Synonyms containing not pertaining to the matter in hand

We've found 162,093 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hand

Hand

hand, n. the extremity of the arm below the wrist: that which does the duty of a hand by pointing, as the hand of a clock: the fore-foot of a horse: a measure of four inches: an agent or workman: (pl.) work-people in a factory: performance, agency, co-operation: power or manner of performing: skill: possession: style of handwriting, sign-manual: side: direction: the set of cards held by a single player at whist, &c.: a single round at a game.—v.t. to give with the hand: to lead or conduct: (naut.) to furl, as sails.—ns. Hand′-bag, a bag for small articles, carried in the hand; Hand′-ball, the sport of throwing and catching a ball; Hand′-barr′ow, a barrow without a wheel, carried by men: Hand′-bas′ket, a small portable basket; Hand′-bell, a small bell held by the hand when rung, a table-bell; Hand′bill, a pruning-hook used in the hand: a bill or loose sheet with some announcement; Hand′book, a manual or book of reference: a guide-book for travellers; Hand′breadth, the breadth of a hand: a palm; Hand′-cart, a small cart drawn by hand.—adj. Hand′ed (Milt.), with hands joined: (Shak.) having a hand of a certain sort.—ns. Hand′er; Hand′fast, a firm grip, handle: a contract, esp. a betrothal.—adj. bound, espoused: tight-fisted.—adj. Hand′fasted, betrothed.—n. Hand′fasting, betrothal: a private or even probationary form of marriage.—adj. Hand′-foot′ed, having feet like hands, chiropod.—ns. Hand′ful, as much as fills the hand: a small number or quantity:—pl. Hand′fuls; Hand′-gall′op, an easy gallop, in which the speed of the horse is restrained by the bridle-hand; Hand′-glass, a glass or small glazed frame used to protect plants: a small mirror; Hand′-grenade′, a grenade to be thrown by the hand; Hand′grip, grasp, grip, close struggle; Hand′icuffs, Hand′ycuffs, fighting hand to hand.—adj. Hand′less, awkward.—ns. Hand-line, a fishing-line worked by hand without a rod; Hand′-list, a list for easy reference; Hand′-loom, a weaver's loom worked by hand, as distinguished from a power-loom.—adj. Hand′-made, manufactured by hand, not by a machine.—ns. Hand′maid, Hand′maiden, a female servant; Hand′-mill, a mill worked by hand for coffee, pepper, &c., a quern; Hand′-or′gan, a portable organ, played by means of a crank turned by the hand; Hand′-pā′per, a particular make of paper, early in use at the Record Office, with the water-mark of a hand pointing; Hand′-post, a finger-post, guide; — Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Matter

Matter

In classical physics and general chemistry, matter is any substance that has mass and takes up space by having volume. All everyday objects that can be touched are ultimately composed of atoms, which are made up of interacting subatomic particles, and in everyday as well as scientific usage, "matter" generally includes atoms and anything made up of them, and any particles (or combination of particles) that act as if they have both rest mass and volume. However it does not include massless particles such as photons, or other energy phenomena or waves such as light or sound. Matter exists in various states (also known as phases). These include classical everyday phases such as solid, liquid, and gas – for example water exists as ice, liquid water, and gaseous steam – but other states are possible, including plasma, Bose–Einstein condensates, fermionic condensates, and quark–gluon plasma.Usually atoms can be imagined as a nucleus of protons and neutrons, and a surrounding "cloud" of orbiting electrons which "take up space". However this is only somewhat correct, because subatomic particles and their properties are governed by their quantum nature, which means they do not act as everyday objects appear to act – they can act like waves as well as particles and they do not have well-defined sizes or positions. In the Standard Model of particle physics, matter is not a fundamental concept because the elementary constituents of atoms are quantum entities which do not have an inherent "size" or "volume" in any everyday sense of the word. Due to the exclusion principle and other fundamental interactions, some "point particles" known as fermions (quarks, leptons), and many composites and atoms, are effectively forced to keep a distance from other particles under everyday conditions; this creates the property of matter which appears to us as matter taking up space. For much of the history of the natural sciences people have contemplated the exact nature of matter. The idea that matter was built of discrete building blocks, the so-called particulate theory of matter, independently appeared in ancient Greece and ancient India among Buddhists, Hindus and Jains in 1st-millennium BC. Ancient philosophers who proposed the particulate theory of matter include Kanada (c. 6th–century BC or after), Leucippus (~490 BC) and Democritus (~470–380 BC).

