Synonyms containing not a little

We've found 69,611 synonyms:

Little

Little

small in size or extent; not big; diminutive; -- opposed to big or large; as, a little body; a little animal; a little piece of ground; a little hill; a little distance; a little child

— Webster Dictionary

Little Rock, Arkansas

Little Rock, Arkansas

Little Rock is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Arkansas. As the county seat of Pulaski County, the city was incorporated on November 7, 1831, on the south bank of the Arkansas River close to the state's geographic center. The city derived its name from a rock formation along the river, named the "Little Rock" (French: La Petite Roche) by the French explorer Jean-Baptiste Bénard de la Harpe in the 1720s. The capital of the Arkansas Territory was moved to Little Rock from Arkansas Post in 1821. The city's population was 197,312 in 2019 according to the United States Census Bureau. The six-county Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, AR Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is ranked 78th in terms of population in the United States with 738,344 residents according to the 2017 estimate by the United States Census Bureau.Little Rock is a cultural, economic, government, and transportation center within Arkansas and the South. Several cultural institutions are in Little Rock, such as the Arkansas Arts Center, the Arkansas Repertory Theatre, and the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, in addition to hiking, boating, and other outdoor recreational opportunities. Little Rock's history is available through history museums, historic districts or neighborhoods like the Quapaw Quarter, and historic sites such as Little Rock Central High School. The city is the headquarters of Dillard's, Windstream Communications, Acxiom, Stephens Inc., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Heifer International, Winrock International, the Clinton Foundation, and the Rose Law Firm. Other corporations, such as Amazon, Dassault Falcon Jet, LM Wind Power, Simmons Bank, Euronet Worldwide, AT&T, and Entergy have large operations in the city. State government is a large employer, with many offices downtown. Two major Interstate highways, Interstate 30 and Interstate 40, meet in Little Rock, with the Port of Little Rock serving as a shipping hub.

— Wikipedia

Little League Baseball

Little League Baseball

Little League Baseball and Softball is a non-profit organization in South Williamsport, Pennsylvania, United States which organizes local youth baseball and softball leagues throughout the U.S. and the rest of the world. Founded by Carl Stotz in 1939 as a three-team league in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, Little League Baseball encourages local volunteers to organize and operate Little League programs that are annually chartered through Little League International. Each league can structure itself to best serve the children in the area in which the league operates. Several specific divisions of Little League baseball and softball are available to children ages 4 to 18. The organization holds a congressional charter under Title 36 of the United States Code. The organization's administrative office is located in South Williamsport. The first Little League Baseball World Series was played in Williamsport in 1947. The Little League International Complex hosts the annual Little League Baseball World Series at Howard J. Lamade Stadium and Little League Volunteer Stadium, and is also the site of the Peter J. McGovern Little League Museum, which provides a history of Little League Baseball and Softball through interactive exhibits for children.

— Freebase

Little Women

Little Women

Little Women is a novel by American author Louisa May Alcott. The book was written and set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House, in Concord, Massachusetts. It was published in two volumes in 1868 and 1869. The novel follows the lives of four sisters – Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March – and is loosely based on the author's childhood experiences with her three sisters. The first volume, Little Women, was an immediate commercial and critical success, prompting the composition of the book's second volume, entitled Good Wives, which was also successful. Both books were first published as a single volume entitled Little Women in 1880. Alcott followed Little Women with two sequels, also featuring the March sisters: Little Men and Jo's Boys. Little Women was a fiction novel for girls that veered from the normal writings for children, especially girls, at the time. Little Women has three major themes:” domesticity, work, and true love. All of them are interdependent and each is necessary to the achievement of a heroine’s individual identity.” Little Women itself “has been read as a romance or as a quest, or both. It has been read as a family drama that validates virtue over wealth.” Little Women has been read “as a means of escaping that life by women who knew its gender constraints only too well.” Alcott “combines many conventions of the sentimental novel with crucial ingredients of Romantic children’s fiction, creating a new form of which Little Women is a unique model.” Elbert argued that within Little Women can be found the first vision of the “American Girl” and that her multiple aspects are embodied in the differing March sisters.

