Synonyms containing moved(p)

We've found 2,774 synonyms:

Passion

Passion

pash′un, n. power of feeling pain or suffering: strong feeling or agitation of mind, esp. rage: ardent love: eager desire: state of the soul when receiving an impression: suffering or passive condition, as opposed to Action: the sufferings, esp. the death, of Christ: (pl.) excited conditions of mind.—ns. Passiflō′ra, a genus of climbing herbs or shrubs, the passion-flowers; Pass′ional, Pass′ionary, a book containing accounts of the sufferings of saints and martyrs.—adjs. Pass′ional, influenced by passion; Pass′ionate, moved by passion: showing strong and warm feeling: easily moved to anger: intense.—adv. Pass′ionately.—n. Pass′ionateness.—adj. Pass′ioned, moved by passion: expressing passion.—ns. Pass′ion-flow′er, a flower so called from a fancied resemblance to a crown of thorns, the emblem of Christ's passion; Pass′ionist (R.C.), one of a religious congregation devoted to the commemoration of the Passion of Christ by missions, &c.—adj. Pass′ionless, free from passion: not easily excited to anger.—n. Pass′ion-mū′sic, music to which words describing the sufferings and death of Christ are set.—adj. Pass′ion-pale (Tenn.), pale with passion.—ns. Pass′ion-play, a religious drama representing the sufferings and death of Christ; Pass′ion-Sun′day, the fifth Sunday in Lent; Pass′ion-week, name commonly given in England to Holy-week (as being the week of Christ's passion); but, according to proper rubrical usage, the week preceding Holy-week. [Fr.,—L. passio, passionispassus, pa.p. of pati, to suffer.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Steam

Steam

stēm, n. the vapour of water—when dry, invisible and transparent like air, and not to be confused with the semi-liquid cloud which comes from the chimney of a locomotive; when superheated, changing the characteristics of a vapour for those belonging to what is known as a 'perfect gas:' the mist formed by condensed vapour: any vaporous exhalation: energy, force, spirit.—v.i. to rise or pass off in steam or vapour: to move by steam.—v.t. to expose to steam.—ns. Steam′boat, Steam′ship, Steam′-vess′el, a boat, ship, or vessel propelled by steam; Steam′-boil′er, a boiler for generating steam; Steam′-carriage, a carriage moved by steam on common roads; Steam′-chest, -dome, a chamber above a steam-boiler serving as a reservoir for steam; Steam′-crane, a crane worked by a steam-engine; Steam′-dig′ger, a machine for digging the soil by means of steam-power, the soil being thereby much more thoroughly pulverised than by ploughing; Steam′-en′gine, an engine or machine which changes heat into useful work through the medium of steam; Steam′er, a vessel moved by steam: a road-locomotive, &c.: a vessel in which articles are steamed; Steam′-gauge, an instrument for measuring the pressure of steam in a boiler; Steam′-gov′ernor, the governor of a steam-engine; Steam′-gun, a gun projecting a missile by means of steam; Steam′-hamm′er, a hammer consisting of a steam cylinder and piston placed vertically over an anvil, the hammer moved by the action of the steam; Steam′iness, the quality of being vaporous or misty; Steam′-jack′et, a hollow casing surrounding any vessel and into which steam may be admitted; Steam′-launch (see Launch); Steam′-navigā′tion, the propulsion of vessels by steam; Steam′-nav′vy, an excavator operated by steam in the making of docks, canals, &c.; Steam′-pack′et, a steam-vessel plying between certain ports; Steam′-pipe, a pipe for conveying steam; Steam′-plough, a plough or gang of ploughs worked by a steam-engine; Steam′-pow′er, the force of steam when applied to machinery; Steam′-press, a printing-press worked by steam; Steam′-print′ing, printing in which the presses are operated by steam; Steam′-trap, a contrivance for allowing the passage of water while preventing the passage of steam; Steam′-tug, a small steam-vessel used in towing ships; Steam′-whis′tle, an apparatus attached to a steam-engine through which steam is discharged, producing a sound in the manner of a common whistle.—adj. Steam′y, consisting of, or like, steam: full of steam or vapour.—n. Steam′-yacht, a yacht propelled by steam. [A.S. steám; cog. with Dut. stoom.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Passionate

Passionate

capable or susceptible of passion, or of different passions; easily moved, excited or agitated; specifically, easily moved to anger; irascible; quick-tempered; as, a passionate nature

— Webster Dictionary

Vane

Vane

any flat, extended surface attached to an axis and moved by the wind; as, the vane of a windmill; hence, a similar fixture of any form moved in or by water, air, or other fluid; as, the vane of a screw propeller, a fan blower, an anemometer, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Epicycle