— Wikipedia

Hand surgery

Hand surgery

Hand surgery deals with both surgical and non-surgical treatment of conditions and problems that may take place in the hand or upper extremity (commonly from the tip of the hand to the shoulder) including injury and infection. Hand surgery may be practiced by graduates of general surgery, orthopedic surgery and plastic surgery. Chiroplasty, or cheiroplasty, is plastic surgery of the hands.Plastic surgeons and orthopedic surgeons receive significant training in hand surgery during their residency training, with some graduates going on to do an additional one-year hand fellowship. Board certified general, plastic, or orthopedics surgeons who have completed approved fellowship training in hand surgery and have met a number of other practice requirements are qualified to take the "Certificate of Added Qualifications in Surgery of the Hand" examination, formerly known as the CAQSH, it is now known as the SOTH." Regardless of their original field of training, once candidates have completed an approved fellowship in hand surgery, all hand surgeons have received training in treating all injuries both to the bones and soft tissues of the hand and upper extremity. Among those without additional hand training, Plastic surgeons have usually received training to handle traumatic hand and digit amputations that require a "replant" operation. Orthopedic surgeons are trained to reconstruct all aspects to salvage the appendage: tendons, muscle, bone. Orthopedic surgeons are trained to handle complex fractures of the hand and injuries to the carpal bones that alter the mechanics of the wrist.

— Wikipedia

Matter

Matter

Matter is a poorly-defined term in science. The term has often been used in reference to a substance that has rest mass. Matter is also used loosely as a general term for the substance that makes up all observable physical objects. All objects we see with the naked eye are composed of atoms. This atomic matter is in turn made up of interacting subatomic particles—usually a nucleus of protons and neutrons, and a cloud of orbiting electrons. Typically, science considers these composite particles matter because they have both rest mass and volume. By contrast, massless particles, such as photons, are not considered matter, because they have neither rest mass nor volume. However, not all particles with rest mass have a classical volume, since fundamental particles such as quarks and leptons are considered "point particles" with no effective size or volume. Nevertheless, quarks and leptons together make up "ordinary matter," and their interactions contribute to the effective volume of the composite particles that make up ordinary matter. Matter commonly exists in four states: solid, liquid and gas, and plasma. . However, advances in experimental techniques have revealed other previously theoretical phases, such as Bose–Einstein condensates and fermionic condensates. A focus on an elementary-particle view of matter also leads to new phases of matter, such as the quark–gluon plasma. For much of the history of the natural sciences people have contemplated the exact nature of matter. The idea that matter was built of discrete building blocks, the so-called particulate theory of matter, was first put forward by the Greek philosophers Leucippus and Democritus.²²

— Freebase

Cosmon

Cosmon

Cosmon or Cosmonium is a hypothetical form of matter where the Universe would have been in a dense form of matter as a particle named Cosmon. The idea was originally proposed by Georges Lemaître who suggested the idea of a 'primeval atom’ (L'Hypothèse de l'Atome Primitif) 1946. He illustrated the idea by imagining an object 30 times larger than the volume of the sun containing all the matter of the Universe. Its density would be around 10 15 g cm − 3 {\displaystyle 10^{15}{\text{g cm}}^{-3}} . In his view this exploded somewhere between 20–60 billion years ago.The idea of a primeval “super-atom” lived on and was developed forward by Maurice Goldhaber in 1956. In his proposal there would have been a point, which had been called a Universon, that would have collapsed into a Cosmon and an Anticosmon pair. Goldhaber was wondering about why is there any matter if equal amount of matter and antimatter was formed in the beginning of the big bang. One explanation for this is the asymmetry of matter meaning that there could have been slightly more matter than antimatter, for instance 1001 matter particles to every 1000 antimatter. In Goldhabers model cosmon and anticosmon would have flown apart and therefore explaining issue without asymmetry.In 1989 Hans Dehmelt attempted to modernize the idea of the primeval atom. In this hypothesis, Cosmonium would have been the heaviest form of matter at the beginning of the big bang.

— Wikipedia

Dark matter

Dark matter

In astronomy and cosmology, dark matter is a type of matter hypothesized to account for a large part of the total mass in the universe. Dark matter cannot be seen directly with telescopes; evidently it neither emits nor absorbs light or other electromagnetic radiation at any significant level. Instead, its existence and properties are inferred from its gravitational effects on visible matter, radiation, and the large-scale structure of the universe. According to the Planck mission team, and based on the standard model of cosmology, the total mass–energy of the universe contains 4.9% ordinary matter, 26.8% dark matter and 68.3% dark energy. Thus, dark matter is estimated to constitute 84.5% of the total matter in the universe and 26.8% of the total content of the universe. Dark matter came to the attention of astrophysicists due to discrepancies between the mass of large astronomical objects determined from their gravitational effects, and the mass calculated from the "luminous matter" they contain: stars, gas and dust. It was first postulated by Jan Oort in 1932 to account for the orbital velocities of stars in the Milky Way, and by Fritz Zwicky in 1933 to account for evidence of "missing mass" in the orbital velocities of galaxies in clusters. Subsequently, many other observations have indicated the presence of dark matter in the universe, including the rotational speeds of galaxies by Vera Rubin, in the 1960s–1970s, gravitational lensing of background objects by galaxy clusters such as the Bullet Cluster, the temperature distribution of hot gas in galaxies and clusters of galaxies, and more recently the pattern of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. According to consensus among cosmologists, dark matter is composed primarily of a not yet characterized type of subatomic particle. The search for this particle, by a variety of means, is one of the major efforts in particle physics today.