— Freebase

Small

Small

smawl, adj. little in quantity or degree: minute: not great: unimportant: ungenerous, petty: of little worth or ability: short: having little strength: gentle: little in quality or quantity.—adv. in a low tone; gently.—ns. Small′-ale, ale with little malt and unhopped; Small′-and-earl′y (coll.) an informal evening-party.—n.pl. Small′-arms, muskets, rifles, pistols, &c., including all weapons that can be actually carried by a man.—n. Small′-beer, a kind of weak beer.—adj. inferior generally.—n.pl. Small′-clothes, knee-breeches, esp. those of the close-fitting 18th-century form.—ns. Small′-coal, coal not in lumps but small pieces; Small′-craft, small vessels generally.—n.pl. Small′-debts, a phrase current in Scotland to denote debts under £12, recoverable in the Sheriff Court.—n. Small′-hand, writing such as is ordinarily used in correspondence.—n.pl. Small′-hours, the hours immediately following midnight.—adj. Small′ish, somewhat small.—ns. Small′ness; Small′-pī′ca (see Pica); Small′pox, or Variola, a contagious, febrile disease, of the class known as Exanthemata, characterised by small pocks or eruptions on the skin; Smalls, the 'little-go' or previous examination: small-clothes; Small′-talk, light or trifling conversation.—n.pl. Small′-wares (see Ware).—In a small way, with little capital or stock: unostentatiously. [A.S. smæl; Ger. schmal.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Barot

Barot

in manila,Philippine .. barot The national costume of the Philippines, the baro't saya, is an elegant hybrid of Filipino and Spanish clothing styles. The term itself comes from the Tagalong words "barot at saya" or "blouse and skirt," still the basic components of the ensemble. representation of dignity of a women of origin came from what should be inside & out... carrying the respect should be given to them in past of time that have been forgotten... but in my opinion it was a dress not to what to be should given on whose dressing or carring out the dress it it a way of representation a man shoul be give to a woman to be seen by many to return the favor to his man & representation of family & country.. a old lady that become whose become truly of magnificent of her time not just wearing it but by responsible of what should what we are is "TANDANG SORA" "GABRIELA SILANG" even it have been century have past that meaning of courage of even time of need of help & compassion with enough of saying its enough its was a truly past only know who truly who sacrifice without expecting in return without doubt of doing of what it make them proud only mind & heart would tell... if that 2 legend woman not been remember of what sacrifice they have done just to have what have now.. it only means we are truly not worth to be one not having a even a little of appreciation to those who help doing a big part of not what we can give,never think of who ever me.you...we.... should be we are not on our own self but to help one another to appreciate them the time spend to us..in becoming a true of representation of a pilipino is a courage not to fight back but to speak to do the wrong even it a sin in a honest of let it accept of fault just to push up my country men that there also deserve the same treatment help there need ... in pushing to far for it to surpass of my self encourage them how good people they are that in my small ways of many fault mistakes & sin i done & made ...on let it known by many it was them all along who representing what we become of leaving them behind...if what my most love one i have become what she have now what she felted even its small or big thing it may... it was from those people i should be back to know this are people who need most many of you have to help them not me... who also em i if not bcoz of help i get to them. i just beg my god don't give pity on me... give many thing

— Editors Contribution

North Little Rock

North Little Rock

North Little Rock is a city in Pulaski County, Arkansas, United States, across the Arkansas River from Little Rock in the central part of the state. The population was 62,304 at the 2010 census. North Little Rock, along with Little Rock and Conway, anchors the six-county Little Rock–North Little Rock–Conway Metropolitan Statistical Area., which is further included in the Little Rock–North Little Rock–Pine Bluff Combined Statistical Area with 893,610 residents. The city includes Dickey-Stephens Park, the new home of the Arkansas Travelers minor league baseball team. Burns Park, one of the largest municipal parks in the United States, is located in western North Little Rock.

— Freebase

Little America

Little America

Little America was a series of Antarctic exploration bases, located on the Ross Ice Shelf, south of the Bay of Whales. The first base in the series was established in January 1929 by Richard Byrd, and was abandoned in 1930. This was where the film With Byrd at the South Pole was filmed, about Byrd's trip to the South Pole. Little America II was established in 1934, some 30 feet above the site of the original base, with some of the original base accessed via tunnel. This base was briefly set adrift in 1934, but the iceberg fused to the main glacier. Little America III was established 6 miles to the north, for the 1940–1941 season, and Little America IV was established in 1946–1947. Little America V was established at Kainan Bay, some 30 miles to the east on January 3, 1956, as part of Operation Deep Freeze. Little America V served as the American base in the South Polar program in the International Geophysical Year. Little America V was constructed by US Navy Seabees in the three month window before the Antarctic winter makes construction next to impossible. All of Little American V was constructed below the snow line in the ice, with individual living quarters, generator room, cafeteria, and with ramps leading out at one end for tracked vehicles. This type of construction meant that none of those staying in Little America V had to go out of door in the harsh winter when going from one section to another or the Antarctic town.

