but report the result as °Bx.

— Freebase

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An antonym for "prosperous"
  • A. flourishing
  • B. palmy
  • C. achromatic
  • D. comfortable