— Freebase

State of matter

State of matter

States of matter in physics are the distinct forms that different phases of matter take on. Four states of matter are observable in everyday life: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Many other states are known such as Bose–Einstein condensates and neutron-degenerate matter but these only occur in extreme situations such as ultra cold or ultra dense matter. Other states, such as quark-gluon plasmas, are believed to be possible but remain theoretical for now. For a complete list of all exotic states of matter, see the list of states of matter. Historically, the distinction is made based on qualitative differences in properties. Matter in the solid state maintains a fixed volume and shape, with component particles close together and fixed into place. Matter in the liquid state maintains a fixed volume, but has a variable shape that adapts to fit its container. Its particles are still close together but move freely. Matter in the gaseous state has both variable volume and shape, adapting both to fit its container. Its particles are neither close together nor fixed in place. Matter in the plasma state has variable volume and shape, but as well as neutral atoms, it contains a significant number of ions and electrons, both of which can move around freely. Plasma is the most common form of visible matter in the universe.

— Freebase

Material

Material

ma-tē′ri-al, adj. consisting of matter: corporeal, not spiritual: substantial: essential: important, esp. of legal importance: (phil.) pertaining to matter and not to form, relating to the object as it exists.—n., esp. in pl., that out of which anything is to be made.—n. Materialisā′tion.—v.t. Matē′rialīse, to render material: to reduce to or regard as matter: to occupy with material interests.—ns. Matē′rialism, the doctrine that denies the independent existence of spirit, and maintains that there is but one substance—viz. matter—thus professing to find in matter (monistic or philosophical materialism), or in material entities (atomistic materialism), or in material qualities and forces (scientific or physical materialism), a complete explanation of all life and existence whatsoever; Matē′rialist, one who holds the doctrine of materialism: one absorbed in material interests, who takes a low view of life and its responsibilities.—adjs. Materialist′ic, -al, pertaining to materialism.—adv. Matē′rially.—ns. Matē′rialness, Material′ity.—Material being, existence in the form of matter; Material cause, that which gives being to the thing; Material distinction, a distinction between individuals of the same species; Material evidence, evidence tending to prove or to disprove the matter under judgment; Material fallacy, a fallacy in the matter or thought, rather than in the logical form; Material form, a form depending on matter; Material issue (see Issue).—Raw material, stuff as yet unworked into anything useful. [Fr.,—L. materialismateria.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter (BLM) is an organized movement in the United States advocating for non-violent civil disobedience in protest against incidents of police brutality against African-American people. An organization known simply as Black Lives Matter exists as a decentralized network with about 16 chapters in the United States and Canada, while a larger Black Lives Matter movement exists consisting of various separate like-minded organizations such as Dream Defenders and Assata's Daughters. The broader movement and its related organizations typically advocate against police violence towards black people, as well as for various other policy changes considered to be related to black liberation.In July 2013, the movement began with the use of the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter on social media after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of African-American teen Trayvon Martin in February 2012. The movement became nationally recognized for street demonstrations following the 2014 deaths of two African Americans: Michael Brown—resulting in protests and unrest in Ferguson, a city near St. Louis—and Eric Garner in New York City. Since the Ferguson protests, participants in the movement have demonstrated against the deaths of numerous other African Americans by police actions and/or while in police custody. In the summer of 2015, Black Lives Matter activists became involved in the 2016 United States presidential election. The originators of the hashtag and call to action, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi, expanded their project into a national network of over 30 local chapters between 2014 and 2016. The overall Black Lives Matter movement is a decentralized network of activists with no formal hierarchy.The movement returned to national headlines and gained further international attention during the global George Floyd protests in 2020 following Floyd's murder by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. An estimated 15 million to 26 million people participated (though not all are “members” of the organization) in the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in the United States, making Black Lives Matter one of the largest movements in U.S. history. The movement has advocated to defund the police and invest directly into black communities and alternative emergency response models.A June 2020 Pew Research Center poll found that the majority of Americans, across all racial and ethnic groups, have expressed support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