— Freebase

According to all known laws of aviation, there is no way a bee should be able to fly. Its wi

According to all known laws of aviation, there is no way a bee should be able to fly. Its wi

According to all known laws of aviation, there is no way a bee should be able to fly. Its wings are too small to get its fat little body off the ground. The bee, of course, flies anyway because bees don't care what humans think is impossible. Yellow, black. Yellow, black. Yellow, black. Yellow, black. Ooh, black and yellow! Let's shake it up a little. Barry! Breakfast is ready! Ooming! Hang on a second. Hello? - Barry? - Adam? - Oan you believe this is happening? - I can't. I'll pick you up. Looking sharp. Use the stairs. Your father paid good money for those. Sorry. I'm excited. Here's the graduate. We're very proud of you, son. A perfect report card, all B's. Very proud. Ma! I got a thing going here. - You got lint on your fuzz. - Ow! That's me! - Wave to us! We'll be in row 118,000. - Bye! Barry, I told you, stop flying in the house! - Hey, Adam. - Hey, Barry. - Is that fuzz gel? - A little. Special day, graduation. Never thought I'd make it. Three days grade school, three days high school. Those were awkward. Three days college. I'm glad I took a day and hitchhiked around the hive. You did come back different. - Hi, Barry. - Artie, growing a mustache? Looks good. - Hear about Frankie? - Yeah. - You going to the funeral? - No, I'm not going. Everybody knows, sting someone, you die. Don't waste it on a squirrel. Such a hothead. I guess he could have just gotten out of the way. I love this incorporating an amusement park into our day. That's why we don't need vacations. Boy, quite a bit of pomp... under the circumstances. - Well, Adam, today we are men. - We are! - Bee-men. - Amen! Hallelujah! Students, faculty, distinguished bees, please welcome Dean Buzzwell. Welcome, New Hive Oity graduating class of... ...9:15. That concludes our ceremonies. And begins your career at Honex Industries! Will we pick ourjob today? I heard it's just orientation. Heads up! Here we go. Keep your hands and antennas inside the tram at all times. - Wonder what it'll be like? - A little scary. Welcome to Honex, a division of Honesco and a part of the Hexagon Group. This is it! Wow. Wow. We know that you, as a bee, have worked your whole life to get to the point where you can work for your whole life. Honey begins when our valiant Pollen Jocks

— Editors Contribution

Non

Non

non, adv. not, a Latin word used as a prefix, as in ns. Non-abil′ity, want of ability; Non-accept′ance, want of acceptance: refusal to accept; Non-ac′cess (law), absence of opportunity for marital commerce; Non-acquaint′ance, want of acquaintance; Non-acquiesc′ence, refusal of acquiescence; Non-admiss′ion, refusal of admission: failure to be admitted; Non-alienā′tion, state of not being alienated: failure to alienate; Non-appear′ance, failure or neglect to appear, esp. in a court of law; Non-arrī′val, failure to arrive; Non-attend′ance, a failure to attend: absence; Non-atten′tion, inattention; Non′-claim, a failure to make claim within the time limited by law; Non-com′batant, any one connected with an army who is there for some other purpose than that of fighting, as a surgeon, &c.: a civilian in time of war.—adjs. Non-commiss′ioned, not having a commission, as an officer in the army below the rank of commissioned officer—abbrev. Non-com′.; Non-commit′tal, unwilling to commit one's self to any particular opinion or course of conduct, free from any declared preference or pledge.—ns. Non-commū′nicant, one who abstains from joining in holy communion, or who has not yet communicated; Non-commūn′ion; Non-complī′ance, neglect or failure of compliance.—adj. Non-comply′ing.—n. Non-concur′rence, refusal to concur.—adj. Non-conduct′ing, not conducting or transmitting: not allowing a fluid or a force to pass along, as glass does not conduct electricity.—n. Non-conduct′or, a substance which does not conduct or transmit certain properties or conditions, as heat or electricity.—adj. Nonconform′ing, not conforming, esp. to an established church.—n. and adj. Nonconform′ist, one who does not conform: esp. one who refused to conform or subscribe to the Act of Uniformity in 1662—abbrev. Non-con′.—n. Nonconform′ity, want of conformity, esp. to the established church.—adj. Non-contā′gious, not infectious.—ns. Non′-content, one not content: in House of Lords, one giving a negative vote; Non-deliv′ery, failure or neglect to deliver.—adj. Non-effect′ive, not efficient or serviceable: unfitted for service.—n. a member of a force who is not able, for some reason, to take part in active service.—adj. Non-effic′ient, not up to the mark required for service.—n. a soldier who has not yet undergone the full number of drills.—n. Non-ē′go, in metaphysics, the not-I, the object as opposed to the subject, whatever is not the conscious self.—adjs.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Little Christmas