Epicycle

an expression used in the Ptolemaic (q. v.) system of astronomy; the old belief that the celestial bodies moved in perfect circles round the earth was found to be inadequate to explain the varying position of the planets, a difficulty which led Ptolemy to invent his theory of epicycles, which was to the effect that each planet revolved round a centre of its own, greater or less, but that all these centres themselves moved in procession round the earth, a theory which fell to pieces before the investigations of Kepler and Newton.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Tiller

Tiller

A tiller or till is a lever attached to a rudder post or rudder stock of a boat that provides leverage in the form of torque for the helmsman to turn the rudder. The tiller can be used by the helmsman directly pulling or pushing it, but it may also be moved remotely using tiller lines or a ship's wheel. Rapid or excessive movement of the tiller results in an increase in drag and will result in braking or slowing the boat. In steering a boat, the tiller is always moved in the direction opposite of which the bow of the boat is to move. If the tiller is moved to port side, the bow will turn to starboard. If the tiller is moved to starboard, the bow will turn port. Sailing students often learn the alliterative phrase "Tiller Towards Trouble" to remind them of how to steer.

— Freebase

Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson

Willie Hugh Nelson is an American country music singer-songwriter, as well as an author, poet, actor, and activist. The critical success of the album Shotgun Willie, combined with the critical and commercial success of Red Headed Stranger and Stardust, made Nelson one of the most recognized artists in country music. He was one of the main figures of outlaw country, a subgenre of country music that developed in the late 1960s as a reaction to the conservative restrictions of the Nashville sound. Nelson has acted in over 30 films, co-authored several books, and has been involved in activism for the use of biofuels and the legalization of marijuana. Born during the Great Depression, and raised by his grandparents, Nelson wrote his first song at age seven and joined his first band at ten. During high school, he toured locally with the Bohemian Polka as their lead singer and guitar player. After graduating from high school, in 1950, he joined the Air Force but was later discharged due to back problems. After his return, Nelson attended Baylor University for two years but dropped out because he was succeeding in music. During this time, he worked as a disc jockey in Texas radio stations and a singer in honky tonks. Nelson moved to Vancouver, Washington, where he wrote "Family Bible" and recorded the song "Lumberjack" in 1956. In 1958, he moved to Houston, Texas after signing a contract with D Records. He sang at the Esquire Ballroom weekly and he worked as a disk jockey. During that time, he wrote songs that would become country standards, including "Funny How Time Slips Away", "Hello Walls", "Pretty Paper", and "Crazy". In 1960 he moved to Nashville, Tennessee, and later signed a publishing contract with Pamper Music which allowed him to join Ray Price's band as a bassist. In 1962, he recorded his first album, ...And Then I Wrote. Due to this success, Nelson signed in 1964 with RCA Victor and joined the Grand Ole Opry the following year. After mid-chart hits in the late 1960s and the early 1970s, Nelson retired in 1972 and moved to Austin, Texas. The rise of the popularity of hippie music in Austin motivated Nelson to return from retirement, performing frequently at the Armadillo World Headquarters.

— Freebase

County hall

County hall

A county hall or shire hall is usual name given to a building housing a county's administration. The location of the county hall has usually denoted the county town, and as county halls have moved it has also been considered that the county town has moved, for example when Derbyshire County Council moved from Derby to Matlock in the 1950s. As important government buildings, many county halls are known for their distinctive architecture. Some county halls are historic buildings at the heart of the town, whilst others are more modern office building in suburban locations. Many buildings which have lost their administrative function have retained the name county hall for historic reasons, such as County Hall, London. County Halls usually contain a council chamber, committee rooms and offices. Many have also been home to court rooms, however in recent years many have moved to separate buildings. County Halls in Great Britain and Ireland include: County Hall, Abingdon County Hall, Aylesbury County Hall, Cardiff County Hall, Coventry County Hall, Hertford County Hall, London County Hall, Wakefield County Hall County Hall, Swansea Shire Hall, Monmouth Shire Hall, Newport

— Freebase

Movable

Movable

mōōv′a-bl, adj. that may be moved, lifted, changed, &c.: not fixed: changing from one time to another.—n. an article of furniture.—ns. Movabil′ity, Mov′ableness.—n.pl. Mo′vables (law), such articles of property as may be moved, as furniture, &c., in opposition to lands and houses.—adv. Mov′ably.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Row

Row

rō, v.t. to impel with an oar: to transport by rowing.—v.i. to work with the oar: to be moved by oars.—n. an excursion in a rowing-boat.—adj. Row′able.—ns. Row′boat, a boat moved by rowers; Row′er; Row′-port, a small square hole in small vessels near the water-line for the oars in a calm. [A.S. rówan; Ger. rudern, Ice. róa.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Unwieldy

Unwieldy

un-wēl′di, adj. not easily moved or handled.—adv. Unwiel′dily.—n. Unwiel′diness, the state or quality of being unwieldy: difficulty of being moved.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Clickpass

Clickpass

Clickpass makes OpenID easy to use and brings OpenID closer to the mainstream than any other company has done before. The service wraps up the complexities of OpenID such that users are presented with consistent interfaces across all of the applications they use and can access them quickly and easily without needing a password. The company was founded in the UK but moved to Boston to take part in the summer 2007 Y-Combinator programme after which the founders moved on to San Francisco. The service went live on the 12th March 2008.