— Wikipedia

new matter

new matter

(in military courts). Should either party, in the course of their examination of witnesses, or by bringing forward new ones for that purpose, introduce new matter, the opposite one has the right of calling other witnesses to rebut such new matter. A prosecutor, however, cannot be allowed to bring forward evidence to rebut what has been elicited by his own cross-examination, but must be confined to new matter introduced by the accused, and supported by the examination-in-chief of the accused. The court should be very circumspect to see and prevent new matter from being introduced, either in the prosecution or defense. But the accused may urge in his defense mitigating circumstances, or examine witnesses as to character or service, and produce testimonials of such facts, without its being considered new matter; and if any point of law be raised, or any matter requiring explanation, the judge-advocate may explain; no other reply is admitted.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Cold dark matter

Cold dark matter

Cold dark matter is a hypothetical form of matter that interacts very weakly with electromagnetic radiation and most of whose particles move slowly compared to the speed of light. It is believed that approximately 80% of matter in the Universe is dark matter, with only a small fraction being the ordinary "baryonic" matter that composes stars and planets. As of 2006, most cosmologists favor the cold dark matter theory as a description of how the Universe went from a smooth initial state at early times to the lumpy distribution of galaxies and their clusters we see today — the large-scale structure of the Universe. The theory sees the role that dwarf galaxies played as crucial, as they are thought to be natural building blocks that form larger structures, created by small-scale density fluctuations in the early Universe. The theory was originally published in 1984 by United States physicists Joel R. Primack, George Blumenthal, and Sandra Moore Faber with UK scientist Martin Rees. In the cold dark matter theory, structure grows hierarchically, with small objects collapsing under their self-gravity first and merging in a continuous hierarchy to form more and more larger and more massive objects. In the hot dark matter paradigm, popular in the early 1980s, structure does not form hierarchically, but rather forms by fragmentation, with the largest superclusters forming first in flat pancake-like sheets and subsequently fragmenting into smaller pieces like our galaxy the Milky Way. The predictions of hot dark matter disagree with observations of large-scale structures, whereas the cold dark matter paradigm is in general agreement with the observations.

— Freebase

Right

Right

rīt, n. that which is right or correct: truth: justice: virtue: freedom from error: what one has a just claim to: privilege: property: the right side.—n. Right′-about′, in the opposite direction.—adj. Right′-ang′led, having a right angle or angles; Right′-drawn (Shak.), drawn in a right or just cause.—v.t. Right′en, to set right.—n. Right′er, one who sets right or redresses wrong.—adj. Right′ful, having a just claim: according to justice: belonging by right.—adv. Right′fully.—ns. Right′fulness, righteousness: justice; Right′-hand, the hand which is more used, convenient, and dexterous than the other.—adj. chiefly relied on.—adj. Right′-hand′ed, using the right-hand more easily than the left: dextral: clockwise.—ns. Right′-hand′edness; Right′-hand′er, a blow with the right-hand.—adjs. Right′-heart′ed, having right or kindly dispositions: good-hearted; Right′less, without right.—adv. Right′ly, uprightly: suitably: not erroneously.—adj. Right′-mind′ed, having a right or honest mind.—ns. Right′-mind′edness, the state of being right-minded; Right′ness, the character of being right, correctness: the state of being on the right-hand; Right-of-way, the right which the public has to the free passage over roads or tracks, esp. such as are not statutory roads.—advs. Rights (obs.); Right′ward.—n. Right′-whale, the Greenland whale, the most important species of the true whales.—Right and left, on both sides; Right ascension (see Ascension); Right bank of a river, the bank on the right hand of a person looking in the direction the water flows; Right down, plainly; Right of action, a right which will sustain a civil action; Right off, immediately; Right the helm, to put it amidships, in a line with the keel.—Absolute rights, those which belong to human beings as such; At all rights, in all points; Base right (Scots law), the right which a disposer acquires when he disposes of feudal property; By right, or rights, rightfully; Claim of Right, the statement of the right of the church to spiritual independence and liberty from the interference of the civil courts in her spiritual functions, adopted by an immense majority of the General Assembly in 1842; Contingent rights, such as are distinguished from vested rights; Declaration and Bill of Rights, the instrument drawn up by the Convention Parliament which called the Prince and Princess of Orange to the throne of England in 1689, stating the fundamental principles of the constitution; Declaration of the Rights of Man, a famous statement of the constitution and principles of civil society and government adopted by the French National Assembly in August 1789; Do one right, to do one justice; Have a right, to be under a moral necessity; Have right, to be right; In one's own right, by absolute and personal right; In

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. new
  • B. experient
  • C. unpracticed
  • D. callow