Little Christmas

Little Christmas is one of the traditional names in Ireland for January 6, more commonly known in the rest of the world as the Feast of the Epiphany. It is so called because under the older Julian calendar, Christmas Day celebrations fell on that day whereas under the Gregorian calendar it falls on December 25. It is the traditional end of the Christmas season and the last day of the Christmas holidays for both primary and secondary schools in Ireland. In the Scottish Highlands the term Little Christmas is applied to New Year's Day, also known as Là Challuinn, or Là na Bliadhna Ùire, while Epiphany is known as Là Féill nan Rìgh, the feast-day of the Kings. The Transalpine Redemptorists who live on Papa Stronsay celebrate 'Little Christmas' on the twenty-fifth day of every month, except for December, when the twenty-fifth day is of course celebrated as Christmas Day. In some parts of England, such as Lancashire, this day is also known as Little Christmas. In Norway and Sweden, Little Christmas Day refers to January 13, twenty days after Christmas, and is regarded as the day when ornaments must be removed from Christmas trees and any leftover food must be eaten. Somewhat confusingly Christmas Eve is also referred to as "Little Christmas" in Scandinavia. In the Isle of Man, New Year's Day on January 1 was formerly called Laa Nolick beg in Manx, or Little Christmas Day, while January 6 was referred to as Old Christmas Day. The name Little Christmas is also found other languages including Slovene, Galician, and Ukrainian.

— Freebase

Little Sioux River

Little Sioux River

The Little Sioux is a river in the United States. It rises in southwest Minnesota near the Iowa border, and continues to flow southwest for 258 miles across northwest Iowa into the Missouri River at Little Sioux. The Little Sioux River was known as Eaneah-waudepon or "Stone River" to the Sioux Indians. Its tributaries include the Ocheyedan River, Maple River and the West Fork of the Little Sioux River. The Little Sioux River is integral to the Nepper Watershed Project, a major Iowa flood control and soil conservation program that was introduced in 1947. The Little Sioux Valley was important in the Spirit Lake Massacre of 1857, when the Santee Sioux chief Inkpaduta made forays as far downstream as Smithland. The river valley also figures prominently in folklore about the nineteenth century outlaw, Jesse James, who reportedly used the secluded valley, with its wooded ravines, as a hideout and a route north to Minnesota during the 1870s. Geologically, the Little Sioux rises in a region of glacial potholes near the "Iowa Great Lakes". It then traverses a rich agricultural region on its way to the Loess Hills, from which it then flows out onto the floodplain of the Missouri River. Through much of its middle course the Little Sioux is a relatively wild meandered stream, with excellent canoeing, camping, and fishing opportunities. However, from Smithland downstream to its mouth, the river has been channelized and environmentally degraded.

— Freebase

Little Rock

Little Rock

Little Rock is the capital and the largest city of the U.S. state of Arkansas. The Metropolitan Statistical Area had a population of 717,666 people in the 2012 census estimate. The MSA is included in the Little Rock−North Little Rock, AR Combined Statistical Area, which had a population of 893,610 in the 2012 census estimate. As of the 2010 US Census, Little Rock had a city proper population of 193,524. It is the county seat of Pulaski County. Located near the geographic center of Arkansas, Little Rock derives its name from a small rock formation on the south bank of the Arkansas River called la Petite Roche. The "little rock" was used by early river traffic as a landmark and became a well-known river crossing. The "little rock" is across the river from "big rock," a large bluff at the edge of the river, which was once used as a rock quarry. There have been two ships of the United States Navy named after the city, including USS Little Rock.

— Freebase

Little Theatre

Little Theatre

The Little Theatre in Rochester, New York, commonly known as "The Little" is a movie theatre located on historic East Avenue in downtown Rochester, New York and a modest non-profit multiplex specializing in art film, including independent and foreign productions outside the United States. Founded in 1928, The Little is one of the oldest active movie theaters built specifically to show films in the US, serving as an alternative venue for cinema of higher artistic caliber than what was popular at the time. To remain in business, The Little has created a unique theater experience for its patrons strikingly different from that of standard commercial cinemas. The Little typically shows films that never make it to the large theater chains, either due to lack of publicity, popularity, exposure, or content that is too risky and/or inappropriate for larger audiences. Foreign films, independent films, some documentary films and art films are its common fare. The Little is unique in the area in treating anime films as artistic cinema, and titles by the likes of Hayao Miyazaki always find their way to The Little's screens. Critics at The Little provide a synopsis of any film they intend to show, both on their website and posted around their ticket booths on the street.

— Freebase

Little

Little

lit′l, adj. (comp. Less; superl. Least) small in quantity or extent: weak, poor: brief.—n. that which is small in quantity or extent: a small space.—adv. in a small quantity or degree: not much.—ns. Litt′le-ease, discomfort, misery: a form of punishment, as the stocks; Litt′le-end′ian, one of the Lilliputian party who opposed the Big-endians, maintaining that boiled eggs should be cracked at the little end; Litt′le-go (see Go); Litt′leness; Litt′le-off′ice, a short service of psalms, hymns, collects, &c.—adj. Litt′leworth, worthless.—By little and little, by degrees; In little, on a small scale; Not a little, considerably. [A.S. lýtel.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
An antonym of "besotted"
  • A. stringent
  • B. affluent
  • C. sober
  • D. flush