— CrunchBase

Facebook

Facebook

Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users.Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 weeks, half of the schools in the Boston area began demanding a Facebook network. Zuckerberg immediately recruited his friends Dustin Moskovitz, Chris Hughes, and Eduardo Saverin to help build Facebook, and within four months, Facebook added 30 more college networks. The original idea for the term Facebook came from Zuckerberg’s high school (Phillips Exeter Academy). The Exeter Face Book was passed around to every student as a way for students to get to know their classmates for the following year. It was a physical paper book until Zuckerberg brought it to the internet.With this success, Zuckerberg, Moskowitz and Hughes moved out to Palo Alto for the summer and rented a sublet. A few weeks later, Zuckerberg ran into the former cofounder of Napster, Sean Parker. Parker soon moved in to Zuckerberg’s apartment and they began working together. Parker provided the introduction to their first investor, Peter Thiel, cofounder of PayPal and managing partner of The Founders Fund. Thiel invested $500,000 into Facebook. With millions more users, Friendster attempted to acquire the company for $10 million in mid 2004. Facebook turned down the offer and subsequently received $12.7 million in funding from Accel Partners, at a valuation of around $100 million. Facebook continued to grow, opening up to high school students in September 2005 and adding an immensely popular photo sharing feature the next month. The next spring, Facebook received $25 million in funding from Greylock Partners and Meritech Capital, as well as previous investors Accel Partners and Peter Thiel. The pre-money valuation for this deal was about $525 million. Facebook subsequently opened up to work networks, eventually amassing over 20,000 work networks. Finally in September 2006, Facebook opened to anyone with an email address. In the summer of 2006, Yahoo attempted to acquir

— CrunchBase

Kingdome

Kingdome

The Kingdome (officially King County Multipurpose Domed Stadium) was a multi-purpose stadium in Seattle's SoDo neighborhood. Owned and operated by King County, the Kingdome opened in 1976 and was best known as the home stadium of the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League (NFL), the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball (MLB), and the Seattle SuperSonics of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The stadium also served as both the home outdoor and indoor venue for the Seattle Sounders of the North American Soccer League (NASL) and hosted numerous amateur sporting events, concerts, and other events. The Kingdome measured 660 feet wide from its inside walls.The idea of constructing a covered stadium for a major league football and/or baseball team was first proposed to Seattle officials in 1959. Voters rejected separate measures to approve public funding for such a stadium in 1960 and 1966, but the outcome was different in 1968; King County voters approved the issue of US$40 million in municipal bonds to construct the stadium. Construction began in 1972 and the stadium opened in 1976 as the home stadium of the Sounders and Seahawks. The Mariners moved in the following year, and the SuperSonics moved in the next year, only to move back to the Seattle Center Coliseum in 1985. The stadium hosted several major sports events, including the Soccer Bowl in August 1976, the Pro Bowl in January 1977, the Major League Baseball All-Star Game in July 1979, the NBA All-Star Game in 1987, and the NCAA Final Four in 1984, 1989, and 1995. During the 1990s, the Seahawks' and Mariners' respective ownership groups began to question the suitability of the Kingdome as a venue for each team, threatening to relocate unless new, publicly funded stadiums were built. At issue was the fact that neither team saw their shared tenancy as profitable, as well as the integrity of the stadium's roof as highlighted by the collapse of ceiling tiles onto the seating area before a scheduled Mariners game. As a result, public funding packages for new, purpose-built stadiums for the Mariners and Seahawks were approved in 1995 and 1997, respectively. The Mariners moved to Safeco Field midway through the 1999 season, and the Seahawks temporarily moved to Husky Stadium after the 1999 season. The Kingdome was demolished by implosion on March 26, 2000; the Seahawks' new stadium, Seahawks Stadium (now known as CenturyLink Field) was built on the site and opened in 2002. King County paid off the bonds used to build and repair the Kingdome in 2015, 15 years after its demolition.

— Wikipedia

Pursuit, Smooth

Pursuit, Smooth

Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

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